Bio

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Vice Chair of Pathology for Pediatric Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine (2015 - Present)
  • Associate Medical Director of Pathology and Clinical Laboratories for Pediatrics, Stanford Children's Health/Stanford Health Care (2014 - Present)
  • Chief of Pathology, Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital, Stanford Children?s Health (2014 - Present)
  • Director of Pediatric Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center (2014 - Present)
  • Vice-Chairman for Anatomical Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (2012 - 2014)
  • Director of Anatomical and Surgical Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (2010 - 2014)
  • Director of Orthopedic Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (2008 - 2009)
  • Director of Pediatric and Developmental Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (2008 - 2009)
  • Assistant Director of Autopsy Services, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (2007 - 2009)

Professional Education


  • Board certification, Children's Hospital Boston/Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Pathology (2003)
  • Board certification, Yale-New Haven Hospital/Yale School of Medicine, Anatomical and Clinical Pathology (2002)
  • Professional Certificate, University of New Haven, Health Care Management (2001)
  • MSc, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium, Molecular Biology (1994)
  • MD, Universidad Católica de Santiago de Guayaquil, Ecuador, Medicine and Surgery (1992)

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • Radiation Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Hydrochloride Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery Recruiting

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well pazopanib hydrochloride, combination chemotherapy, and radiation therapy work and compares it to radiation therapy alone or in combination with pazopanib hydrochloride or combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas that can be removed by surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Pazopanib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy works better when given with or without combination chemotherapy and/or pazopanib hydrochloride in treating patients with non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas.

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