School of Medicine


Showing 701-749 of 749 Results

  • ShanX. Wang

    ShanX. Wang

    Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Shan Wang was named the Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering in 2018. He directs the Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology and is a leading expert in biosensors, information storage and spintronics. His research and inventions span across a variety of areas including magnetic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cancer biomarkers, magnetic nanoparticles, magnetic sensors, magnetoresistive random access memory, and magnetic integrated inductors.

  • Sui Wang, PhD

    Sui Wang, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie retinal development and diseases. We utilize genetic and genomic tools to uncover how different types of retinal cells, including retinal neurons, glia and the vasculature, respond to developmental cues and disease insults at the epigenomic and transcriptional levels, and how they interact and collectively contribute to the integrity of the retina.

    1. Retinal cell fate specification.
    We are using genetic tools and methods, such as in vivo plasmid electroporation and CRISPR, to dissect the roles of cis-regulatory elements and transcription factors in controlling retinal cell fate specification.

    2. The multicellular responses elicited by diabetes in the retina.
    Diabetes can induce multicellular responses in the retina, including vascular lesions, glial dysfunction and neurodegeneration, all of which contribute to retinopathy. We are using diabetic rats as models to investigate the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the diabetes-induced multicellular responses, and the disease mechanisms of diabetic retinopathy.

    3. Molecular tools that allow for cell type-specific labeling and manipulation in vivo.
    Cis-regulatory elements, such as enhancers, play essential roles in directing tissue/cell type-specific and stage-specific expression. We are interested in identifying enhancers that can drive cell type-specific expression in the retina and brain, and incorporating them into plasmid or AAV based delivery systems.

  • Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD

    Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Laboratory of Mechanisms in Human Immunity and Disease Pathogenesis

    Studies in our lab are aimed at defining mechanisms in human immunity and disease. We are particularly interested the hypothesis that IgG repertoire diversity leading to diversity in antibody-based signaling, is a central driver of heterogeneity in human immune functioning and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Our work is defining how diversity that exists in the IgG Fc domain repertoire among people, which we define by serum IgG subclass and Fc glycoform distributions, impacts immune processes such as vaccine responses and recruitment of effector cells. IgG subclass and Fc glycoform distributions are key regulators of immunity because these determine the structure of Fc domains within immune complexes that form during vaccination or infection. Fc structure, in turn, determines the affinity of immune complexes for various Fc receptors on effector cells. Thus, we are studying how the Fc domain repertoire of an individual impacts the quality of effector cell responses that can be recruited during immune activation and how selectivity of effector responses contributes to immunity and disease.

    Current clinical studies:
    Recruiting:

    An Open Label Study of IgG Fc Glycan Composition in Human Immunity
    Principal Investigator: Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
    NCT01967238

  • Katja Gabriele Weinacht, MD, PhD

    Katja Gabriele Weinacht, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
    DiGeorge Syndrome
    Genetic Immune Diseases
    Immune Dysregulation

  • Dana Weintraub

    Dana Weintraub

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include: 1) Childhood obesity, community-based interventions to increase physical activity 2) Impact of medical-legal collaboration on child and family health.

  • Irving Weissman

    Irving Weissman

    Director, Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research, Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Stem cell and cancer stem cell biology; development of T and B lymphocytes; cell-surface receptors for oncornaviruses in leukemia. Hematopoietic stem cells; Lymphocyte homing, lymphoma invasiveness and metastasis.

  • Marius Wernig

    Marius Wernig

    Professor of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Epigenetic Reprogramming, Direct conversion of fibroblasts into neurons, Pluripotent Stem Cells, Neural Differentiation: implications in development and regenerative medicine

  • MatthewWheeler

    MatthewWheeler

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Translational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

  • Darrell Wilson

    Darrell Wilson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests cover a number of areas in Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes. I am PI of the Stanford Center for the NIH-funded Type-1 Diabetes TrialNet group. TrialNet conducts clinical trials directed at preventing or delaying the onset of Type 1 diabetes. I am an investigator in DirecNet, another NIH-funded study group, which is devoted to evaluating glucose sensors and the role of technology on the management of diabetes.

  • Helen Wilson

    Helen Wilson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Wilson is a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise on the effects of trauma across the lifespan. She provides clinical services for children, adolescents, adults, and families affected by trauma and other forms of anxiety and stress. Dr. Wilson also leads an active research program focused on relationships between childhood trauma and health risk behavior in adolescence and adulthood. She is the Principal Investigator of GIRLTALK: We Talk, a longitudinal study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) that examines links from childhood violence exposure to dating violence and sexual risk in young women from low-income communities in Chicago. Dr. Wilson has authored or co-authored thirty journal articles and book chapters related to these topics, and she regularly presents her work at local and national conferences. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

  • Jeffrey J. Wine

    Jeffrey J. Wine

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal is to understand how a defective ion channel leads to the human genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Studies of ion channels and ion transport involved in gland fluid transport. Methods include SSCP mutation detection and DNA sequencing, protein analysis, patch-clamp recording, ion-selective microelectrodes, electrophysiological analyses of transmembrane ion flows, isotopic metho

  • Virginia Winn

    Virginia Winn

    Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Winn Laboratory seeks to understand the unique aspects of human placental biology that contribute to pregnancy complications. Abnormalities in placental biology lead to more than 25% of pregnancy complications that impact the health of mothers and their babies. The primary focus of Dr. Winn's lab is to understand human placentation and preeclampsia pathogenesis. Both basic science and translational approaches are undertaken.

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    Bio Professor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Marlene Helen Kennedy Wolfe

    Marlene Helen Kennedy Wolfe

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Bio Marlene is a Postdoctoral Scholar with the Woods Institute for the Environment. Her research uses environmental engineering, microbiology, and epidemiology to address complex issues in WASH and child health. She has 10 years of experience working on WASH topics in low and middle income countries and emergencies, especially in East Africa. During her PhD, she focused on the development of new approaches to assess exposure to emerging infectious challenges and interventions to interrupt transmission with a focus on handwashing. At Stanford, Marlene focuses on the relationship between WASH infrastructure in communities and institutions and disease risk in the local environment. Marlene did her doctoral training in Environmental Health at Tufts University, and holds an MSc in Epidemiology from the the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a BA in Human Biology from Stanford University.

  • WingHung Wong

    WingHung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor in Science and Human Health and Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • Edward H. Wood, MD

    Edward H. Wood, MD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests http://med.stanford.edu/woodlab.html

    Edward H. Wood, MD is an assistant professor of ophthalmology practicing adult and pediatric vitreoretinal surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Wood engages in translational research with the goal of developing new therapies and approaches for patients without viable treatment options. He does so through leveraging the technologies of patient derived stem cells, optogenetics, and phenotypic drug screening in conjunction with active clinical research and surgical device development. Dr. Wood has filed numerous patents and founded several healthcare startups with the goal of improving patients? quality of life. His research interests include regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and pediatric retinal disease with the ultimate goal of pursuing basic science discoveries with potential for impactful clinical translation. His research interests are significantly inspired by his patients, and he is driven towards not only delivering the highest quality of care currently available, but also in developing the future standard of care in the field of medical retina and vitreoretinal surgery.

  • Mollie Woodworth

    Mollie Woodworth

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Many types of blindness result from the neurons of the retina no longer being able to communicate with the brain due to injury or disease. In mammals, the adult retina cannot make new retinal ganglion cells (the neurons that connect the retina with the brain) to replace those that are lost. In my work, I aim to learn about normal development of retinal ganglion cells and, further, to regenerate new retinal ganglion cells if they are lost in adulthood.

  • John Fraser Wright

    John Fraser Wright

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Bio J Fraser Wright, PhD
    Dr. Wright received his PhD in 1989 from the University of Toronto (Biochemistry) for studies
    characterizing the interaction of complement with IgM, and completed post-doctoral studies at INSERM
    / CENG Grenoble, France in molecular immunology focused on antigen processing and presentation. He
    was awarded a CRCS/ MRC Scholarship, gaining faculty appointment at the University of Toronto. In
    1996 he joined industry as a Scientist at Pasteur Sanofi, contributing there to the development of
    vaccines and cancer immunotherapies, and subsequently as Director of Development and Clinical
    Manufacturing at Avigen, a gene therapy company that pioneered AAV-based investigational gene
    therapies for hemophilia and Parkinson?s disease. In 2004 he returned to academia, establishing and
    directing the Clinical Vector Facility at the Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics at Children?s
    Hospital of Philadelphia, and gaining faculty appointment at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman
    School of Medicine as professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. Dr. Wright has contributed to
    several clinical development programs in gene therapy, including for Luxturna and Kymriah, the first
    gene therapies for a genetic (RPE65 deficiency) and non-genetic (CAR-T immunotherapy) disease,
    respectively, approved in the United States, and for the first gene therapy clinical trial that delivered an
    AAV-vectorized monoclonal antibody to human subjects for HIV passive immunity. He is a Co-founder of
    Spark Therapeutics, serving there and subsequently at Axovant as Chief Technology Officer. In 2019 Dr.
    Wright joined Stanford University as Professor of Pediatrics at The Center for Definitive and Curative
    Medicine (CDCM). His research program aims to address key immunological barriers to gene therapy
    through innovative approaches to viral vector design and generation, and to develop vectorized
    antibodies for serious human diseases.

  • Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My translational research focuses on using autologous stem cells to recreate a patient?s ocular tissues for potential transplantation. We are generating tissue from induced pluripotent stem cells to treat limbal stem cell deficiency in patients who are bilaterally blind. By applying my background in molecular and cellular biology, stem cell biology, oculoplastic surgery, I hope to make regenerative medicine a reality for those suffering from orbital and ocular disease.

  • Chien Ting Wu

    Chien Ting Wu

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Microbiology and Immunology

    Bio I started conducting research as a second-year student in college. I entered a biochemical lab to perform research and had my own project. My topic was Alzheimer's disease, and I focused on the relationship between aggregated amyloid-beta and reactive oxygen species levels in cells. I am very grateful for this particular research experience because it allowed me to realize that I am particularly interested in studying disease-associated proteins on a molecular level. Thus, these early research experiences have been invaluable in shaping my scientific interests and personality.

    I decided to pursue my graduate training straight out of college by obtaining my master?s degree. I then decided to join the Chen, I-T. Lab for my graduate research training, where I discovered that a novel recombinant protein, LZ8 cloned from Ganoderma, can inhibit the duplication of cancer cells in vitro and decrease the growth rate of tumors in vivo through regulating the p53/MDM2/mTOR signaling pathway. My findings were published in the journal Carcinogenesis. This was my first first-author paper. During this time, I learned how to become an independent scientist.

    After my master?s degree, I spent three years completing my military service as a research assistant in Academia Sinica. I worked under the supervision of Prof. Tang Tang. My research focused on the molecular mechanism of centriole duplication. In my research, I found that CEP120, a ciliopathy protein, is required to promote centriole elongation. Overexpression of CEP120 can induce overly long centrioles. This work was published in the Journal of Cell Biology. This was my second first-author paper. Because of these valuable lab experiences, I began to be fascinated by the centriole and cilium field.

    Afterwards, to better understand centriole- and cilia-related human hereditary diseases, I worked as a molecular diagnostician in a molecular diagnosis lab at Oregon Health Science University. I used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify gene mutations from ciliopathy patients. During this period, I learned how to run a complete molecular diagnosis, draw blood for running NGS, analyzing patient data, preparing patient reports and designing a novel disease panel to run NGS. This experience provided me with a new perspective and connected the things that I learned in the centriole and cilia field, from biochemistry to molecular biology to clinical diagnosis. Most importantly, this experience allowed me to realize that so many people suffer from ciliopathy disease. As a researcher, I hope to continue my research on the cilium field to help develop better clinical treatments for these patients.

    For this reason, I decided to join the Tang Tang Lab in Academia Sinica for my PhD training. The Tang Lab has a longstanding interest in understanding the mechanisms of centriole duplication and is at the forefront of research in the primary cilium field. In this period, I found that Myosin-Va, a motor protein, is required for preciliary vesicle trafficking during the early stage of ciliogenesis. This research was published in Nature Cell Biology.
    Thus, my experiences have allowed me to develop my scientific interests and to realize that I would one day like to run my own laboratory and research program focusing on cilium-related diseases.

  • Hsi-Yang Wu

    Hsi-Yang Wu

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in how the brain matures to control the bladder and external sphincter to achieve urinary continence. Using functional MRI of the brain, we are investigating if certain patterns of activity will predict which children will respond to therapy for incontinence.

  • Joseph  C. Wu

    Joseph C. Wu

    Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professor and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Drug discovery, drug screening, and disease modeling using biobank of cardiac iPSC lines.

  • Joy Wu

    Joy Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory focuses on the pathways that regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. We are also studying the role of osteoblasts in the hematopoietic and cancer niches in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  • Sean M. Wu

    Sean M. Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab seeks to identify mechanisms regulating cardiac lineage commitment during embryonic development and the biology of cardiac progenitor cells in development and disease. We believe that by understanding the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of cardiomyocyte growth and differentiation, we can identify the most effective ways to repair diseased adult hearts. We employ mouse and human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as rodents as our in vivo models for investigation.

  • Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My projects focus on clinical research in newborns with, or at risk, for brain injury. I use EEG in at-risk neonates to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of risk factors that may lead to worse outcomes. I am particularly interested in neonatal seizures and how they may exacerbate perinatal brain injury with a goal to identify treatments that might protect the vulnerable brain. I am also interested in EEG in other pediatric populations, as well as medical ethics and global health.

  • TonyWyss-Coray, PhD

    TonyWyss-Coray, PhD

    D. H. Chen Professor II

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Use of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

  • Hua Xie

    Hua Xie

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio I am a postdoc scholar at Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. I am interested in studying brain dynamics, measured using fMRI, EEG and fNIRs using manifold learning, machine learning and pattern recognition, and discovering link between brain dynamics to psychiatric diseases.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research seeks to understand how microenvironmental cues regulate stem cell fate, and to develop novel biomaterials and stem cell-based therapeutics for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our work spans from fundamental science, technology development, to translational research.We are particularly interested in developing better therapies for treating musculoskeletal diseases, cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio Fan Yang has a broad background in Computational Biology, Genomics, Oncology, Immunology, and their intersections. She did her Ph.D. at the University of Toronto and participated in several inspiring and cutting-edge projects focusing on assessing the functionality and immunogenicity of human genomic variants both experimentally and computationally. She joined the Boyd lab at Stanford for her postdoctoral work to study the B cell and T cell repertoires in human infectious diseases and vaccine responses.

  • Samuel Yang, MD, FACEP

    Samuel Yang, MD, FACEP

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Yang's research is focused on bridging the translational gap at the interface of molecular biology, genome science, engineering, and acute care medicine. The investigative interest of the Yang lab falls within the general theme of developing integrative systems-level approaches for precision diagnostics, as well as data driven knowledge discoveries, to improve the health outcome and our understanding of complex critical illnesses. Using sepsis as the disease model with complex host-pathogen dynamics, the goals of the Yang lab are divided into 2 areas:

    1) Developing high-content, near-patient, diagnostic system for rapid broad pathogen detection and characterization.

    2) Integrating multi-omics molecular and phenotypic data layers with novel computational approaches into AI-assisted diagnostics and predictive analytics for sepsis.

  • Yanmin Yang

    Yanmin Yang

    Associate Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Elucidate biological functions of cytoskeletal associated proteins in neurons. Define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in null mice.

  • Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Yang lab's research interests are in the areas of bio-inspired biomaterials, medical devices, and 3D printing approaches for re-creating a suitable microenvironment for cell growth and tissue regeneration for musculoskeletal disease diagnosis and treatment, including multiple tissue healing such as rotator cuff injury, orthopedic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, and orthopedic traumas such as massive bone and muscle injuries.

  • Mahboubeh Yazdanifar

    Mahboubeh Yazdanifar

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio Bachelor's degree in Animal Biology, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran (2007)
    Master's degree in Medical Immunology, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran (2010)
    Ph.D. degree in Biology - Cancer Immunology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, NC, USA (2019)
    Postdoctoral Scholar at Stanford University (2019 - present)

  • Jiangbin Ye

    Jiangbin Ye

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One hallmark of cancer is that malignant cells modulate metabolic pathways to promote cancer progression. My professional interest is to investigate the causes and consequences of the abnormal metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells in response to microenvironmental stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, with the prospect that therapeutic approaches might be developed to target these metabolic pathways to improve cancer treatment.

  • Jason Yeatman

    Jason Yeatman

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics) and of Education

    Bio Dr. Jason Yeatman is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Yeatman completed his PhD in Psychology at Stanford where he studied the neurobiology of literacy and developed new brain imaging methods for studying the relationship between brain plasticity and learning. After finishing his PhD, he took a faculty position at the University of Washington?s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences before returning to Stanford.

    As the director of the Brain Development and Education Lab, the overarching goal of his research is to understand the mechanisms that underlie the process of learning to read, how these mechanisms differ in children with dyslexia, and to design literacy intervention programs that are effective across the wide spectrum of learning differences. His lab employs a collection of structural and functional neuroimaging measurements to study how a child?s experience with reading instruction shapes the development of brain circuits that are specialized for this unique cognitive function.

  • Ellen Yeh

    Ellen Yeh

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The chemistry and biology of the unusual plastid organelle, the apicoplast, in malaria parasites

  • James L. Zehnder, M.D.

    James L. Zehnder, M.D.

    Professor of Pathology (Research) and of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory focuses on translational research in 2 main areas - genomic approaches to diagnosis and minimal residual disease testing for patients with cancer, and molecular basis of disorders of thrombosis and hemostasis. My clinical focus is in molecular pathology, diagnosis and treatment of disorders of hemostasis and thrombosis and general hematology.

  • Jamie Zeitzer

    Jamie Zeitzer

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Zeitzer is a circadian physiologist specializing in the understanding of the impact of light on circadian rhythms and other aspects of non-image forming light perception.
    He examines the manner in which humans respond to light and ways to manipulate this responsiveness, with direct application to jet lag, shift work, and altered sleep timing in teens. Dr. Zeitzer has also pioneered the use of actigraphy in the determination of epiphenomenal markers of psychiatric disorders.

  • J. Bradley Zuchero

    J. Bradley Zuchero

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Glia are a frontier of neuroscience, and overwhelming evidence from the last decade shows that they are essential regulators of all aspects of the nervous system. The Zuchero Lab aims to uncover how glial cells regulate neural development and how their dysfunction contributes to diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and in injuries like stroke.

    Although glia represent more than half of the cells in the human brain, fundamental questions remain to be answered. How do glia develop their highly specialized morphologies and interact with neurons to powerfully control form and function of the nervous system? How is this disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases and after injury? By bringing cutting-edge cell biology techniques to the study of glia, we aim to uncover how glia help sculpt and regulate the nervous system and test their potential as novel, untapped therapeutic targets for disease and injury.

    We are particularly interested in myelin, the insulating sheath around neuronal axons that is lost in diseases like MS. How do oligodendrocytes- the glial cell that produces myelin in the central nervous system- form and remodel myelin, and why do they fail to regenerate myelin in disease? Our current projects aim to use cell biology and neuroscience approaches to answer these fundamental questions. Ultimately we hope our work will lead to much-needed therapies to promote remyelination in patients.

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