School of Medicine


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  • Robert Baldwin

    Robert Baldwin

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I closed my laboratory when I retired in 1998. I continue to do research, chiefly in collaboration with Franc Avbelj, on problems of protein folding energetics, especially peptide backbone solvation, and to write reviews.

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Function of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Onn Brandman

    Onn Brandman

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Brandman Lab studies how cells ensure protein quality and how they signal stress. To achieve this, we employ an integrated set of techniques including single cell anaysis of stress pathways, structural studies, in vitro translation, and full genome screens in yeast and mammalian cells.

  • Douglas L. Brutlag

    Douglas L. Brutlag

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary interest is to understand the flow of information from the genome to the phenotype of an organism. This interest includes predicting the structure and function of genes and proteins from their primary sequence, predicting function from structure simulating protein folding and ligand docking, and predicitng disease from genome variations. These goals are the same as the goals of molecular biology, however, we use primarily computational approaches.

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