School of Medicine

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  • Theo Palmer

    Theo Palmer

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Members of the Palmer Lab study the biology of neural stem cells in brain development and in the adult. Our primary goal is to understand how genes and environment synergize in influencing stem cell behavior during development and how mild genetic or environmental risk factors for disease may synergize in their detrimental effects on brain development or in the risk of neuronal loss in age-related degenerative disease.

  • Alan C. Pao

    Alan C. Pao

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Urology at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the hormonal and signal transduction pathways that control epithelial ion transport. Our model system involves tight epithelia, typically found in the distal nephron of the kidney. Clinical implications of our work include a better understanding of the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension and hypertension associated with the insulin resistance syndrome.

  • KT Park

    KT Park

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinician investigator in the Department of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at Stanford University, and faculty associate with Stanford Health Policy. My current NIH-funded research focus is on the pharmaco-economics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The purpose of my research endeavors is to inform clinical practice by identifying optimal, patient-specific strategies in the treatment of IBD.

  • Karen J. Parker, PhD

    Karen J. Parker, PhD

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Parker Lab conducts research on the biology of social functioning in monkeys, typically developing humans, and patients with social impairments.

  • Julie Parsonnet

    Julie Parsonnet

    George DeForest Barnett Professor in Medicine and Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am an infectious diseases epidemiologist who has done large field studies in both the US and developing countries. We research the long-term consequences of chronic interactions between the human host and the microbial world. My lab has done fundamental work establishing the role of H. pylori in causing disease and understanding its epidemiology. Currently, our research dissects how and when children first encounter microbes and the long term effects of these exposures on health.

  • Sonia Partap

    Sonia Partap

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests involve the epidemiology, treatment and diagnosis of pediatric and young adult brain tumors. I am also interested in long-term neurologic effects and designing clinical trials to treat brain and spinal cord tumors.

  • Josef Parvizi MD PhD

    Josef Parvizi MD PhD

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr Parvizi completed his medical internship at Mayo Clinic and Neurology Residency at BIDMC Harvard Medical School before joining the UCLA for fellowship training in clinical neurophysiology and epilepsy. He has worked at Stanford University Medical Center since 2007 and specializes in treating patients with uncontrollable seizures. Dr. Parvizi is the principal investigator in the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience whose research activities have been supported by National Institute of Health, National Science Foundation, and private foundations. To find out more about Dr Parvizi's scholarly activities please visit

  • Sergiu P. Pasca

    Sergiu P. Pasca

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Disorder/Sleep Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests A critical challenge in understanding the intricate programs underlying development, assembly and dysfunction of the human brain is the lack of direct access to intact, functioning human brain tissue for detailed investigation by imaging, recording, and stimulation.
    Our lab is using pluripotent stem cells derived non-invasively from human individuals to generate in a dish specific regions of the human brain in a functional 3D preparation we have developed. We are using months-to-years long ?brain-a-dish? cultures (also known as brain region-specific organoids or spheroids) to understand how neurons find their final position in the brain and how they mature functionally. To investigate how different brain regions talk to each-other in normal and diseased states, we introduced a new approach for in vitro assembly of neural circuits, also known as assembloids.
    We employ state-of-the-art stem cell biology, genome engineering, imaging and neuroscience approaches to identify the dynamical processes that go awry in neural cells derived from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia, and what should be therapeutically targeted in these conditions.

  • Anisha I Patel

    Anisha I Patel

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Patel's research interests focus on reducing socioeconomic disparities in chronic diseases, including childhood obesity. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Patel has led numerous studies to encourage healthy beverage intake among children and adolescents. These studies include analyses of large national data sets, conduct of randomized controlled trials in schools, child care, and community settings to examine how interventions to increase children?s intake of water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages impact child health, and the evaluation of policy efforts to improve the healthfulness of beverages offered in schools and community settings.

    Dr. Patel has a diverse funding portfolio ranging from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Eating Research Program, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Patel has presented her research to local, national and international audiences. She has also been recognized for her research with awards from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill School of Public Health.

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