School of Medicine


Showing 91-100 of 145 Results

  • Noemi Andor

    Noemi Andor

    Instructor, Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on understanding the evolution of tumor cell populations, on how selective pressures, such as those imposed by chemo- and radiotherapies, favor the survival of one tumor cell population over another. Towards this goal I develop algorithms that measure intra-tumor heterogeneity from next-generation sequencing data or from more traditional diagnostic procedures, such as H&E stainings.
    My long-term goal is to develop an adaptable therapeutic strategy that vastly increases the number of alternative therapy options and that rationalizes therapy choice.

  • Katrin Andreasson

    Katrin Andreasson

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on understanding how immune responses initiate and accelerate synaptic and neuronal injury in age-related neurodegeneration, including models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We also focus on the role of immune responses in aggravating brain injury in models of stroke. Our goal is the identification of critical immune pathways that function in neurologic disorders and that can be targeted to elicit disease modifying effects.

  • Jason Andrews

    Jason Andrews

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory aims to develop and test innovative approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and control of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. We draw upon multiple fields including mathematical modeling, microbial genetics, field epidemiology, statistical inference and biodesign to work on challenging problems in infectious diseases, with an emphasis on tuberculosis and tropical diseases.

  • Jennifer Andrews, MD, MSc

    Jennifer Andrews, MD, MSc

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include: education of clinical residents and fellows regarding safe and effective transfusion practices, iron overload from red blood cell transfusions in pediatric hematology/oncology patients and leveraging technology to improve clinical practice around blood transfusion.

  • Lay Teng Ang

    Lay Teng Ang

    Instructor, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

    Bio As a stem cell biologist, my overall goal is to understand the mechanisms through which stem cells differentiate into progressively-specialized cell-types and to harness this knowledge to artificially generate pure populations of desired cell-types from stem cells. My work over the past 10 years has centered on pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, which include embryonic and pluripotent stem cells), which have the remarkable ability to generate any of the hundreds of diverse cell-types in the body. However, it has been notoriously difficult to guide PSCs to differentiate into a pure population of a given cell-type. Current differentiation strategies typically generate heterogeneous cell populations unsuitable for basic research or clinical applications. To address this challenge, I mapped the cascade of branching lineage choices through which PSCs differentiate into a variety of endodermal and mesodermal cell-types. I then developed effective methods to differentiate PSCs into specific lineages by providing the extracellular signal(s) that specify a given lineage while inhibiting the signals that induce the alternate fate(s), enabling the generation of highly-pure human heart, bone (Loh & Chen et al., 2016; Cell) and liver (Loh & Ang et al., 2014; Cell Stem Cell) from PSCs. In particular, I have focused on generating pure populations of liver progenitors from PSCs; these PSC-derived human liver progenitors regenerated human liver tissue, and improved the survival of, mouse models of liver failure (Ang et al., 2018; Cell Reports). My goal is to complete the preclinical development of PSC-derived liver progenitors as a potential cellular replacement therapy for liver failure. This project will be facilitated by my experience with PSC differentiation, assays of liver cell identity and function, and mouse models of liver failure.

    I earned my Ph.D. jointly from the University of Cambridge and A*STAR and was subsequently appointed as a Research Fellow, and later, a Senior Research Fellow, at the Genome Institute of Singapore. At Singapore, I was an independent group leader and received extramural funding support as PI or co-PI on three government grants. In April 2018, I moved my laboratory to Stanford University as a Siebel Investigator and Instructor at the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine.

    https://people.stanford.edu/layteng/

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: