School of Medicine

Showing 1-10 of 16 Results

  • Maxence Nachury

    Maxence Nachury

    Assistant Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the primary cilium, a once-obscure cellular organelle recently "re-discovered" for its role in a number of signaling pathways. Defects in cilium biogenesis lead to a variety of hereditary disorders characterized by retinal degeneration, kidney cysts and obesity. Our goal is to characterize these disorders at the molecular and cellular levels to gain insight into the basic mechanisms of primary cilium biogenesis and to discover novel ciliary signaling pathways.

  • Seema Nagpal, MD

    Seema Nagpal, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Glioblastoma is an aggressive brain cancer with limited options for therapy. Currently, our group is looking to bring at least 2 new trials for treatment at the time of diagnosis and at recurrence to Stanford.

    The spread of systemic cancer, like lung and breast cancers, to the covering of the brain, is adevastating and often lethal complication. I am working to bring a trials for early detection and treatment to Stanford, with the and making this a unique focus of our new brain tumor center.

  • Yusuke Nakauchi M.D., Ph.D.

    Yusuke Nakauchi M.D., Ph.D.

    Postdoctoral Research fellow, Stanford Cancer Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests From 2005 to 2010, my work as a clinical hematology fellow allowed me to experience first-hand how scientific advances that started in a laboratory can transform the lives of patients. While many of my patients were cured of their disease with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, underscoring the importance of anti-tumor immunotherapy in eradicating leukemia, I witnessed face-to-face their suffering from the long-term consequence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This experience was ultimately what drove me to engage in research to discover novel therapies. For this reason, I embarked on a PhD program in 2010 to design antibody therapy to (i) target GVHD and (ii) target hematological malignancies. Under the mentorship of Professor Hiromitsu Nakauchi at the University of Tokyo, an international leader in hematopoiesis, I developed allele-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) monoclonal antibodies for severe GVHD caused by HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Nakauchi et al., Exp Hematol, 2015). This study was the first to find that anti-HLA antibodies can be used therapeutically against GVHD. That success gave me the motivation and confidence to further my research beyond targeting GVHD, to targeting leukemic stem cells through my current postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Professor Ravindra Majeti, Department of Hematology at Stanford University.

    Many people suffer from leukemia each year, but we still don?t know how to completely cure it. Recent advances in sequencing technologies have tremendously improved our understanding of the underlying mutations that drive hematologic malignancies, although, the reality is that the majority of the mutations are not easily ?druggable? and the discovery of these mutations has not yet made a significant impact in patient outcomes. I view this perhaps the most crucial challenges facing a translational cancer researcher like myself. My current research is a major step toward my long term goal to make personalized medicine a reality for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other hematologic malignancies. Although my research is focused on targeting Ten-Eleven Translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase-2 (TET2) mutations, I anticipate it will lead to a better understanding of the cell context requirement for TET2 mutations in AML and help identify the critical cells to target to both prevent the development of de novo leukemia and halt relapse. It may also prove of value to understanding of the biology of a range of other cancers.

  • Sandy Napel

    Sandy Napel

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Medical Informatics) and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research seeks to advance the clinical and basic sciences in radiology, while improving our understanding of biology and the manifestations of disease, by pioneering methods in the information sciences that integrate imaging, clinical and molecular data. A current focus is on content-based radiological image retrieval and integration of imaging features with clinical and molecular data for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapy planning decision support.

  • Anupama Narla

    Anupama Narla

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests are to study the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies and to translate these insights into the work-up and management of pediatric bone marrow failure syndromes.

  • Yasodha Natkunam, M.D., Ph.D

    Yasodha Natkunam, M.D., Ph.D

    Professor of Pathology at Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on the identification and characterization of markers of diagnostic and prognostic importance in hematolymphoid neoplasia.

  • Joel Neal, MD, PhD

    Joel Neal, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Applying new technologies to the diagnosis, characterization, and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

  • Robert Negrin

    Robert Negrin

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our labaratory focuses on the study of immune recognition by T and NK cells with special emphasis on graft vs host disease and graft vs tumor reactions. We utilize both murine and human systems in an effort to enhance graft vs tumor reactions while controlling graft vs host disease. We have developed bioluminescence models in collaboration with the Contag laboratory to study the trafficking of immune effector cells with a special emphasis on NK, T and regulatory T cells.

  • William Nelson

    William Nelson

    Rudy J. and Daphne Donohue Munzer Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research objectives are to understand the cellular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. Polarized epithelial cells play fundamental roles in the ontogeny and function of a variety of tissues and organs.

  • Bang Nguyen

    Bang Nguyen

    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Nguyen is interested in cancer prevention and control in ethnic and socio-economic underserved communities and health disparities.

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