School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 11 Results

  • Eugene Carragee, MD

    Eugene Carragee, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Carragee's research interests lie in outcomes assessment of surgical and rehabilitative treatment for cervical and lumbar intervertebral disk herniation; diagnosis and treatment of spine infections, instrumentation of the degenerative spine and spinal deformities and low back pain syndromes, pain and pain management.

  • James Chang, MD

    James Chang, MD

    Professor of Surgery (Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My role in research is to apply novel advances in tissue engineering and microsurgery to the clinical problems of hand trauma, peripheral nerve injuries, and congenital hand problems. I am interested in developing new tissues and techniques that will allow optimal reconstruction of form and function to those patients requiring reconstructive surgery.

  • Ivan Cheng, MD

    Ivan Cheng, MD

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Cheng's research interests lie in the biologic enhancement of spinal fusions, molecular techniques of intervertebral disc regeneration, and techniques of spinal instrumentation. For more information, please go to http://www.ivanchengmd.com.

  • Emilie Cheung, MD

    Emilie Cheung, MD

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical outcomes following complex reconstruction of the shoulder and elbow,
    Bone mineral density in the shoulder,
    3D kinematics of the shoulder girdle after arthroplasty

  • Loretta Chou, MD

    Loretta Chou, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon, subspecializing in Disorders of the Foot and Ankle. My clinic offers diagnosis and treatment of pain, deformity, and acute injuries of the foot and ankle.


    My research interests include: rupture and tendinitis of the Achilles tendon, osteochondral defects of the talus, Total Ankle Arthroplasty, arthrodesis (fusion) of the foot and ankle, pain following operations of the foot and ankle, open fractures treated with operations, anatomy of the foot and

  • Constance Chu, MD

    Constance Chu, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery (Sports Medicine) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Bio Dr. Constance R. Chu is Professor and Vice Chair Research, in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Stanford University. She is also Director of the Joint Preservation Center and Chief of Sports Medicine at the VA Palo Alto. Previously, she was the Albert Ferguson Endowed Chair and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a clinician-scientist who is both principal investigator of several projects funded by the National Institutes of Health and who has been recognized as a Castle-Connelly/US News and World Report ?Top Doctor? in Orthopedic Surgery as well as on Becker?s list of Top Knee Surgeons in the United States. Her clinical practice focuses on the knee: primarily restoration and reconstruction of the ACL, menisci and cartilage. She graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School.

    As Director of the multi-disciplinary Joint Preservation Center structured to seamlessly integrate the latest advances in biologics, mechanics, and imaging with comprehensive patient centered musculoskeletal and orthopedic care, Dr. Chu aims to develop a new model for health care delivery, research and education with an emphasis on health promotion and prevention. Cornerstones of this program include teamwork and a focus on personalized medicine. A central goal is to transform the clinical approach to osteoarthritis from palliation to prevention. In addition to optimizing clinical operations, outstanding research is critical to developing more effective new treatments. Towards this end, Dr. Chu is leading innovative translational research from bench to bedside in three main areas: quantitative imaging and biomarker development for early diagnosis and staging of joint and cartilage injury and degeneration; cartilage tissue engineering and stem cell based cartilage repair; and molecular and biological therapies for joint restoration and joint rejuvenation. Her research efforts have led to more than 30 professional awards and honors to include a Kappa Delta Award, considered to be the highest research honor in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Dr. Chu also regularly holds leadership and committee positions in major professional organizations such as the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopedic Association (AOA). In her subspecialty of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, she is a past President of the Forum Sports Focus Group, a member of the Herodicus Society of leaders in Sports Medicine, and immediate past Chair of the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Research Council. She is alumnus of the AOA American, British, Canadian (ABC) and the AOSSM Traveling Fellowships.

  • John G. Costouros, MD, FACS

    John G. Costouros, MD, FACS

    Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Costouros specializes in the arthroscopic and open treatment of shoulder and elbow disorders derived from sports injuries, arthritis, fractures, compressive neuropathies, and failed prior surgeries. He has made significant award-winning research discoveries in the molecular etiology and treatment of arthritis and cartilage injuries.

    He has special expertise in the reverse total shoulder replacement, management of massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears, revision surgery, tendon transfers, fractures of the shoulder girdle, and the treatment of sports-related disorders and instability of the shoulder in overhead athletes using arthroscopic techniques.

    His research focuses on improving our understanding of cartilage injury and arthritis at the cellular level, specifically the development of methods to modulate programmed cell death or apoptosis. He also is involved in the development of cell-based strategies in improving outcomes following rotator cuff repair and better understanding the causes of rotator cuff disease.

    Dr. Costouros continues to be interested in the development of instruments to analyze surgical outcomes and the creation of registries which allow surgeons to better understand patient-specific outcomes, implant longevity, wear mechanisms, and how surgeons can consistently deliver the best results following shoulder and elbow surgery.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: