School of Medicine


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  • Anna Chen Arroyo, MD, MPH

    Anna Chen Arroyo, MD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Arroyo specializes in the treatment of allergic conditions including drug allergy and asthma. She has a special interest in understanding health and healthcare disparities in allergic diseases and how allergies change over a person's lifetime.

  • Harmeet Bedi

    Harmeet Bedi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Harmeet Bedi is an Interventional Pulmonologist and Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University Medical Center and School of Medicine. His expertise is in minimally invasive techniques used in the diagnosis and treatment of various airway and lung diseases such as lung cancer, benign and malignant airway obstruction, asthma, and pleural diseases. He has specific training in rigid bronchoscopy, airway stent placement, balloon bronchoplasty, endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy, bronchial thermoplasty, intrabronchial valve (IBV) insertion, pleural catheter insertion, and medical thoracoscopy. He also specializes in a variety of tumor ablative therapies including laser therapy, electrocautery, argon plasma coagulation (APC), brachytherapy, photodynamic therapy (PDT), and cryotherapy.

  • Meng Chen, MD

    Meng Chen, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Chen is a board-certified, fellowship-trained specialist in allergy/immunology and internal medicine. She is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    With training in pediatric and adult allergy/immunology, Dr. Chen provides expertise in food allergy, chronic urticaria, and angioedema. She excels at addressing the impact of allergies on quality of life and productivity among the general population.

    Driven by a desire to help people and deliver exceptional care, Dr. Chen takes great pride in the effectiveness and efficiency of her services, her attention to detail, and the excellent patient satisfaction scores she earns. She has trained and worked in a broad range of clinical care settings, including private practice, the Veterans Administration, major health systems, and academic medical centers, like Stanford Health Care.

    Dr. Chen has extensive research experience, from study start-up to manuscript preparation. She has conducted trials on immunotherapy following administration of omalizumab (Xolair®), the treatment of mast cell disorders, and the ability of milk and egg allergic patients to tolerate different preparations of these foods.

    She was principal investigator of a clinical trial studying the efficacy and safety of oral desensitization immunotherapy. She was also the PI of the MAGIC study, researching the efficacy and safety of dupilumab and milk oral immunotherapy for patients with an allergy to cow?s milk. In addition, Dr. Chen has served as an investigator on more than a dozen other trials studying new treatment regimens for peanut allergy, cow?s milk allergy, and other conditions.

    She has presented the findings of her research to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting and other conferences. Dr. Chen has authored numerous scholarly publications on topics including biologic therapy for food allergy, asthma and food allergy, prevention of peanut allergy, and treatment of mast cell disorders.

    Her work has appeared in the journals Pediatric Allergy; the Annals of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; JAMA; and, elsewhere. Dr. Chen co-wrote the chapter on allergic and immunological diseases in the book Basic Genetics and Epigenetics for the Immunologist and Allergist. She also co-wrote the chapter on complement deficiencies in the book Immunodeficiency Handbook.

    Dr. Chen has received honors and awards for her scholarship. She is a member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; and, the Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Foundation of Northern California. She has volunteered her clinical services at homeless shelters in the Bay Area.

  • Vinicio de Jesus Perez MD

    Vinicio de Jesus Perez MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My work is aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). I am interested in understanding the role that the BMP and Wnt pathways play in regulating functions of pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells both in health and disease.

  • Tushar Desai

    Tushar Desai

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the cellular and molecular events that regulate proper development of the lungs, including how the gas exchange region is maintained and renewed throughout life. We apply this knowledge to dissect how dysregulation of these normal processes can cause or contribute to specific lung diseases like pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer, and we are interested in uncovering how lung stem cells are regulated in the hopes of harnessing them as a regenerative therapy for patients.

  • Gundeep Dhillon, MD, MPH

    Gundeep Dhillon, MD, MPH

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Use of an administrative database (UNOS) to study lung transplant outcomes.
    2. Expression of the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) 1 antibody in peripheral blood after lung transplantation and its association with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (chronic rejection).
    3. Impact of airway hypoxia, due to lack of bronchial circulation, on long-term lung transplant outcomes.
    4. CMV specific T-cell immunity in lung transplant recipients and its impact on acute rejection.

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