Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Fellow
  • Pediatric Anesthesia
  • Perioperative Management

Honors & Awards


  • Chief Resident, Baylor College of Medicine Department of Anesthesia (2019-2020)
  • Best Research Presentation, Baylor Anesthesia Research Symposium (2019)
  • Resident Research Fellow, Foundation for Anesthesia Education and Research (FAER) (2018)
  • Medical Student Anesthesia Research Fellow, Foundation for Anesthesia Education and Research (FAER) (2015)
  • Top 3 Finalists, International Emory Global Health Case Competition (2015)
  • Winner, University of Miami Business Plan Competition (2015)
  • Class President and Commencement Speaker, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2008)
  • Excellence in Foreign Languages and Literature Award, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2007)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Resident Component Vice-Chair, Texas Society of Anesthesiologists (2018 - 2019)
  • Member, Gold Humanism Honor Society (2016 - Present)
  • Member, American Society of Anesthesiologists (2015 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Bachelor of Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Management Science, Applied International Studies (2008)
  • MBA, University of Miami School of Business, Health Sector Management and Policy (2015)
  • Doctor of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Medicine (2016)
  • Residency, Baylor College of Medicine, Anesthesiology (2020)
  • Fellowship, Stanford University / Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Pediatric Anesthesiology

Community and International Work


  • Volunteer Medical-Surgical Mission, Nicaragua, Managua

    Topic

    Preventative medicine

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Nicaragua Medical Missions

    Populations Served

    underserved communities

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Volunteer Medical-Surgical Mission, Guatemala

    Topic

    Pediatric anesthesiology in developing countries

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Faith in Practice

    Populations Served

    Underserved children

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Publications

All Publications


  • Cost-benefit Analysis of Maintaining a Fully Stocked Malignant Hyperthermia Cart versus an Initial Dantrolene Treatment Dose for Maternity Units. Anesthesiology Ho, P. T., Carvalho, B., Sun, E. C., Macario, A., Riley, E. T. 2018

    Abstract

    The Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States recommends that dantrolene be available for administration within 10 min. One approach to dantrolene availability is a malignant hyperthermia cart, stocked with dantrolene, other drugs, and supplies. However, this may not be of cost benefit for maternity units, where triggering agents are rarely used.The authors performed a cost-benefit analysis of maintaining a malignant hyperthermia cart versus a malignant hyperthermia cart readily available within the hospital versus an initial dantrolene dose of 250 mg, on every maternity unit in the United States. A decision-tree model was used to estimate the expected number of lives saved, and this benefit was compared against the expected costs of the policy.We found that maintaining a malignant hyperthermia cart in every maternity unit in the United States would reduce morbidity and mortality costs by $3,304,641 per year nationally but would cost $5,927,040 annually. Sensitivity analyses showed that our results were largely driven by the extremely low incidence of general anesthesia. If cesarean delivery rates in the United States remained at 32% of all births, the general anesthetic rate would have to be greater than 11% to achieve cost benefit. The only cost-effective strategy is to keep a 250-mg dose of dantrolene on the unit for starting therapy.It is not of cost benefit to maintain a fully stocked malignant hyperthermia cart with a full supply of dantrolene within 10 min of maternity units. We recommend that hospitals institute alternative strategies (e.g., maintain a small supply of dantrolene on the maternity unit for starting treatment).

    View details for PubMedID 29672336

  • Prevalence of mutations in GJB2, SLC26A4, and mtDNA in children with severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss in southwestern China. Genetic testing and molecular biomarkers Qing, J., Zhou, Y., Lai, R., Hu, P., Ding, Y., Wu, W., Xiao, Z., Ho, P. T., Liu, Y., Liu, J., Du, L., Yan, D., Goldstein, B. J., Liu, X., Xie, D. 2015; 19 (1): 52–58

    Abstract

    To study the distribution characteristics of common mutations in the GJB2, SLC26A4, and mtDNA genes in children with severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in southwestern China.A total of 1,164 individuals were recruited to screen for the common GJB2, SLC26A4, and mtDNA mutations by microarrays. Subsequencing for the coding region of the GJB2 gene in the samples without the GJB2 hotspot mutations as well as subsequencing for the exon 1 of the TRMU gene in those samples with the mtDNA hotspot mutations was performed by Sanger sequencing. All mutations were analyzed in association with medical imaging.In this study, 28.43% of all subjects carried mutations. The mutation frequencies in the GJB2, SLC26A4, and mtDNA genes were 17.27%, 7.04%, and 4.12%, respectively. No TRMU mutation was found in the study. The frequency of the mtDNA mutations in the multiethnic minorities was six times that in the Han (11.23% vs. 1.91%; p approaches 0.000) and in the urban group was one-third of that in the suburban group(1.49% vs. 4.47%; p=0.047). The frequency of the GJB2 mutations in urban and suburban groups was 23.38% and 15.99%, respectively (p=0.012). The enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) was the most common inner ear malformation and ∼79.10% of EVA cases were associated with the SLC26A4 mutations.More than one-fourth of children with severe or profound SNHL carried the common deafness mutations. The proportions of ethnic minorities and urban subjects could impact the frequency of the GJB2 and mtDNA mutations. The SLC26A4 hotspot mutations are prevalent and correlate strongly with EVA.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/gtmb.2014.0241

    View details for PubMedID 25493717

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4278079

  • Mechanotransduction channels of the trabecular meshwork. Current eye research Tran, V. T., Ho, P. T., Cabrera, L., Torres, J. E., Bhattacharya, S. K. 2014; 39 (3): 291–303

    Abstract

    To determine whether the trabecular meshwork (TM), like the other organs engaged in filter like activities (such as kidneys), show the expression of known mechanotransduction channels at protein level.Human donor eye globes (n = 20), Donor eye derived TM tissue and primary TM cells were utilized for these studies. Commercially available antibodies to channels, immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry, Western blot and mass spectrometric analyses were performed to determine the presence of mechanosensitive channels at protein level. The study was performed adhering to tenets of declaration of Helsinki.We demonstrate here the presence of 11 mechanotransduction channels (Piezo1, Piezo2, TASK1, TREK1, TRPA1, TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC3, TRPC6, TRPM2, TRPP2) as expressed protein in the TM tissue and at the isolated TM cell level. Presence of at least one known isoform of these channels was demonstrated using Western blot analyses.We demonstrated the presence of 11 mechanotransduction channels in the TM and in isolated TM cells at protein level. Demonstration of these channels as proteins at tissue and cellular level will pave the way for further experimentation.

    View details for DOI 10.3109/02713683.2013.842593

    View details for PubMedID 24215462

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