School of Medicine


Showing 11-19 of 19 Results

  • Jin Billy Li

    Jin Billy Li

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests RNA editing: identification, regulation, and function

  • David Liang, MD, PhD

    David Liang, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Bio Stanford researchers are creating a micro-device that physicians could guide through the body to help diagnose and treat clogged arteries and other diseases. Tethered to the outside world by a thin wire, a tiny machine creeps through blood vessels, searching out deadly plaques and obliterating them with a zap of a laser. While a laser will come later, for now David Liang, MD, PhD, is focusing on a tiny eye that could give physicians an unprecedented view into blood vessels.

  • Ronglih Liao

    Ronglih Liao

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Bio Dr. Liao is a Professor of Medicine and co-Director of Stanford Cardiac Amyloid Center. The major goal of her research program focuses on understanding the mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiology of heart failure and developing novel treatments to combat this process. Her laboratory has played an international leading role in the study of amyloid light chain (AL) cardiomyopathy, a rare and fatal form of cardiovascular disease. We have described the underlying pathophysiologic basis for amyloid cardiomyopathy and found that the circulating amyloidogenic light chain proteins that characterize this disease directly result in a specific cardiotoxic response. Consequently, our research work has redefined AL cardiomyopathy and has raised new treatment approaches. More recently, her research efforts have expanded to include transthyretin (ATTR) cardiac amyloidosis.

    In line with her goal of revealing novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiovascular disease, our efforts have also focused on characterizing and harnessing endogenous cardiac regenerative mechanisms. Her laboratory initially demonstrated the therapeutic potential of exogenous primitive muscle cells delivered to the injured heart. This work was among the earliest milestones in the field and served as the basis for an international trial of cell-based therapy. Subsequently, Liao lab identified and characterized a population of cardiac progenitor cells and its relationship and dynamic activity following cardiac injury in the adult heart. Her laboratory aims to reveal the molecular mechanisms regulating the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart and to harness such repair mechanisms for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Dr. Liao has lectured extensively on both amyloid cardiomyopathy and stem cell biology, and have maintained a history of independent NIH funding in these areas for more than two decades.

    Over the course of her academic career, she has taken the greatest pride in mentoring the next generation of scientists. Dr. Liao has had the privilege to supervise several dozen students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty, many of whom have gone on to independent academic careers at the highest institutions. Her contribution to the advancement of scientific knowledge also includes lecturing at various university and academic institutions as well as at scores of conferences and symposia locally, nationally, and internationally.

  • Michaela Liedtke

    Michaela Liedtke

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) Design of phase I/II trials for the treatment of Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    2) Conduct of clinical trials to improve the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    3) Outcomes research using clinical databases for patients with Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    4) Characterization of the molecular mechanism of MLL-induced acute leukemia

  • Kyle Loh

    Kyle Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology (Stem Cell)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have developed a strategy to generate fairly pure populations of various human tissue progenitors in a dish from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We have delineated the sequential lineage steps through which ESCs diversify into various tissues, and in so doing, developed methods to exclusively induce certain fates at the expense of others. The resultant pure populations of tissue progenitors are the fundamental building blocks for regenerative medicine.

  • Jonathan Z. Long

    Jonathan Z. Long

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory studies mammalian energy and metabolic homeostasis. Our research combines classical in vitro bucket biochemistry, emerging chemical technologies, and genetic manipulations in cultured cells and in mice to uncover new pathways that control energy storage and energy use. Ultimately, we seek to translate our discoveries into therapeutic opportunities for metabolic and other chronic diseases.

  • Michael Longaker

    Michael Longaker

    Deane P. and Louise Mitchell Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have six main areas of current interest: 1) Cranial Suture Developmental Biology, 2) Distraction Osteogenesis, 3) Fibroblast heterogeneity and fibrosis repair, 4) Scarless Fetal Wound Healing, 5) Skeletal Stem Cells, 6) Novel Gene and Stem Cell Therapeutic Approaches.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: