School of Medicine


Showing 101-165 of 165 Results

  • Kanwaljeet S. Anand

    Kanwaljeet S. Anand

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Critical Care) and of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Anand is a translational clinical researcher who pioneered research on the endocrine-metabolic stress responses of infants undergoing surgery and developed the first-ever scientific rationale for pain perception in early life. This provided a framework for newer methods of pain assessment, numerous clinical trials of analgesia/anesthesia in newborns, infants and older children. His research focus over the past 30+ years has contributed fundamental knowledge about pediatric pain/stress, long-term effects of pain in early life, management of pain, mechanisms for opioid tolerance and withdrawal. Current projects in his laboratory are focused on developing biomarkers for repetitive pain/stress in critically ill children and the mechanisms underlying sedative/anesthetic neurotoxicity in the immature brain. He designed and directed many randomized clinical trials (RCT), including the largest-ever pediatric analgesia trial studying morphine therapy in ventilated preterm neonates. He has extensive experience in clinical and translational research from participating in collaborative networks funded by NIMH, NINDS, or NICHD, a track-record of excellent collaboration across multiple disciplines, while achieving success with large research teams like the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN). He played a leadership roles in CANDLE (Condition Affecting Neuro-Development & Learning in Early infancy) and other activities of the Urban Child Institute and UT Neuroscience Institute. More recently, he led the NeoOpioid Consortium funded by the European Commission, which collected data from 243 NICUs in 18 European countries.

  • Chad Anderson

    Chad Anderson

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Chad Anderson is a Physician Assistant at Stanford ValleyCare and a Clinical Assistant Professor with the Stanford School of Medicine MSPA program. He is the Assistant Director of PA education at ValleyCare. He is dual credentialed as a Family Nurse Practitioner and a Physician Assistant. He completed his FNP/PA training at the Stanford School of Medicine and his graduate studies at A.T. Still University ? Arizona School of Health Sciences. He has great interest in improving patient care through process improvement and has been the lead in many successful projects. He is passionate about improving our patients hospital experience as well as educating our future providers. He is also interested in Pre-Hospital Care and Emergency Medicine.

  • Kenton Anderson

    Kenton Anderson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
    Cardiac Arrest
    Emergency Ultrasound

  • Rodney U. Anderson, MD FACS

    Rodney U. Anderson, MD FACS

    Professor (Clinical) of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical Medical Research devoted to tertiary level application of treatment modalities for neurologic and functional disturbances of the genitourinary tract. Problems such as urinary incontinence, urinary retention, urinary flow dysfunction (BPH), impotence, and chronic pelvic pain syndromes are addressed. New medical devices and technology for treating these disorders are investigated

  • Thomas Anderson

    Thomas Anderson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab's research focuses on two areas:
    1. Focused ultrasound for peripheral nervous system modulation- We are interested in the potential of focused ultrasound to modulate peripheral nerves and improve both acute and chronic pain.
    2. Pediatric perioperative outcomes- Our goals are to understand A) how various perioperative pain management strategies affect outcomes in children who undergo surgery and B) whether disparities in the perioperative pain management of children occur.

  • Kazuo Ando

    Kazuo Ando

    Clinical Instructor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Bio Born and raised in Japan, Dr. Ando received an MD-PhD degree from the Aichi Medical University. After anesthesia training, Dr. Ando came to Stanford to pursue clinical and basic research experience. During his postdoctoral fellowship in Dr. Gaudilliere's laboratory (Stanford University), Dr. Ando worked on publication of ?A next-generation single-cell technology (mass cytometry) to study the feto-maternal immune system,? a project designed to evaluate the immune response associated with preterm birth. In addition, Dr. Ando performs research in Obstetrics Anesthesia, such as respiratory monitoring after cesarean sections and labor satisfaction, to obtain clinical research experience and to understand the key differences in medicine between the United States and Japan.
    After his postdoctoral fellowship, Dr. Ando has maintained his status as a researcher in Dr. Gaudilliere's laboratory, continuing work relating to pregnancy and preterm birth.
    Dr. Ando divides his efforts between laboratory research and the clinic, with 40% of his time is dedicated to the operating room.

  • Katrin Andreasson

    Katrin Andreasson

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on understanding how immune responses initiate and accelerate synaptic and neuronal injury in age-related neurodegeneration, including models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We also focus on the role of immune responses in aggravating brain injury in models of stroke. Our goal is the identification of critical immune pathways that function in neurologic disorders and that can be targeted to elicit disease modifying effects.

  • Jason Andrews

    Jason Andrews

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory aims to develop and test innovative approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and control of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. We draw upon multiple fields including mathematical modeling, microbial genetics, field epidemiology, statistical inference and biodesign to work on challenging problems in infectious diseases, with an emphasis on tuberculosis and tropical diseases.

  • Lay Teng Ang

    Lay Teng Ang

    Instructor, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

    Bio As a stem cell biologist, my overall goal is to understand the mechanisms through which stem cells differentiate into progressively-specialized cell-types and to harness this knowledge to artificially generate pure populations of desired cell-types from stem cells. My work over the past 10 years has centered on pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, which include embryonic and pluripotent stem cells), which have the remarkable ability to generate any of the hundreds of diverse cell-types in the body. However, it has been notoriously difficult to guide PSCs to differentiate into a pure population of a given cell-type. Current differentiation strategies typically generate heterogeneous cell populations unsuitable for basic research or clinical applications. To address this challenge, I mapped the cascade of branching lineage choices through which PSCs differentiate into a variety of endodermal and mesodermal cell-types. I then developed effective methods to differentiate PSCs into specific lineages by providing the extracellular signal(s) that specify a given lineage while inhibiting the signals that induce the alternate fate(s), enabling the generation of highly-pure human heart, bone (Loh & Chen et al., 2016; Cell) and liver (Loh & Ang et al., 2014; Cell Stem Cell) from PSCs. In particular, I have focused on generating pure populations of liver progenitors from PSCs; these PSC-derived human liver progenitors regenerated human liver tissue, and improved the survival of, mouse models of liver failure (Ang et al., 2018; Cell Reports). My goal is to complete the preclinical development of PSC-derived liver progenitors as a potential cellular replacement therapy for liver failure. This project will be facilitated by my experience with PSC differentiation, assays of liver cell identity and function, and mouse models of liver failure.

    I earned my Ph.D. jointly from the University of Cambridge and A*STAR and was subsequently appointed as a Research Fellow, and later, a Senior Research Fellow, at the Genome Institute of Singapore. At Singapore, I was an independent group leader and received extramural funding support as PI or co-PI on three government grants. In April 2018, I moved my laboratory to Stanford University as a Siebel Investigator and Instructor at the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine. My laboratory is supported by the Siebel Investigatorship and two grants from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

  • Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research efforts are focused on investigating the pharmacological and physiological interface of the autonomic nervous system with effector organs. Utilizing molecular, cellular, and electrophysiological techniques, we are examining alpha2 adrenergic receptor function in cultured sympathetic neurons. Future research aims will be directed toward understanding neurotransmitter release in general.

  • Martin S. Angst

    Martin S. Angst

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory's current transformative research efforts focus on studying immune health in the context of surgery and anesthesia.

  • Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The ANNES LABORATORY of Molecular Endocrinology: Leveraging Chemical Biology to Treat Endocrine Disorders

    DIABETES
    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing at a staggering rate. By the year 2050 an astounding 25% of Americans will be diabetic. The goal of my research is to uncover therapeutic strategies to stymie the ensuing diabetes epidemic. To achieve this goal we have developed a variety of innovate experimental approaches to uncover novel approaches to curing diabetes.

    (1) Beta-Cell Regeneration: Diabetes results from either an absolute or relative deficiency in insulin production. Our therapeutic strategy is to stimulate the regeneration of insulin-producing beta-cells to enhance an individual?s insulin secretion capacity. We have developed a unique high-throughput chemical screening platform which we use to identify small molecules that promote beta-cell growth. This work has led to the identification of key molecular pathways (therapeutic targets) and candidate drugs that promote the growth and regeneration of islet beta-cells. Our goal is to utilize these discoveries to treat and prevent diabetes.

    (2) The Metabolic Syndrome: A major cause of the diabetes epidemic is the rise in obesity which leads to a cluster of diabetes- and cardiovascular disease-related metabolic abnormalities that shorten life expectancy. These physiologic aberrations are collectively termed the Metabolic Syndrome (MS). My laboratory has developed an original in vivo screening platform t to identify novel hormones that influence the behaviors (excess caloric consumption, deficient exercise and disrupted sleep-wake cycles) and the metabolic abnormalities caused by obesity. We aim to manipulate these hormone levels to prevent the development and detrimental consequences of the MS.

    HEREDIATY PARAGAGLIOMA SYNDROME
    The Hereditary Paraganglioma Syndrome (hPGL) is a rare genetic cancer syndrome that is most commonly caused by a defect in mitochondrial metabolism. Our goal is to understand how altered cellular metabolism leads to the development of cancer. Although hPGL is uncommon, it serves as an excellent model for the abnormal metabolic behavior displayed by nearly all cancers. Our goal is to develop novel therapeutic strategies that target the abnormal behavior of cancer cells. In the laboratory we have developed hPGL mouse models and use high throughput chemical screening to identify the therapeutic susceptibilities that result from the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells.

    As a physician scientist trained in clinical genetics I have developed expertise in hereditary endocrine disorders and devoted my efforts to treating families affected by the hPGL syndrome. By leveraging our laboratory expertise in the hPGL syndrome, our care for individuals who have inherited the hPGL syndrome is at the forefront of medicine. Our goal is to translate our laboratory discoveries to the treatment of affected families.

  • Arash Anoshiravani

    Arash Anoshiravani

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Adolescent Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include high-risk youth, adolescent health services, and the juvenile justice system.

  • David Ansel

    David Ansel

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Bio I graduated from UCLA (now Geffen) School of Medicine, did my pediatrics residency at Columbia-Presbyterian in NYC, followed by a clinical fellowship in developmental (what was then called an ?ambulatory?) pediatrics at Boston Children?s Hospital. The first 28 years of my career were spent in clinical practice combining both DBP and primary care (the latter focused on serving CSHCN). During those years I was involved in numerous divide-bridging efforts - including programs to coordinate inpatient & outpatient medicine, connect tertiary & primary care, and promote teamwork between pediatricians, psychologists, nurse practitioners, and other community partners. I founded my own solo practice in 1989 and managed its growth to an 8-provider group over the next 25 years. Our practice was a founding member of the PPOC and I served on its board of directors for 6 years. The PPOC is one of the largest pediatric IPA?s in the country, with >200 member providers affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital. Over the years we were involved in groundbreaking QI initiatives including those involving asthma, weight, and ADHD management; medical home; and behavioral health integration with primary care.

    I?m now well into my career's ?second act? on the clinician-educator track here at Stanford. I'm proud to have piloted our division's primary care initiative (DBPCI) and am now in the process of planning for a second phase thereof, hoping to make improved collaboration between DBP and primary care more available to more patients. I also pioneered the use of telehealth in our division, and then helped guide its sudden widespread adoption by my peers during the COVID-19 crises. Looking forward, I expect what we have learned during the pandemic will inform what we do for DBPCI 2.0.

  • Eric Appel

    Eric Appel

    Assistant Professor of Material Science and Engineering, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The underlying theme of the Appel Lab at Stanford University integrates concepts and approaches from supramolecular chemistry, natural/synthetic materials, and biology. We aim to develop supramolecular biomaterials that exploit a diverse design toolbox and take advantage of the beautiful synergism between physical properties, aesthetics, and low energy consumption typical of natural systems. Our vision is to use these materials to solve fundamental biological questions and to engineer advanced healthcare solutions.

  • Sally Arai

    Sally Arai

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interest in utilizing post-transplant adoptive cellular immunotherapy to reduce GVHD and relapse in patients with high risk hematologic malignancies.

  • Amin Arbabian

    Amin Arbabian

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My group's research covers RF circuits and system design for (1) biomedical, (2) sensing, and (3) Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

  • Ronald L. Ariagno

    Ronald L. Ariagno

    Professor (Clinical) of Pediatrics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Developmental Physiology and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Research Laboratory closed in 2008.

    Current effort, as Chair of Task Force and neonatal consult at the FDA, is to establish through consensus a culture of investigation and collaboration for all clinical neonatology practices: academic, corporate and community based to maximize the opportunity to participate in research effort needed for the regulatory approval of neonatal therapeutics to improve the outcome of critically ill infants.

  • Danit Ariel

    Danit Ariel

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Bio Danit Ariel, MD MS, is double board certified in Internal Medicine and Endocrinology. Dr. Ariel graduated from UC Davis School of Medicine. She then completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Stanford and a fellowship and post-doctorate in Endocrinology and Metabolism at Stanford before joining the faculty at Stanford.

    Dr. Ariel practices general endocrinology, with a special interest in thyroid disorders, menopause, LGBTQ+ health, and transgender medicine amongst others.

    She believes in practicing compassionate care: in listening to her patients? concerns, respecting their values, communicating well, and providing an evidence-based approach to help guide individualized treatment plans. She is deeply committed to utilizing her expertise in the field of endocrinology to optimize her patients? health and well-being.

    Dr. Ariel is passionate about medical education and teaching, and serves on the teaching faculty in the Stanford University School of Medicine. She completed an honors certificate in medical education from Stanford. She is the Founding Director of the Student Guidance Program for medical students. Finally, within the division of Endocrinology, she is the Director of Faculty Wellness.

    Appointments with with Dr. Ariel are available in the Hoover Pavilion on 211 Quarry Road.

  • Bruce Arnow, Ph.D.

    Bruce Arnow, Ph.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology - Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current research interests include treatment outcome for major depression, particularly treatment refractory and chronic forms of major depression, as well as mediators and moderators of outcome; the epidemiology of chronic pain and depression; relationships between child maltreatment and adult sequelae, including psychiatric, medical and health care utilization.

  • Anna Chen Arroyo, MD, MPH

    Anna Chen Arroyo, MD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Arroyo specializes in the treatment of allergic conditions including drug allergy and asthma. She has a special interest in understanding health and healthcare disparities in allergic diseases and how allergies change over a person's lifetime.

  • Steven Artandi

    Steven Artandi

    Laurie Kraus Lacob Director of the Stanford Cancer Institute (SCI), Jerome and Daisy Low Gilbert Professor and Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect chromosome ends and shorten with cell division and aging. We are interested in how telomere shortening influences cancer, stem cell function, aging and human disease. Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that synthesizes telomere repeats and is expressed in stem cells and in cancer. We have found that telomerase also regulates stem cells and we are pursuing the function of telomerase through diverse genetic and biochemical approaches.

  • Ann M. Arvin

    Ann M. Arvin

    Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.

  • Shipra Arya

    Shipra Arya

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Shipra Arya, MD SM FACS is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the Stanford University School of Medicine and section chief of vascular surgery at VA Palo Alto Healthcare System. She has a Master?s degree in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health with focus on research methodology and cardiovascular epidemiology. She completed her General Surgery Residency at Creighton University Medical Center followed by a Vascular Surgery Fellowship at University of Michigan. She recently completed an American Heart Association (AHA) grant on risk prediction of cardiovascular outcomes and limb loss in Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) patients. She is currently funded by the NIH/NIA GEMSSTAR grant studying the impact of frailty on quality of surgical care in PAD and aortic aneurysm patients. The accumulated evidence from her research all points to the fact that frailty is a versatile tool that can be utilized to guide surgical decision making, inform patient consent and design quality improvement initiatives at the patient and hospital level. The field of frailty research in surgical population is still relatively nascent and her current work focuses on streamlining frailty evaluation, and implementation of patient and system level interventions to improve surgical outcomes and enhance patient centered care.

  • Steven Asch

    Steven Asch

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Describe your current research interest and activities

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Associate Dean, School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular), of Genetics, of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Ashley lab is focused on precision medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve the diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. At the wet bench, we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality in biological pathways and find targets for therapeutic development.

  • Rebecca Aslakson

    Rebecca Aslakson

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Rebecca A. Aslakson is an Associate Professor at Stanford University with appointments in both the Department of Primary Care & Population Health in the Palliative Care Section and the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine where she serves as Division Chief of Critical Care Anesthesia. With a Summa Cum Laude B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis, an MD from Harvard Medical School?MIT, and an MSci degree with Distinction from the University of Ulster in Northern Ireland, Dr. Aslakson completed anesthesia residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and surgical critical care fellowship at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, where she was on faculty from 2008-2017. In 2013, Dr. Aslakson obtained her PhD in Clinical Investigations from The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health with her dissertation concerning integration of palliative care in intensive care units. Triple boarded in anesthesia, surgical critical care, and palliative medicine, Dr. Aslakson is an active researcher and clinician; her goal is to improve delivery of effective and equitable palliative care, particularly to perioperative and critically ill populations. She has published over 80 peer-reviewed papers, invited editorials, and book chapters and received competitive funding from funders such as AHRQ, PCORI, the Foundation for Anesthesia Education and Research, and the National Palliative Care Research Society. Dr. Aslakson serves on national committees for professional societies including the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM), the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), and the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). Dr. Aslakson has received national awards including the 2015 AAHPM Early Career Investigator Award and the 2014 ASA Presidential Scholar Award. Dr. Aslakson clinically attends at the Stanford University Medical Center in the M4 and E2 Intensive Care Units and on the inpatient palliative care clinical service. She lives in Palo Alto, CA with her husband and two sons.

  • Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic Epidemiology, Genetic Determinants of Complex Traits related to Cardiovasular Medicine, Coronary Artery Disease related pathway analyses and integrative genomics, Mendelian randomization studies, risk prediction for major adverse cardiovascular events, cardiovascular medicine related pharmacogenomics, ethnic differences in the determinants of Insulin Mediated Glucose Uptake, pharmacoepidemiology of cardiovascular drugs & outcomes

  • Diana Atashroo

    Diana Atashroo

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Bio Dr. Diana Atashroo is coming to Stanford Hospital from NorthShore UniversityHealthSysteml in Illinois, affiliated with the the University of Chicago-Pritzker School of Medicine.

    Dr. Atashroo sees patients for general gynecology and a variety of other complex gynecologic issues. Her expertise includes evaluation and management of complex pelvic pathology and pelvic pain. Her special interests include: pudendal neuralgia and other peripheral neuropathic pain conditions, pelvic floor muscle spasms, vulvodynia, pelvic congestion syndrome, endometriosis, and interstitial cystitis. She also performs minimally-invasive gynecologic surgery, including laparoscopic and robotic procedures. She has special skills in ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks, office procedures, and Botox trigger point injections.

    She has leadership roles within AAGL (American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists) and IPPS (International Pelvic Pain Society) and has presented on various topics related to pelvic pain.

    Dr. Atashroo is committed to furthering the well-being of women, and strives to provider her patients with an individualized and comprehensive approach.

  • Laura Attardi

    Laura Attardi

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is aimed at defining the pathways of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression, using a combination of biochemical, cell biological, and mouse genetic approaches. Our strategy is to start by generating hypotheses about p53 mechanisms of action using primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), and then to test them using gene targeting technology in the mouse.

  • Paul S. Auerbach

    Paul S. Auerbach

    Redlich Family Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests wilderness medicine; frostbite; marine envenomation; emergency medical care; disaster response; concussion

  • Naola Austin

    Naola Austin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Bio Naola S. Austin M.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University and the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. She is teaching faculty at the Center for Immersive and Simulation-based Learning, OB SIM Team, and VA Palo Alto.

    She is originally from Santa Fe, NM and received her medical degree at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY. After completing residency training in Anesthesiology at the University of Washington, she went on to dual fellowship training in Obstetric Anesthesia and Healthcare Simulation.

    In addition to her work as a Co-Primary Investigator with the Safety Learning Lab, she has published basic science articles on synapse biology, clinical reviews on cervical spine injury in trauma and burns, and Simulation and Communication in Obstetric care. She has received multiple honors including U.S.-E.U. Exchange Scholar Rogers? Colloquium Speaker, Resident of the Year, and Foundation for Anesthesia Education & Research Scholar.

    Naola is an avid gardener, leisure cyclist, and very amateur rock climber.

  • Jennifer Avise

    Jennifer Avise

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Bio Dr. Avise is a board certified vascular surgeon specializing in cutting edge treatments of vascular disease. She joined the faculty of Stanford University Division of Vascular Surgery in 2016 as an Assistant Professor of Vascular Surgery. She established Stanford?s first vascular surgery practice in SHC-Emeryville and SHC-Valleycare (Pleasanton) to extend the Stanford quality and innovation in vascular surgery to the East Bay communities. Dr. Avise believes that early access to high quality care is critical for patient?s best outcomes.

    She has since recruited additional high caliber faculty to the practice. She also established and is the medical director of the East Bay IAC accredited vascular laboratory in Pleasanton where advanced noninvasive testing can be done to aid in early diagnosis of vascular disease.

    Her focus is on early detection and disease prevention, minimally invasive (endovascular) techniques, and proficiency in open surgery. She treats a wide variety of conditions including aortic aneurysm, limb salvage, varicose veins, peripheral vascular disease, carotid disease, wound care and others.

  • Rania Awaad

    Rania Awaad

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As the Director of the Muslims and Mental Health Lab, Dr. Awaad is dedicated to creating an academic home for the study of mental health as it relates to the Islamic faith and Muslim populations. The lab aims to provide the intellectual resources to clinicians, researchers, trainees, educators, community and religious leaders working with or studying Muslims.

  • David M. Axelrod, MD

    David M. Axelrod, MD

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Virtual Reality Congenital Heart Disease experience: The Stanford Virtual Heart. Currently engaged with 19 academic medical centers across the globe using our Stanford Virtual Heart to educate students and trainees, and research our VR experience as a means for training and education. Also developing next generation modeling and image interaction with Stanford engineers and educators, to promote personalized surgical training in VR and advanced educational programs in congenital heart disease.

  • Jeffrey Axelrod

    Jeffrey Axelrod

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic and cell biological analyses of signals controlling cell polarity and morphogenesis. Frizzled signaling and cytoskeletal organization.

  • Mehrdad Ayati

    Mehrdad Ayati

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Ayati completed his residency at UC Davis and his fellowship at Stanford University. During his residency at UC Davis, Dr. Ayati received the Award of Excellence in Clinical Teaching. Dr. Ayati worked at hospitals such as Lodi Memorial Hospital in Lodi, California, and as an Emergency Medicine Attending at Veteran Affairs in Palo Alto, California. Dr. Ayati worked as a Stanford Medical Director at Los Altos and Palo Alto Subacute and Rehabilitation centers and he is currently serving as a medical advisor for many Skilled Nursing facilities and also memory care units and assisted living facilities in Northen California. Dr. Ayati has a broad spectrum of practice and knowledge of general medicine and primary care in various settings, from office to Emergency room and acute and Sub-acute care. Dr. Ayati?s main areas of research and clinical focus are in the physiology of aging and on finding practical and yet innovative ways of addressing the wellbeing and needs of the population in any age category. Dr. Ayati is an advocate of his patient?s physical and mental health at any age in addition to disease management and prevention. Dr. Ayati is currently a member of the Ethnogeriatric and Quality and Policy Performance Committees of the Americal Geraitric Society. He also serves as a Community Health Advisor for Alzheimer Association, Northen California and Nevada Chapter. Dr. Ayati is the author of ?Paths to Healthy Aging?. Dr. Ayati is also a guest educational speaker on several radio stations such as National Public Radio (NPR) and San Francisco?s KQED and international and national conferences. He also testified in the Senate of the US, Special Committee of Aging in 2018 to address the challenges of aging populations in the US.
    Dr. Ayati strives to provide reliable information, effective strategies, and simple guidelines for patients of all ages to avoid or manage chronic diseases and to have a significantly better quality of life.
    Dr. Ayati?s main focus and passion are in:
    Raising awareness about Over Medication and Drug Cascade issues in the elderly population as well as highlighting prevention strategies
    Helping patients better understand and voice their end of life care choices and medical intervention wishes
    Bringing into focus the numerous social, economical, political and health challenges and hardship the elderly face in our society as well as finding solutions to address their needs
    Being the voice of the elderly in finding innovative and yet practical solutions to promote their physical and mental health and well being

  • Amit Ayer

    Amit Ayer

    Clinical Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Bio Dr. Ayer completed his undergraduate education at Queen?s University with a degree in life sciences and an honors thesis in immunology. He then completed his medical training at Wake Forest University and his neurosurgical training at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where during residency he also obtained a Master of Business Administration from Kellogg School of Management.

    As a clinical instructor at Stanford, Dr. Ayer will be focused on the surgical treatments of movement disorders, epilepsy and pain. Dr. Ayer has clinical interests in surgical treatment for epilepsy, movement disorders, skull base approaches, hydrocephalus and spine surgery. His research has focused on bioelectronic tools for the treatment of neurosurgical pathology and is interested in developing novel brain computer interfaces and biosensors for the restoration of sensorimotor function.

    In his free time, he enjoys playing guitar, hockey, hiking, and traveling.?

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