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  • Neal Dilip Amin

    Neal Dilip Amin

    Resident in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Neal D. Amin, MD, PhD received his bachelors in Biochemistry from Columbia University where he studied the structure-function relationship of neurexins and neuroligins, proteins implicated in familial autism. He continued his research interests as a medical and doctoral student at the University of California, San Diego in the Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD). Dr. Amin's doctoral research was conducted at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in the laboratory of Howard Hughes Medical Investigator Samuel Pfaff, where he studied spinal cord development and neurodegenerative disease. He used transcriptomics, mouse genetics, and deep phenotyping to uncover novel gene regulatory pathways driving the establishment of neuronal identity and function. Dr. Amin is currently a resident physician in the research track in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and has particular clinical interest in psychotherapy. He received the Outstanding Resident Award from the NIMH in 2019 and has presented his research at national and international conferences. Within the lab of Dr. Sergiu Pasca, he uses human brain organoids derived from induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurodevelopment and investigate molecular and cellular mechanisms contributing to the emergence and treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  • Ryan T. Ash

    Ryan T. Ash

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio I am a PGY3 research track resident in the Stanford Psychiatry department. I completed my MD-PhD at Baylor College of Medicine, working in the labs of Stelios Smirnakis and Huda Zoghbi, studying learning-associated synaptic plasticity in motor cortex of the MECP2 Duplication Syndrome mouse model using in vivo 2-photon imaging. I completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, studying changes in neuronal population activity in MeCP2 disorders with 2-photon genetically encoded calcium indicator imaging.
    I am currently developing methods to study the regulation of synaptic plasticity by affective state and mindful presence, using neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and source-localized EEG. I am also interested in studying alterations in the functional organization of somatomotor/interoceptive brain areas in trauma. My clinical interests include integrated psychodynamic- and mindfulness-based approaches, rTMS, and psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy.

  • Matthew Louis Edwards

    Matthew Louis Edwards

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Matthew Edwards is a resident physician in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. His clinical interests are in community psychiatry and his research interests lie at the intersection of medical history, ethics and public policy.

    Matthew graduated from Princeton University in 2010 with a degree in Sociology and received a graduate certificate in public health from the University of Texas School of Public Health in 2012. He received his MD with honors in research from the University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine in 2017. He was a Pearce Fellow in the History of Medicine at the Clendening Library of the University of Kansas Medical Center in 2015.

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