School of Medicine


Showing 171-174 of 174 Results

  • Emmanuel During, MD

    Emmanuel During, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Improving diagnostics and therapeutics in RBD, using home ambulatory devices including wearable actigraphy, dry-EEG, to power clinical trials based on objective outcomes of RBD activity.

    Controlling symptoms of RBD testing drugs rigorously.

    Predicting the course of neurodegeneration using deep phenotyping using clinical and serum biomarkers, measures of autonomic impairment, skin biopsy, microbiome

  • Ram S Duriseti

    Ram S Duriseti

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Bio Ram's Doctoral background and academic interests are in in computational modeling of complex decisions, algorithm design and implementation, and data driven decision making. Outside of clinical work, his main competencies in this regard are software development, algorithm design and implementation, cost-effectiveness analysis, decision analysis through computational models. He has also collaborated with industry to create and deploy operation specific software involving statistical computing and reasoning under inference. He has been practicing clinical Emergency Medicine in both community and academic settings for over 20 years. At Stanford, he primarily works in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    https://www.shiftgen.com/about
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/ram-duriseti-991614/

  • Gozde Durmus

    Gozde Durmus

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Durmus' research focuses on applying micro/nano-technologies to investigate cellular heterogeneity for single-cell analysis and personalized medicine. At Stanford, she is developing platform technologies for sorting and monitoring cells at the single-cell resolution. This magnetic levitation-based technology is used for wide range of applications in medicine, such as, label-free detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood; high-throughput drug screening; and rapid detection and monitoring of antibiotic resistance in real-time. During her PhD, she has engineered nanoparticles and nanostructured surfaces to decrease antibiotic-resistant infections.

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