School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 44 Results

  • Sepideh Bajestan

    Sepideh Bajestan

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuropsychiatry
    Functional Neurological Symptom Disorders, Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures
    Group and Individual Psychotherapy
    Impulse Control Disorders

  • Tali Ball, PhD

    Tali Ball, PhD

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Tali Ball, PhD is the Director of the Stanford Translational Anxiety Research (STAR) Lab and an Instructor in the Stanford Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Her primary research aim is to translate neurobiologically-based models of anxiety into improved treatment outcomes. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program, where her dissertation work established relationships between brain activation during fear extinction learning and anxiety reduction following a brief exposure intervention. Her postdoctoral research focused on developing clinically useful metrics of brain circuit function and incorporating neuroscience-based assessments into clinical practice. Her work brings together clinical psychology, neuroscience, and computational approaches, always with an eye towards how the results of the science can be directly implemented in clinical practice.

  • Jacob S. Ballon

    Jacob S. Ballon

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Jacob S. Ballon, M.D., M.P.H. specializes in the treatment of people with psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. He is the Co-Director of the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford which provides interdisciplinary care for people experiencing psychosis. He is also the medical director of H2 acute inpatient unit and the co-director of the specialty psychiatry clinics section in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Ballon completed his residency at Stanford in 2009 and a Schizophrenia Research Fellowship at Columbia University in 2011.

    INSPIRE is an innovative interdisciplinary client-centered resource providing respectful evidence-based care to support people to achieve meaningful recovery from psychosis through collaborative partnership with individuals and their families while advancing knowledge and training for a new generation of providers. With a recovery-oriented philosophy, the clinic provides an array of services including psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial evaluations. As a research clinic, they are focused on collaborating with multiple disciplines throughout the university to conduct clinical and basic science research including functional imaging, clinical trials, basic pathophysiology, and genetics.

    Dr. Ballon maintains an interest in understanding the connections between the brain and the rest of the body as relates to the manifestation and treatment of people who experience psychosis. He co-chairs a diverse working group that brings together researchers from throughout the university and technology community to investigate these connections and look at innovative ways to combine large-scale data to elucidate new strategies for developing pathways to prevention or treatment of psychosis. He has active projects investigating the metabolic implications of schizophrenia and of psychiatric medication including the association of antipsychotic medication with weight gain and insulin resistance.

    In understanding the whole-body impact of psychiatric illness, Dr. Ballon also has an active interest in the role that exercise can play in psychiatric treatment. He co-chairs Brain-Ex, a multidisciplinary research partnership of clinical research, neuroscience, exercise physiology, and prevention medicine to build the capacity to study the impact of physical exercise on brain response, reward pathways, neuroprotection, and prevention of psychiatric disorders. This program aims to study the neurobiology of elite athletic performance, sustained exercise behavior, and the subjective experience of exercise, as well as the potential for exercise to prevent and reverse neurodegenerative psychiatric disorders. He is the site-principal investigator of an NIMH-funded clinical trial looking at the use of aerobic exercise to improve cognition in people with schizophrenia.

  • Belinda Bandstra

    Belinda Bandstra

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Belinda S. Bandstra, MD, MA, is Clinical Associate Professor, Assistant Director of Residency Training, and Chief of the General Resident Continuity Clinic in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She supervises residents in the General Clinic, Evaluation Clinic, Individual Psychotherapy Clinic and Psychosocial Treatment Clinic, in addition to maintaining a small general clinical practice of her own. Dr. Bandstra has specific interests in issues of culture in psychiatry, transitional age mental health, and mental health and wellness in academia.

    Dr. Bandstra also teaches extensively in the Adult Psychiatry Residency Training Program. She co-directs residency coursework in: Sociocultural Issues in Psychiatry; Leadership, Scholarship, and Career Development; and Essentials of Psychiatry. Dr. Bandstra is a member of the Association for Academic Psychiatry and the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training.

  • Michele Barry, MD, FACP

    Michele Barry, MD, FACP

    Drs. Ben & A. Jess Shenson Professor, Senior Associate Dean, Global Health, Director, Center for Innovation in Global Health, Professor of Medicine & Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute and at the Freeman Spogli Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Areas of research
    Ethical Aspects of research conducted overseas
    Clinical Tropical Diseases
    Globalization's Impact upon Health Disparities
    Hemorrhagic Viruses

  • Fiona Barwick

    Fiona Barwick

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Fiona Barwick?s research interests focus on expanding sleep education, improving sleep health, and adapting treatments for sleep disorders in populations where developmental, medical, psychiatric and cultural factors intersect.

    She and Kevin Lee, MD, a psychiatrist at Stanford?s Counseling and Psychological Services, are currently completing an online survey of Student Sleep Habits and Health that was funded by a Psychiatry Innovation Grantion 2018. Survey results will inform the development of a cognitive-behavioral treatment protocol that will help students address sleep problems and manage sleep health.

    She is collaborating with Heather Poupore-King, PhD, at Stanford?s Pain Management Center, to develop an integrated treatment protocol for improving sleep and chronic pain. With the protocol now complete, Dr. Barwick and Dr. King plan to run the six-session group throughout 2019, collecting pre-treatment, post-treatment and follow-up data to analyze outcomes.

    She is working with Mitchell Miglis, MD, a Stanford neurologist who specializes in autonomic dysfunction, to adapt and refine circadian techniques and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) for treating individuals with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS).

    She is collaborating with Yishan Xu, PhD, and Chenyu Li, MD, to develop an integrated ?East-West? protocol combining principles of Cognitive Behavioral Sleep Medicine (CBSM) with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Online and in-person groups that deliver CBSM to Mandarin speakers just started, and data will be collected during 2019 in collaboration with Chongqing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital.

  • Catherine Benedict

    Catherine Benedict

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on improving cancer survivorship through better understanding of long-term health outcomes and through the development of theoretically driven, evidence-based behavioral interventions to improve adjustment, risk management, and quality of life. To this end, I lead studies aimed to guide and support patient decision-making and self-management after cancer. Much of my work focuses on the experiences of young adults affected by cancer.

  • Michele Berk

    Michele Berk

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The focus of my research is on adolescent suicidal and self-harm behavior. I am currently one of four Principal Investigators of a multisite NIMH-sponsored RCT of DBT for adolescents at high risk for suicide (NCT01528020: Collaborative Adolescent Research on Emotions and Suicide [CARES], PI: Linehan, McCauley, Berk, & Asarnow) aimed at evaluating the efficacy of DBT with adolescents compared to a combined individual and group supportive therapy control condition (IGST).

  • Rebecca Bernert

    Rebecca Bernert

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Bio Dr. Bernert is Founding Director of the Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory, and Co-Chairs a special departmental initiative to develop a Center for Premature Mortality and Suicide Prevention. She is a suicidologist, with subspecialty expertise in suicide prevention clinical trials, standardized suicide risk assessment and best practice management, and the epidemiology of self-directed violence. She has subspecialty training in behavioral sleep medicine, with a background in sleep and circadian physiology. Her program utilizes cognitive, biologic (e.g., fMRI), and behavioral testing paradigms, with an emphasis on translational therapeutics. Dr. Bernert has collaborated with NIH, DOD, DARPA, SAMHSA, and CDC on suicide prevention initiatives; and recently served as a content expert for the White House 2015 Open Data and Innovation for Suicide Prevention #Hackathon. She has also contributed to the development of clinical practice parameters, including the 2013 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Assessment and Management of Suicide Risk, with current work underway focused on investigating medical education training in suicide risk assessment and management. Her research focuses on the identification of novel therapeutic targets for suicide prevention across the lifespan, particularly those aiming to reduce stigma and enhance access to care. A specific focus of this work emphasizes the use of rapid-action, low-risk treatment approaches for the prevention of suicide. Dr. Bernert has several suicide prevention trials underway, funded by NIH and DOD, testing the preliminary efficacy of a non pharmacological insomnia treatment on suicidal behaviors. She also has several grants focused on the development of a data monitoring system for the study of local suicide clusters and emergency department based protocols to improve risk detection within pediatric suicide prevention. Our aim is to delineate transdiagnostic risk factors and biomarkers of clinical response that may inform the pathogenesis of risk and treatment innovation. An overarching mission is to harness new technologies within suicide prevention, including artificial intelligence (AI) and mobile health applications, to enhance risk detection and multidisciplinary frameworks. Advisory and advocacy work, and the way in which research guides health policy, dissemination, and national strategies for suicide prevention, represents an extension of this work. This includes recent initiatives to establish national and local guidelines for lethal means restriction and calls for advanced technology use in suicide prevention research and strategy. Last, Dr. Bernert has several pilot projects underway focused on inclusive practices in faculty diversity and development, and the way in which family-friendly policies impact faculty recruitment and retention in academic medicine.

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