School of Medicine


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  • Theo Palmer

    Theo Palmer

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Members of the Palmer Lab study the biology of neural stem cells in brain development and in the adult. Our primary goal is to understand how genes and environment synergize in influencing stem cell behavior during development and how mild genetic or environmental risk factors for disease may synergize in their detrimental effects on brain development or in the risk of neuronal loss in age-related degenerative disease.

  • Jon Park, MD, FRCSC

    Jon Park, MD, FRCSC

    Saunders Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Non-fusion dynamic spinal stabilization, artificial disc technologies, and regenerative spinal technologies.

  • Jonathon J. Parker, MD, PhD

    Jonathon J. Parker, MD, PhD

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Dr. Parker is currently a PGY6 Neurosurgery Resident at Stanford. He has focused his training and research on minimally invasive treatments for epilepsy and movement disorders in Adults and Children. He has focused his training to develop expertise in open microsurgical resection techniques, laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT), focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS), electrocorticography (ECoG), stereo-electro-encephalography (SEEG), and robotic-assisted surgery.

    Dr. Parker completed a year long enfolded fellowship in Adult and Pediatric Epilepsy & Functional Surgery with Dr. Gerald Grant and Dr. Casey Halpern. Guided by his surgical mentors, Dr. Parker has utilized state of the art approaches to improve epilepsy surgery by combing SEEG, 3D printing, whole brain tractography, and navigated operative exoscopes to guide safe surgical resections of epileptic foci. Dr. Parker's research revolves around optimizing SEEG techniques for intracranial evaluation of epileptic foci and clinically-relevant brain mapping via understanding the role of white matter in seizure propagation.

  • Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr Parvizi completed his medical internship at Mayo Clinic and Neurology Residency at BIDMC Harvard Medical School before joining the UCLA for fellowship training in clinical neurophysiology and epilepsy. He has worked at Stanford University Medical Center since 2007 and specializes in treating patients with uncontrollable seizures. Dr. Parvizi is the principal investigator in the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience whose research activities have been supported by National Institute of Health, National Science Foundation, and private foundations. To find out more about Dr Parvizi's scholarly activities please visit http://med.stanford.edu/parvizi-lab.html.

  • Zara Patel

    Zara Patel

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery (Rhinology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Zara M. Patel is Director of Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery and an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at Stanford. She was born and raised in St. Louis, completed her MD at the Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland, Oregon and completed her residency training in otolaryngology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, NY. After pursuing fellowship training in rhinology and endoscopic skull base surgery at Stanford University, she was recruited to join the Emory University faculty in Atlanta in 2011. After four years, the rhinology division recruited her back to the West coast to rejoin the department here at Stanford University.

    Dr. Patel is an expert in advanced endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. She treats patients with a wide variety of rhinologic complaints, including chronic sinus infection or inflammation, sinus disease that has failed medical therapy, sinus disease that has failed prior surgical therapy, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, benign and and malignant sinus and skull base tumors, as well as olfactory disorders.

    She is immediate past-Chair of the Education Committee and now Member of the Board of Directors for the American Rhinologic Society and has developed a multitude of educational materials for both physicians and patients to help them better understand rhinologic disorders. She is passionate about educating patients to allow them to make the best decisions about their own care, leading to better outcomes.

    Dr. Patel has published widely in topics such as avoiding complications in endoscopic sinus surgery, chronic rhinosinusitis in the immunosuppressed patient population, new devices and techniques for endoscopic skull base surgery, and olfactory dysfunction. She continues to perform research in these areas, and is beginning collaborative efforts with neuroscientists and engineers to develop technology that she hopes will eventually help cure patients with olfactory loss.

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