School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 12 Results

  • Greg Charville, MD, PhD

    Greg Charville, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio As Assistant Professor of Pathology at Stanford University School of Medicine, Dr. Charville has a special interest in the diagnosis of rare tumors that derive from bone and soft tissues, including muscle, fat, blood vessels, cartilage, and other connective tissues. He also specializes in the classification and study of disorders related to the gastrointestinal and hepatopancreatobiliary systems.

    Dr. Charville particularly enjoys working alongside Stanford's excellent physicians-in-training to classify the most diagnostically challenging cases in collaboration with pathologists from around the world, bringing to bear cutting-edge techniques for comprehensive histologic and molecular characterization in each case. This experience serves as the inspiration for laboratory-based investigation of the molecular basis of human disease, focusing on genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of neoplasia.

  • Athena Cherry

    Athena Cherry

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The use of molecular and molecular cytogenetic methods to identify chromosomal abnormalities in acquired and congenital disorders.

  • Michael Cleary

    Michael Cleary

    Lindhard Family Professor in Pediatric Cancer Biology and Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The role of oncoproteins in cancer and development; molecular and cellular biology of hematologic malignancies; targeted molecular therapies of cancer.

  • Maria Inmaculada Cobos Sillero

    Maria Inmaculada Cobos Sillero

    Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab uses cellular and molecular methods, single-cell technology, and quantitative histology to study human neurodegenerative diseases. Current projects include:

    - Using single-cell RNA-sequencing to understand selective vulnerability and disease progression in human Alzheimer?s disease brain

    - Investigating mechanisms of tau-related neurodegeneration in human brain

    - Studying the neocortical and limbic systems in Diffuse Lewy Body Disease (DLBD) at the single cell level

  • Le Cong

    Le Cong

    Assistant Professor of Pathology (Pathology Research) and of Genetics

    Bio Dr. Cong is leading a group in the Department of Pathology and Genetics at Stanford School of Medicine to pursue novel technology for scalable genome editing and single-cell genomics, and accompanying computational approaches inspired by data science. His group has a focus on studying immunology in the context of cancer and neuroscience.

    He obtained his BS with highest honor from Tsinghua University studying Electronic Engineering and then Biology, his Ph.D. from Harvard Medical School co-advised by Drs. Feng Zhang and George Church. He completed doctoral work primarily in Dr. Feng Zhang?s laboratory, where he published seminal studies on harnessing CRISPR/Cas9 for gene editing, including the most highly-cited paper in CRISPR field, with cumulative citation over 15,000 times. He has obtained over 20 issued patents as co-inventor, and his work led to one of the first FDA-approved clinical trials employing viral delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 for in vivo gene therapy. His later work applied single-cell RNA-seq to cancer drug discovery under Dr. Aviv Regev at the Broad Institute with Drs. Tyler Jacks and Vijay Kuchroo.

    Dr. Cong was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) International Fellow, a Cancer Research Institute (CRI) Irvington Fellow, and was selected as Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list of young innovators, MIT TechReview TR35 China, and 2019 ?Top 10 under 40? by GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News).

  • M. Ryan Corces

    M. Ryan Corces

    Instructor, Pathology

    Bio Dr. Corces is an instructor at Stanford University in the department of Pathology. He graduated from Princeton University in 2008 with a degree in molecular biology. He began his PhD in cancer biology at Stanford University in 2009, focusing on the genomic evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) under the mentorship of Dr. Ravindra Majeti. His doctoral work led to the identification of pre-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells, which serve as the reservoir for mutation acquisition in AML. He and others have demonstrated that these pre-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells are the evolutionary ancestors to AML, they persists during remission, and may represent a novel avenue for the development of relapsed disease. Dr. Corces has continued his research at Stanford as a postdoctoral fellow under the mentorship of Dr. Howard Chang and Dr. Thomas Montine. His current research focuses on the role of the epigenome in human health and disease with a focus on cancer and neurodegenerative disease.

  • Joanne Cornbleet

    Joanne Cornbleet

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As medical director of the Hematology Laboratory, my main focus is service work, including laboratory administration, bone marrow pathology, and flow cytometry interpretation. Publications arise primarily from development or evaluation of laboratory methods or collections of unusual patient cases.

  • Helio Costa

    Helio Costa

    Instructor, Pathology

    Bio Helio Costa, PhD, is a geneticist with expertise in genomics, molecular biology, molecular oncology, and bioinformatics. He is currently an Instructor within the Departments of Pathology and Biomedical Data Science at Stanford Medical School. Dr. Costa's research utilizes next-generation sequencing to develop new clinical genome and transcriptome profiling methods with the end goal of translating these tools to clinical diagnostic tests for implementation at Stanford Health Care. His research group is also interested in developing data science and machine learning methods to model and predict clinical outcomes and aid in clinical decision support. He is the founding director of the Stanford Clinical Data Science Fellowship where post-doctoral fellows engage in interdisciplinary clinical research and embed in health care workflows learning, building and deploying real-world health data solutions in the Stanford Health Care system. Additionally, he is an Attending Geneticist, and Assistant Lab Director of the Molecular Genetic Pathology Laboratory for Stanford Health Care. Dr. Costa received his BS in Genetics from University of California, Davis, his PhD in Genetics from Stanford University School of Medicine, and his ABMGG Clinical Molecular Genetics and Genomics fellowship training from Stanford University School of Medicine.

  • Tina Cowan

    Tina Cowan

    Professor of Pathology (Clinical) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests screening and diagnosis of patients with inborn errors of metabolism, including newborn screening, development of new testing methods and genotype/phenotype correlations.

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