School of Medicine


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  • Bruce T. Adornato

    Bruce T. Adornato

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Adornato joined the Department of Neurology as Voluntary Clinical Faculty in 1978, (subsequently Adjunct Clinical Faculty) and has served as Director of the Neuromuscular Laboratory from 1978 until 1983, performing and interpreting nerve and muscle biopsies as well as serving as attending physician directing residents and medical students in the diagnosis and care of his private patients admitted to Stanford Hospital. Since 1986, he has been attending physician at the Palo Alto VA Hospital, directing Stanford Neurology residents and medical students in the care of veterans. He has published 69 peer reviewed papers and a number of book chapters in the field of neurology. He is currently the medical officer of a silicon valley startup exploring mobility devices for the neurologically impaired.

  • Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Gregory W. Albers, MD

    The Coyote Foundation Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group’'s research focus is the acute treatment and prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. Our primary interest is the use of advanced imaging techniques to expand the treatment window for ischemic stroke. We are also conducting clinical studies of both neuroprotective and thrombolytic strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and investigating new antithrombotic strategies for stroke prevention.

  • Katrin Andreasson

    Katrin Andreasson

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on understanding how immune responses initiate and accelerate synaptic and neuronal injury in age-related neurodegeneration, including models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We also focus on the role of immune responses in aggravating brain injury in models of stroke. Our goal is the identification of critical immune pathways that function in neurologic disorders and that can be targeted to elicit disease modifying effects.

  • Meredith Barad, MD

    Meredith Barad, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current research interests involve novel treatment paradigms for challenging pain problems such as orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia and low pressure headaches. I am also interested in migraine and trigeminal autonomic cephalgias. Finally I amI interested in the intersection between chronic pain and headache.

  • Fiona Baumer

    Fiona Baumer

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am researching the neurobiology underlying cognitive problems in pediatric epilepsy. I am using transcranial magnetic stimulation paired with EMG and EEG to study cortical excitability and plasticity in children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS or Rolandic Epilepsy). I am investigating whether changes in plasticity affect a child's ability to learn.

  • Brent R. Bluett

    Brent R. Bluett

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Brent Bluett received his bachelor?s degree in psychology at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He graduated medical school at Touro University with national osteopathic medicine honors as a member of Sigma Signa Phi. He completed neurology residency at the University of Texas Southwestern at Austin, during which he was resident chair of the Texas Neurological Society. Afterwards, he went on to obtain a fellowship in Movement Disorders at the University of California San Diego directed by Dr. Irene Litvan, a world renowned expert in atypical parkinsonism. Prior to joining the Stanford movement disorders program, Dr. Bluett worked at the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health.
    Dr. Bluett?s clinical expertise is in all movement disorders including Parkinson?s disease, essential tremor, Huntington?s disease, dystonia, normal pressure hydrocephalus, ataxia, and atypical parkinsonism (progressive supranuclear Palsy, dementia with lewy bodies, corticobasal degeneration, and multiple system atrophy). He is trained and skilled in the administration of botulinum toxin injections and deep brain stimulation programming.
    Dr. Bluett is a member of the Parkinson Study Group, Huntington Study Group, National Ataxia Foundation, Dystonia Medical Research Foundation, and he recently helped create and develop the CurePSP Centers of Care ? a national initiative dedicated to increasing access to care and advancing research initiatives for progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration.
    Dr. Bluett?s research focuses on falls prevention in movement disorders. He received NIH grant funding to explore freezing of gait in Parkinson?s disease, in order to better understand the underlying pathophysiology. He is expanding this research at Stanford University by using virtual reality to explore treatments for this disabling phenomenon.

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