Bio

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  • Towards artificial tissue models: past, present, and future of 3D bioprinting BIOFABRICATION Arslan-Yildiz, A., El Assal, R., Chen, P., Guven, S., Inci, F., Demirci, U. 2016; 8 (1)
  • Engineering cancer microenvironments for in vitro 3-D tumor models MATERIALS TODAY Asghar, W., El Assal, R., Shafiee, H., Pitteri, S., Paulmurugan, R., Demirci, U. 2015; 18 (10): 539-553
  • Highlights from the latest articles in advanced biomanufacturing at micro- and nano-scale. Nanomedicine Assal, R. E., Chen, P., Demirci, U. 2015; 10 (3): 347-350

    View details for DOI 10.2217/nnm.14.210

    View details for PubMedID 25707972

  • Bio-inspired cryo-ink preserves red blood cell phenotype and function during nanoliter vitrification. Advanced materials El Assal, R., Guven, S., Gurkan, U. A., Gozen, I., Shafiee, H., Dalbeyler, S., Abdalla, N., Thomas, G., Fuld, W., Illigens, B. M., Estanislau, J., Khoory, J., Kaufman, R., Zylberberg, C., Lindeman, N., Wen, Q., Ghiran, I., Demirci, U. 2014; 26 (33): 5815-5822

    Abstract

    Current red-blood-cell cryopreservation methods utilize bulk volumes, causing cryo-injury of cells, which results in irreversible disruption of cell morphology, mechanics, and function. An innovative approach to preserve human red-blood-cell morphology, mechanics, and function following vitrification in nanoliter volumes is developed using a novel cryo-ink integrated with a bioprinting approach.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/adma.201400941

    View details for PubMedID 25047246

  • Preserving human cells for regenerative, reproductive, and transfusion medicine. Biotechnology journal Asghar, W., El Assal, R., Shafiee, H., Anchan, R. M., Demirci, U. 2014; 9 (7): 895-903

    Abstract

    Cell cryopreservation maintains cellular life at sub-zero temperatures by slowing down biochemical processes. Various cell types are routinely cryopreserved in modern reproductive, regenerative, and transfusion medicine. Current cell cryopreservation methods involve freezing (slow/rapid) or vitrifying cells in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA). Although these methods are clinically utilized, cryo-injury due to ice crystals, osmotic shock, and CPA toxicity cause loss of cell viability and function. Recent approaches using minimum volume vitrification provide alternatives to the conventional cryopreservation methods. Minimum volume vitrification provides ultra-high cooling and rewarming rates that enable preserving cells without ice crystal formation. Herein, we review recent advances in cell cryopreservation technology and provide examples of techniques that are utilized in oocyte, stem cell, and red blood cell cryopreservation.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/biot.201300074

    View details for PubMedID 24995723

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