School of Medicine


Showing 1-7 of 7 Results

  • Saad A. Khan, MD

    Saad A. Khan, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Saad A. Khan, MD is a medical oncologist focused on the treatment of head and neck, thyroid and lung cancers. His research interests include therapeutic clinical trials as well as mechanisms of reducing toxicities that patients experience. His research activities include ongoing clinical trials of targeted and immune therapy in aggressive thyroid malignancies. He is a member of the NRG Head and Neck Committee, the ECOG Head and Neck Core and Thoracic Committees and the National Cancer Institute?s Head and Neck Steering Committee Rare Tumor Task Force.

    When not in clinic or the hospital he enjoys spending time with his family and 3 children, hiking and sitting on the beach.

  • Youn H Kim, MD

    Youn H Kim, MD

    The Joanne and Peter Haas, Jr., Professor for Cutaneous Lymphoma Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research in cutaneous lymphomas, especially, mycosis fungoides; studies of prognostic factors, long-term survival results, and effects of therapies. Collaborative research with Departments of Pathology and Oncology in basic mechanisms of cutaneous lymphomas. Clinical trials of new investigative therapies for various dermatologic conditions or clinical trials of known therapies for new indications.

  • Shivaani Kummar

    Shivaani Kummar

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kummar?s research interests focus on developing novel therapies for cancer. She specializes in conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic driven first-in-human trials tailored to make early, informed decisions regarding the suitability of novel molecular agents for further clinical investigation. Her studies integrate genomics and laboratory correlates into early phase trials. She is interested in alternate trial designs to facilitate rational drug selection based on human data and help expedite drug development timelines. She has published numerous articles in medical journals and serves on a number of national and international scientific committees.

  • Pamela L. Kunz

    Pamela L. Kunz

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Kunz specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies with an expertise in the care of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). She has developed broad investigative programs in the field of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), encompassing clinical trials, population sciences, and translational correlates. Stanford has a robust referral base for neuroendocrine tumors and has demonstrated successful accrual to clinical trials in this rare disease. She has been involved with the design, development and conduct of Phase I, II, and III clinical trials in this field. She holds a number of leadership positions in the field including Vice Chair of the Neuroendocrine Tumor Taskforce of the National Cancer institute and member of the NANETS Board of Directors. She also serves on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Neuroendocrine Tumors Guidelines Panel and the NET Working Group of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and is the founding Director of the Stanford Neuroendocrine Tumor Program, established in 2015.

  • Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Health Research and Policy at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I aim to improve the outcomes of women's cancers through clinically-oriented research on genetic risk assessment, risk-adapted screening and prevention.

  • David Kurtz

    David Kurtz

    Instructor, Medicine - Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Implementation of noninvasive detection of malignancies in the clinic remains difficult due to both technical and clinical challenges. These include necessary improvements in sensitivity and specificity of biomarkers, as well as demonstration of clinical utility of these assays. My research focuses on technical development and implementation of assays to detect and track cancers in order to facilitate personalized disease management.

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