School of Medicine


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  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Danielle DeSouza

    Danielle DeSouza

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. DeSouza is an Instructor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences. She completed her PhD at the University of Toronto where her research focused on MRI to examine brain abnormalities and treatment-related plasticity in individuals with the chronic facial pain disorder, trigeminal neuralgia.

    With her mentor, Dr. Robert Cowan, Dr. DeSouza is currently investigating the basic mechanisms and biomarkers associated with chronic daily headache subtypes using multimodal neuroimaging. In addition, she is a member of the Brain Stimulation Lab (BSL) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. With the Director of the BSL, Dr. Nolan Williams, and mentor, Dr. David Spiegel, Dr. DeSouza is involved in investigating the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on hypnotic analgesia.

    Her overall research goal is to combine multimodal neuroimaging approaches to understand the basic mechanisms and biomarkers underlying pain phenotypes and chronic pain disorders to inform individual treatment strategies.

  • Les Dorfman, MD

    Les Dorfman, MD

    Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical electrophysiology of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including nerve conduction velocity; electromyography (EMG); and visual, auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials. Multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and treatment. Neurological education.

  • Dawn Duane

    Dawn Duane

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a general pediatric neurologist. My interest is in clinical diagnosis and treatment of common neurologic diseases in pediatric patients and teaching feature doctors, neurologists and pediatric neurologists about pediatric neurology.

  • Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Translational research in the human application of emerging immunotherapies for neurological disease, focusing on Multiple Sclerosis, CIS, transverse myelitis and Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO). Collaborative research with Stanford and extramural scientific faculty to identify biomarkers of disease activity and treatment response in humans. Clinical trials to assess efficacy of emerging treatments for MS, CIS and NMO.

  • Emmanuel H. During, MD

    Emmanuel H. During, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine

    Bio Emmanuel H. During, M.D. is dually trained in neurology and psychiatry and specialized in sleep medicine. After completion of medical school at Louis Pasteur University and psychiatry residency in Paris, France, he relocated to the US to conduct neuroimaging research at NYU, New York. He then completed a second residency training in neurology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, and sleep medicine fellowship at Stanford University where he joined the faculty as clinical assistant professor and clinician educator with a dual appointment in neurology and sleep medicine.

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