Bio

Honors & Awards


  • Dean's Fellowship, Stanford School of Medicine (2013)

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Cambridge (2010)
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Cambridge (2005)

Stanford Advisors


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Coupling of NF-protocadherin signaling to axon guidance by cue-induced translation NATURE NEUROSCIENCE Leung, L. C., Urbancic, V., Baudet, M., Dwivedy, A., Bayley, T. G., Lee, A. C., Harris, W. A., Holt, C. E. 2013; 16 (2): 166-173

    Abstract

    Cell adhesion molecules and diffusible cues both regulate axon pathfinding, yet how these two modes of signaling interact is poorly understood. The homophilic cell adhesion molecule NF-protocadherin (NFPC) is expressed in the mid-dorsal optic tract neuroepithelium and in the axons of developing retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in Xenopus laevis. Here we report that targeted disruption of NFPC function in RGC axons or the optic tract neuroepithelium results in unexpectedly localized pathfinding defects at the caudal turn in the mid-optic tract. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), which lies adjacent to this turn, stimulates rapid, protein synthesis-dependent increases in growth cone NFPC and its cofactor, TAF1, in vitro. In vivo, growth cones exhibit marked increases in NFPC translation reporter activity in this mid-optic tract region that are attenuated by blocking neuropilin-1 function. Our results suggest that translation-linked coupling between regionally localized diffusible cues and cell adhesion can help axons navigate discrete segments of the pathway.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/nn.3290

    View details for Web of Science ID 000314260200013

    View details for PubMedID 23292679

  • Imaging zebrafish neural circuitry from whole brain to synapse. Frontiers in neural circuits Leung, L. C., Wang, G. X., Mourrain, P. 2013; 7: 76-?

    Abstract

    Recent advances in imaging tools are inspiring zebrafish researchers to tackle ever more ambitious questions in the neurosciences. Behaviorally fundamental conserved neural networks can now be potentially studied using zebrafish from a brain-wide scale to molecular resolution. In this perspective, we offer a roadmap by which a zebrafish researcher can navigate the course from collecting neural activities across the brain associated with a behavior, to unraveling molecular identities and testing the functional relevance of active neurons. In doing so, important insights will be gained as to how neural networks generate behaviors and assimilate changes in synaptic connectivity.

    View details for DOI 10.3389/fncir.2013.00076

    View details for PubMedID 23630470

  • Imaging axon pathfinding in zebrafish in vivo. Cold Spring Harbor protocols Leung, L., Holt, C. E. 2012; 2012 (9): 992-997

    Abstract

    Axon pathfinding in the developing animal involves a highly dynamic process in which the axonal growth cone makes continuous decisions as it navigates toward its target. Changes occurring in the growth cone with respect to retracting from or extending into complex new territories can occur in minutes. Thus, the advent of strategies to visualize axon path-finding in vivo in a live intact animal is crucial for a better understanding of how the growth cone makes such rapid decisions in response to multiple cues. Combining these strategies with loss-of-function and/or gain-of-function techniques, one can gain some insight as to which molecules are crucial to particular growth cone behaviors at specific choice points during navigation. The major advantage of using zebrafish lies in the accessibility of major axon tracts for live microscopy, as their embryonic development occurs ex utero. Furthermore, the robust embryos remain healthy during immobilization and allow for good imaging for long periods. This protocol describes the method for stabilizing and preparing live zebrafish embryos for imaging labeled axonal tracts at high spatial and temporal resolution for up to 72 h. It has been used for retinotectal axon pathfinding, but can be adapted to visualize other axon tracts of interest.

    View details for DOI 10.1101/pdb.prot070011

    View details for PubMedID 22949713

  • Imaging axon pathfinding in Xenopus in vivo. Cold Spring Harbor protocols Leung, L., Holt, C. E. 2012; 2012 (9): 984-991

    Abstract

    Axon pathfinding in the developing animal involves a highly dynamic process in which the axonal growth cone makes continuous decisions as it navigates toward its target. Changes occurring in the growth cone with respect to retracting from or extending into complex new territories can occur in minutes. Thus, the advent of strategies to visualize axon path-finding in vivo in a live intact animal is crucial for a better understanding of how the growth cone makes such rapid decisions in response to multiple cues. Combining these strategies with loss-of-function and/or gain-of-function techniques allows one to gain some insight as to which molecules are crucial to particular growth cone behaviors at specific choice points during navigation. The main advantage of using Xenopus lies in the accessibility of major axon tracts for live microscopy, as their embryonic development occurs ex utero. Furthermore, the robust embryos remain healthy during immobilization and allow for good imaging for long periods. This protocol describes the methods for stabilizing and preparing live Xenopus embryos for imaging labeled axonal tracts at high spatial and temporal resolution for up to 72 h. This approach can been used to investigate how the knockdown of certain gene functions can affect the speed of navigation through the well-studied Xenopus retinotectal pathway. It can be adapted to visualize other axon tracts of interest.

    View details for DOI 10.1101/pdb.prot070003

    View details for PubMedID 22949712

  • Slit1b-Robo3 Signaling and N-Cadherin Regulate Apical Process Retraction in Developing Retinal Ganglion Cells JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE Wong, G. K., Baudet, M., Norden, C., Leung, L., Harris, W. A. 2012; 32 (1): 223-228

    Abstract

    When neurons exit the cell cycle after their terminal mitosis, they detach from the apical surface of the neuroepithelium. Despite the fact that this detachment is crucial for further neurogenesis and neuronal migration, the underlying mechanisms are still not understood. Here, taking advantage of the genetics and imaging possibilities of the zebrafish retina as a model system, we show by knockdown experiments that the guidance molecule Slit1b and its receptor Robo3 are required for apical retraction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In contrast, N-cadherin seems to be responsible for maintenance of apical attachment, as expression of dominant-negative N-cadherin causes RGCs to lose apical attachments prematurely and rescues retraction in slit1b morphants. These results suggest that Slit-Robo signaling downregulates N-cadherin activity to allow apical retraction in newly generated RGCs.

    View details for DOI 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2596-11.2012

    View details for Web of Science ID 000299119700021

    View details for PubMedID 22219284

  • Apical migration of nuclei during G2 is a prerequisite for all nuclear motion in zebrafish neuroepithelia DEVELOPMENT Leung, L., Klopper, A. V., Grill, S. W., Harris, W. A., Norden, C. 2011; 138 (22): 5003-5013

    Abstract

    Nuclei in the proliferative pseudostratified epithelia of vastly different organisms exhibit a characteristic dynamics - the so-called interkinetic nuclear migration (IKNM). Although these movements are thought to be intimately tied to the cell cycle, little is known about the relationship between IKNM and distinct phases of the cell cycle and the role that this association plays in ensuring balanced proliferation and subsequent differentiation. Here, we perform a quantitative analysis of modes of nuclear migration during the cell cycle using a marker that enables the first unequivocal differentiation of all four phases in proliferating neuroepithelial cells in vivo. In zebrafish neuroepithelia, nuclei spend the majority of the cell cycle in S phase, less time in G1, with G2 and M being noticeably shorter still in comparison. Correlating cell cycle phases with nuclear movements shows that IKNM comprises rapid apical nuclear migration during G2 phase and stochastic nuclear motion during G1 and S phases. The rapid apical migration coincides with the onset of G2, during which we find basal actomyosin accumulation. Inhibiting the transition from G2 to M phase induces a complete stalling of nuclei, indicating that IKNM and cell cycle continuation cannot be uncoupled and that progression from G2 to M is a prerequisite for rapid apical migration. Taken together, these results suggest that IKNM involves an actomyosin-driven contraction of cytoplasm basal to the nucleus during G2, and that the stochastic nuclear movements observed in other phases arise passively due to apical migration in neighboring cells.

    View details for DOI 10.1242/dev.071522

    View details for Web of Science ID 000296576700018

    View details for PubMedID 22028032

  • NF-Protocadherin and TAF1 regulate retinal axon initiation and elongation in vivo JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE Piper, M., Dwivedy, A., Leung, L., Bradley, R. S., Holt, C. E. 2008; 28 (1): 100-105

    Abstract

    NF-protocadherin (NFPC)-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays a critical role in vertebrate neural tube formation. NFPC is also expressed during the period of axon tract formation, but little is known about its function in axonogenesis. Here we have tested the role of NFPC and its cytosolic cofactor template-activating factor 1 (TAF1) in the emergence of the Xenopus retinotectal projection. NFPC is expressed in the developing retina and optic pathway and is abundant in growing retinal axons. Inhibition of NFPC function in developing retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) severely reduces axon initiation and elongation and suppresses dendrite genesis. Furthermore, an identical phenotype occurs when TAF1 function is blocked. These data provide evidence that NFPC regulates axon initiation and elongation and indicate a conserved role for TAF1, a transcriptional regulator, as a downstream cytosolic effector of NFPC in RGCs.

    View details for DOI 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4490-07.2008

    View details for Web of Science ID 000252242900012

    View details for PubMedID 18171927

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: