School of Medicine


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  • Luis Fajardo

    Luis Fajardo

    Professor of Pathology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Radiation injury in mammalian tissues. Mechanisms of cerebral malaria. Effects of cytokines on angiogenesis.

  • Dean W. Felsher

    Dean W. Felsher

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory investigates how oncogenes initiate and sustain tumorigenesis. I have developed model systems whereby I can conditionally activate oncogenes in normal human and mouse cells in tissue culture or in specific tissues of transgenic mice. In particular using the tetracycline regulatory system, I have generated a conditional model system for MYC-induced tumors. I have shown that cancers caused by the conditional over-expression of the MYC proto-oncogene regress with its inactivation.

  • Marcelo Fernandez Vina

    Marcelo Fernandez Vina

    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Marcelo Fernßndez-Vi˝a, Ph.D., D (ABHI) is a Professor for the Department of Pathology at Stanford University Medical School and serves as co-Director of the Histocompatibility, Immunogenetics and Disease Profiling Laboratory at this institution. He has been working in the fields of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics since 1982. He earned a degree in Biochemistry from the School of Basic Sciences in Rosario, Argentina, and his Ph.D. in Internal Medicine from the University of Buenos Aires Medical School in Argentina. Previously he held a position as a Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. He has 170 peer reviewed publications, many of them focusing on HLA variation in multiple world populations, identifying susceptibility and resistance factors for diseases and in the impact of HLA mismatches in allogeneic transplantation; and 59 book chapters. He served as expert Consultant for Donor Searches for NMDP and as President Elect, President and Past President of the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. He served as a member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee for the United Network for Organ Sharing. Currently, he serves as Co-Chair of the Immunobiology Committee of the CIBMTR; and is the Liaison between the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics to the National Marrow Donor Program. He serves as HLA Expert Consultant for the NMDP for the HRSA contract and is a member of the Histocompatibility Advisory Group for NMDP. He is Councilor of the International Histocompatibility Workshop and a member of the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System and has been designated as Chairman of the next (17th) International Histocompatibility Workshop. He is Section Editor of Human Immunology and an Advisory Board Member of the International Journal of Immunogenetics.

  • Andrew Fire

    Andrew Fire

    George D. Smith Professor in Molecular and Genetic Medicine and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study natural cellular mechanisms for adapting to genetic change. These include systems activated during normal development and those for detecting and responding to foreign or unwanted genetic activity. Underlying these studies are questions of how a cells can distinguish information as "self" versus "nonself" or "wanted" versus "unwanted".

  • Ann Folkins

    Ann Folkins

    Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest is in gynecologic and obstetric pathology, specifically in the origin and pathogenesis of serous ovarian carcinoma and the diagnostic difficulties surrounding trophoblastic disorders and neoplasia in the placenta.

  • Steven Foung

    Steven Foung

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focus is on the early events of hepatitis C virus infection- virus attachment and entry into susceptible cells. The approach is through the generation and functional studies of human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) to the virus envelope proteins with an emphasis on antibodies to conformational epitopes.

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