School of Medicine


Showing 1-12 of 12 Results

  • Aaron D. Gitler

    Aaron D. Gitler

    The Stanford Medicine Basic Science Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the mechanisms of human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and ALS. We don't limit ourselves to one model system or experimental approach. We start with yeast, perform genetic and chemical screens, and then move to other model systems (e.g. mammalian tissue culture, mouse, fly) and even work with human patient samples (tissue sections, patient-derived cells, including iPS cells) and next generation sequencing approaches.

  • Anna Louise Gloyn

    Anna Louise Gloyn

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Bio Dr Anna Gloyn has recently relocated to Stanford University from the University of Oxford, UK where she was based for fifteen years at the Oxford Centre for Diabetes Endocrinology and Metabolism and the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics.

    Anna completed her DPhil at the University of Oxford under the supervision of the late Professor Robert Turner. Her post-doctoral training was carried out at the University of Exeter under the mentorship of Professors Andrew Hattersley & Sian Ellard and at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia under the mentorship of Professor Franz Matschinsky. In 2004 she returned to Oxford with a Diabetes UK RD Lawrence Career Develop Fellowship and established her own research group focused on understanding beta-cell function through the investigation of genetic variants causally implicated in monogenic diabetes. Since her return to Oxford Dr Gloyn received continuous personal funding from Diabetes UK, the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust. In 2011 she was awarded a prestigious Wellcome Senior Fellowship in Basic Biomedical Science which she successfully renewed in 2016.

    Anna?s research is focused on using naturally occurring mutations in humans as tools to identity critical regulatory pathways and insights into normal physiology. Anna?s early post-doctoral research led to the identification a new genetic aetiology for permanent and transient neonatal diabetes due to KCNJ11 mutations and resulted in one of the first examples of the determination of the molecular genetic aetiology leading to improved treatment options for patients. Whilst in Oxford, Anna's team discovered a novel genetic cause of constitutive insulin sensitivity in humans due to mutations in the PTEN gene highlighting the complex interplay between pathways involved in cell-growth and metabolism. Anna's current research projects are focused on the translation of genetic association signals for type 2 diabetes and glycaemic traits mechanisms for beta-cell dysfunction and diabetes. Her group uses a variety of complementary approaches, including human genetics, genomics, physiology and islet-biology to dissect out the molecular mechanisms driving disease pathogenesis.

    Anna is an active member of multiple internal genetic discovery efforts including: NIH/Pharma funded Accelerated Medicines Partnership, DIAGRAM (Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis), MAGIC (Meta-analysis of Glucose and Insulin traits Consortium), Type 2 Diabetes Genetic Exploration by Next-generation sequencing in multi-Ethnic Samples (T2D-GENES) and the Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes (GoT2D). She was also involved in the IMI funded STEMBANCC project which focused on delivering human IPS cell derived beta-cell models for drug discovery efforts.

    Anna is also involved in several initiatives under the Human Islet Research Network (HIRN): the NIDDK funded Human Pancreas Atlas Programme (HPAP) for Type 2 Diabetes, and the International Islet Phenotyping Programme (IIPP).

  • John Gorzynski

    John Gorzynski

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Genetics

    Bio Veterinarian and Researcher with a keen interest in genetic determinants of cardiomyopathies in great apes

  • Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and, Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Since 1992 my work has concentrated on ethical, legal, and social issues in the biosciences. I am particularly active on issues arising from neuroscience, human genetics, and stem cell research, with cross-cutting interests in human research protections, human biological enhancement, and the future of human reproduction.

  • William Greenleaf

    William Greenleaf

    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab focuses on developing methods to probe both the structure and function of molecules encoded by the genome, as well as the physical compaction and folding of the genome itself. Our efforts are split between building new tools to leverage the power of high-throughput sequencing technologies and cutting-edge optical microscopies, and bringing these technologies to bear against basic biological questions by linking DNA sequence, structure, and function.

  • Tuhin Guha

    Tuhin Guha

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Genetics

    Bio A research individual with more than ten years of extensive research experience in molecular biology techniques ranging from DNA/RNA manipulations, recombinant protein expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of DNA-cutting enzymes, needed for genetic engineering. I am a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Genetics, Stanford University. I work with Dr. Mike Snyder. My research involves multiplexed-molecular imaging for the precancerous and cancerous colon polyps (Familial adenomatous polyposis) using a cutting-edge technology, Codex. My previous work involved novel gene therapy approaches to cure muscle disorders, particularly Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A using mouse models, and gene repair studies using modified CRISPR system through plasmid/protein-oligo based transfections, electroporation in human cells, microinjection in frog embryos and analyzing editing efficiencies using flow cytometry. I have a multi-disciplinary background, therefore I have a solid understanding and working knowledge in a broader domain within the biological sciences, be it from animal behavior, ecology, gene regulation, genetic diseases to understanding and designing ?molecular switches? within DNA-cutting proteins, such as meganucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 for genome engineering. I have strong communication skills, presented my research in various conferences and published heavily in the field of DNA-cutting enzymes and their use as genome editing tools. I have a proven ability to manage challenging research objectives, collaborated with other research teams, and delivered results effectively. I always welcome new ideas and interact with people to learn any new skills and experiences. I have also supervised several undergraduate project students, summer students and junior graduate students. My mentorship to the lab colleagues have been very productive. While I am not working, I enjoy photography.

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