School of Medicine


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  • David Ansel

    David Ansel

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Bio I am a Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician (DBP) with clinical interests that include developmental delay, intellectual and learning disabilities, ADHD, autism, Asperger?s, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, tic disorders, and psychopharmacology.

    The first 28 years of my career were spent in clinical practice combining both DBP and primary care (the latter focused on serving CSHCN). During those years I was involved in numerous divide-bridging efforts - including programs to coordinate inpatient & outpatient medicine, connect tertiary & primary care, and promote teamwork between pediatricians, psychologists, nurse practitioners, and other community partners. I founded my own solo practice in 1989 and managed its growth to an 8-provider group over the next 25 years. Our practice was a founding member of the PPOC and I served on its board of directors for 6 years. The PPOC is one of the largest pediatric IPA?s in the country, with >200 member providers affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital. Over the years we've been involved in groundbreaking QI initiatives including those involving asthma, weight, and ADHD management; medical home; and behavioral health integration with primary care.

    I?m pleased now to have an opportunity for a ?second act? on the clinician-educator track here at Stanford. I hope to use my unique experience straddling primary care and sub-specialty worlds to develop programs supporting DB assessment and care inside the medical home generally, and across the Packard Children's Health Alliance primary care network in particular.

  • Ronald L. Ariagno

    Ronald L. Ariagno

    Professor (Clinical) of Pediatrics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Developmental Physiology and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Research Laboratory for Clinical Investigation was closed in 2008.
    My current focus is to work with the FDA to promote the neonatal science needed for drug and device development on infants.

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