School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 25 Results

  • Steven Artandi

    Steven Artandi

    Laurie Kraus Lacob Director of the Stanford Cancer Institute (SCI), Jerome and Daisy Low Gilbert Professor and Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect chromosome ends and shorten with cell division and aging. We are interested in how telomere shortening influences cancer, stem cell function, aging and human disease. Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that synthesizes telomere repeats and is expressed in stem cells and in cancer. We have found that telomerase also regulates stem cells and we are pursuing the function of telomerase through diverse genetic and biochemical approaches.

  • Robert Baldwin

    Robert Baldwin

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I closed my laboratory when I retired in 1998. I continue to do research, chiefly in collaboration with Franc Avbelj, on problems of protein folding energetics, especially peptide backbone solvation, and to write reviews.

  • Onn Brandman

    Onn Brandman

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Brandman Lab studies how cells sense and respond to stress. We employ an integrated set of techniques including single cell analysis, mathematical modeling, genomics, structural studies, and in vitro assays.

  • Patrick O. Brown

    Patrick O. Brown

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Brown, currently an emeritus professor, is CEO and founder of Impossible Foods, a company dedicated to replacing the world's most destructive technology - the use of animals to transform plant biomass into meat, fish and dairy foods - by developing a new and better way to produce the world's most delicious, nutritious and affordable meats, fish and dairy foods directly from plants. Visit impossiblefoods.com for more information.

  • Douglas L. Brutlag

    Douglas L. Brutlag

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary interest is to understand the flow of information from the genome to the phenotype of an organism. This interest includes predicting the structure and function of genes and proteins from their primary sequence, predicting function from structure simulating protein folding and ligand docking, and predicitng disease from genome variations. These goals are the same as the goals of molecular biology, however, we use primarily computational approaches.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests After shuttering the wet lab, we have focused on: a point-of-care device to measure blood ammonia and prevent brain damage; a human protein complex that juxtaposes and joins DNA ends for repair and V(D)J recombination; and strategies for teaching students and for reducing selection bias in educational programs.

  • Karlene Cimprich

    Karlene Cimprich

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genomic instability contributes to many diseases, but it also underlies many natural processes. The Cimprich lab is focused on understanding how mammalian cells maintain genomic stability in the context of DNA replication stress and DNA damage. We are interested in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to replication stress and DNA damage as well as the links between DNA damage and replication stress to human disease.

  • Rhiju Das

    Rhiju Das

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab seeks an agile and predictive understanding of how nucleic acids and proteins code for information processing in living systems. We develop new computational & chemical tools to enable the precise modeling, regulation, and design of RNA and RNA/protein machines.

  • Ronald W. Davis

    Ronald W. Davis

    Professor of Biochemistry and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Human to conduct whole genome analysis projects. The yeast genome sequence has approximately 6,000 genes. We have made a set of haploid and diploid strains (21,000) containing a complete deletion of each gene. In order to facilitate whole genome analysis each deletion is molecularly tagged with a unique 20-mer DNA sequence. This sequence acts as a molecular bar code and makes it easy to identify the presence of each deletion.

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