Bio

Professional Education


  • Master of Medicine, Sichuan University (2011)
  • Doctor, Sichuan University (2014)

Stanford Advisors


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal growth arrest by cutaneous scarring. Bone Li, J., Johnson, C. A., Smith, A. A., Shi, B., Brunski, J. B., Helms, J. A. 2014; 66: 223-231

    Abstract

    In pediatric surgeries, cutaneous scarring is frequently accompanied by an arrest in skeletal growth. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not understood. Here, we investigated the relationship between scar contracture and osteogenesis. An excisional cutaneous wound was made on the tail of neonatal mice. Finite element (FE) modeling of the wound site was used to predict the distribution and magnitude of contractile forces within soft and hard tissues. Morphogenesis of the bony vertebrae was monitored by micro-CT analyses, and vertebral growth plates were interrogated throughout the healing period using assays for cell proliferation, death, differentiation, as well as matrix deposition and remodeling. Wound contracture was grossly evident on post-injury day 7 and accompanying it was a significant shortening in the tail. FE modeling indicated high compressive strains localized to the dorsal portions of the vertebral growth plates and intervertebral disks. These predicted strain distributions corresponded to sites of increased cell death, a cessation in cell proliferation, and a loss in mineralization within the growth plates and IVD. Although cutaneous contracture resolved and skeletal growth rates returned to normal, vertebrae under the cutaneous wound remained significantly shorter than controls. Thus, localized contractile forces generated by scarring led to spatial alterations in cell proliferation, death, and differentiation that inhibited bone growth in a location-dependent manner. Resolution of cutaneous scarring was not accompanied by compensatory bone growth, which left the bony elements permanently truncated. Therefore, targeting early scar reduction is critical to preserving pediatric bone growth after surgery.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bone.2014.06.007

    View details for PubMedID 24933346

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