School of Medicine


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  • Laura Michele Hack

    Laura Michele Hack

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Laura Hack is a Postdoctoral Fellow and Clinical Instructor under the mentorship of Drs. Leanne Williams, Alan Schatzberg, and Ruth O?Hara. She is a translational clinician with a research passion for integrating multiple types of biological and environmental data using advanced analytic techniques into a neuroscience-based taxonomy of mood, anxiety, and stressor-related disorders. Laura envisions herself as a ?psychiatrist of the future,? incorporating genetic information, brain imaging, blood-based markers, and data from wearable sensors into diagnostic and treatment decisions to help relieve the suffering that arises from our current trial-and-error approach.

  • Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary area of scholarly and clinical interest is the pathogenesis of problem behaviors shown by individuals diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), particularly those with neurogenetic forms of IDD, such as fragile X syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome. My work aims to both advance understanding of these disorders and to identify effective new treatment approaches for pediatric and adult patient populations by state-of-the-art methodologies, such as brain imaging, eye tracking and functional analysis to determine how environmental and biological factors affect the development of aberrant behaviors in these syndromes. The end goal of my research is to create patient-specific methods for treating the symptoms of these disorders.

  • Joachim Hallmayer

    Joachim Hallmayer

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Principal Investigator
    Infrastructure to facilitate discovery of autism genes
    The purpose of this project is to facilitate the discovery of the genes that contribute autism by maintaining an infrastructure which research groups studying the genetics of autism can work collaboratively. This will be
    accomplished through workshops, a Virtual Private Network, and access to a database that includes phenotype and genotype data from all participating groups.

    Principal Investigator
    A California Population-Based Twin Study of Autism
    This will address several fundamental questions: (1) What is the heritability of autism (2) What is the contribution of genetic factors to variation in symptom dimensions? (3) Is there a continuum between the quantitative neurocognitive traits and clinical disorder? (4) What proportion of the variance in the neurocognitive traits is accounted for by genetic and non-genetic factors?

    Co-Investigator
    Center for Integrating Ethics in Genetics Research(Cho)
    The goal of this project is to serve as a center of excellence in neurogenetics research, to develop a national model for bench, to bedside research ethics consultation, and to provide training opportunity in biomedical ethics.

    Co-Investigator
    Gene, Brain and Behavior in Turner Syndrome(Reiss)
    The primary objective of this project is to use advanced, multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, analyses of X chromosome parent-of-origin and cognitive-behavioral assessment to elucidate the effects of monosomy and X-linked imprinting on neurodevelopment and neural function in a large cohort of young girls with Turner syndrome, pre-estrogen replacement.

    Project Director
    Project F: Genomic Analysis in narcolepsy cataplexy
    The goal of the project is to locate genes outside the HLA region that influence susceptibility to narcolepsy. In order to localize these genes we will carry out a linkage and association study in the most extensive world-wide collection of DNAs from well-characterized patients with narcolepsy and their families.

  • Casey H. Halpern, MD

    Casey H. Halpern, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are currently investigating the effects of deep brain stimulation in obesity using mouse models of human behavior. Many obese individuals exhibit behavioral disinhibition, a clinical feature of many neurologic and psychiatric conditions. We are dissecting the mesocorticolimbic circuit with novel techniques including optogenetics.

  • Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The neurobiology of autism
    Neuroimaging in individuals with autism
    Psychopharmacological treatment of children and adults with autism and/or developmental disorders
    The neurobiology and innovative interventions of several neurogenic disorders including DiGeorge Syndrome (Velocardiofacial syndrome; 22q11.2 mutations), PTEN mutations, and Phelan McDermid Syndrome (22q13 mutations).

  • Kate Hardy

    Kate Hardy

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Kate Hardy is a California Licensed Psychologist who has specialized in working with individuals with psychosis for over 15 years in both research and clinical settings. Dr. Hardy received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Liverpool, United Kingdom. She has worked in specialist early psychosis services in both the UK and the US, including UCSF?s Prodrome Assessment Research and Treatment (PART) program, where she completed her post-doctoral fellowship, and as Clinical Director for the Prevention and Recovery from Early Psychosis (PREP) program. Dr. Hardy has significant experience in providing CBTp to individuals with early psychosis, and those at risk of developing psychosis, in both individual and group settings and integration of this clinical intervention to broader systems and staff teams. She has led multiple trainings and workshops in CBTp to a wide variety of audiences including community clinicians, psychiatrists, and families, and provides ongoing supervision and consultation in this approach. Dr. Hardy is also involved in the implementation of national strategies to increase dissemination of early psychosis models with the aim of bringing these cutting edge treatments to a broader population.

  • Nancy A. Haug

    Nancy A. Haug

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Haug supervises a supplemental practicum for doctoral students who are co-leading a Mindfulness group in the Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic. She leads a journal club for Addiction Medicine fellows. She also collaborates with Dr. Anna Lembke and Dr. Matthew Kendra on several projects and dissertations related to addiction treatment.

    Dr. Haug is an Affiliate in the Williams PanLab, which investigates precision mental health and translational neuroscience. Dr. Haug supervises postdoctoral fellows and practicum students, and collaborates with Dr. Leanne Williams to develop a training protocol for clinical feedback sessions based on neurocognitive and behavioral assessments. She is particularly interested in the relationship between cannabis and anxiety on neurocognitive functioning.

    Dr. Haug is a core faculty member in the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium where she teaches and advises doctoral students in clinical psychology. Her primary affiliation is with Palo Alto University and she has a small private practice in San Jose, CA.

  • Chris Hayward

    Chris Hayward

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Hayward's research has focused on risk factors for the onset of adolescent internalizing disorders in adolescent girls and the role of early puberty specifically.

  • Kimberly Hill

    Kimberly Hill

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Hill received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Ohio University. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System and postdoctoral fellowship in the Psychiatry Department at the Stanford University School of Medicine where she currently serves as a Clinical Associate Professor. Dr. Hill has published articles and made presentations related to psychology training, pain management, serious mental illness including Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and sexual dysfunction.

    Dr. Hill's time is divided across clinical, research, administrative, and teaching domains. Her current adult-focused clinical interests are varied including insomnia/depression, social anxiety, relationship difficulties, and post-traumatic stress disorder. The remainder of her time is committed to psychology training as the Co-Director of Clinical Training for the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium. On a national level, she currently serves as a Board Member of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers.

  • Korey Hood

    Korey Hood

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Bio Dr. Hood directs NIH- and foundation-funded clinical research aimed at promoting health and quality of life outcomes for people with diabetes. He has expertise and experience with diabetes epidemiology and interventions, study design, methodology, data management, and advanced statistical methods. There are two content threads to his work: 1) construct prevention and treatment programs to address modifiable psychological and family factors that create barriers to optimal diabetes management, and 2) optimize the use of devices and technologies to improve health outcomes. With regard to the first thread, Dr. Hood has successfully implemented depression screening programs in tertiary diabetes and GI clinics within a Quality Improvement framework, and recently completed a large scale clinical trial on a distress prevention program for teens with type 1 diabetes. Dr. Hood manages and analyzes all the data from these studies. From a device and technology standpoint, Dr. Hood coordinates the Human Factors assessments in Drs. Maahs? and Buckingham?s closed loop studies and is recognized as one of the experts in this area nationally and internationally. In addition, he has implemented Human Factors assessments in national (e.g., T1D Exchange) studies and registries and is the lead psychologist on 2 of the 4 UC4 grants from NIDDK (Hovorka, PI; Bergenstal, PI). These assessments focus on uptake of devices and technologies, and determining strategies to promote uptake and optimize their use. Dr. Hood and his research team have published over 100 scientific articles on these topics and are active presenters at diabetes, behavioral medicine, and advocacy conferences.

    Dr. Hood also works in clinical and service settings. Dr. Hood is a licensed clinical psychologist and is part of the diabetes care team at Stanford. He is the past chair of the American Diabetes Association?s Behavioral Medicine and Psychology Interest Group and is currently a member of the Research Policy Committee. He was also a member of the ADA?s Call to Congress in March 2017. Dr. Hood is an Associate Editor for both Diabetes Care and Pediatric Diabetes.

  • Valerie Hoover

    Valerie Hoover

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Hoover's research interests include translating behavioral weight management interventions to the Cardiology setting, and developing novel interventions to improve biopsychosocial outcomes in Cardiology.

  • SM Hadi Hosseini

    SM Hadi Hosseini

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab?s research portfolio crosses multiple disciplines including computational neuropsychiatry, cognitive neuroscience, multimodal neuroimaging and neurocognitive rehabilitation. Our computational neuropsychiatry research mainly involves investigating alterations in the organization of connectome in various neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive disorders using state of the art neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, sMRI, DWI, functional NIRS) combined with novel computational methods (graph theoretical and multivariate pattern analyses).

    The ultimate goal of our research is to translate the findings from computational neuropsychiatry research toward developing personalized interventions. We have been developing personalized interventions that integrate computerized cognitive rehabilitation, real-time functional brain imaging and neurofeedback, as well as virtual reality (VR) tailored toward targeted rehabilitation of the affected brain networks in patients with neurocognitive disorders.

  • Rona Hu

    Rona Hu

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Hu is Medical Director of the Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Unit at Stanford Hospital, specializing in the care of those with serious mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar and depression. She completed medical school and residency in psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, and fellowships in Pharmacology and Schizophrenia Research through the National Institutes of Health. She is also active in the minority issues and cultural psychiatry, and has received regional and national recognition for her clinical care, research and teaching.

  • Lynne C. Huffman

    Lynne C. Huffman

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests and activities include (1) shared decision-making in clinical care; (2) medical education research; (3) the early identification and treatment of behavioral problems, particularly in children with special health care needs; and (4) community-based mental health/educational program evaluation and outcomes measurement.

  • Keith Humphreys

    Keith Humphreys

    Esther Ting Memorial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Humphreys researches interventions for substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. He focuses particularly on evaluating the outcomes of professionally-administered treatments and peer-operated self-help groups (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous), developing health services research-related applications for innovative qualitative and quantitative research techniques, and analyzing national mental health policy.

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