Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

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  • Naloxone Distribution and Training for Patients with High-Risk Opioid Use in a Veterans Affairs Community-Based Primary Care Clinic. The Permanente journal Raffel, K. E., Beach, L. Y., Lin, J. n., Berchuck, J. E., Abram, S. n., Markle, E. n., Patel, S. n. 2018; 22

    Abstract

    Naloxone distribution has historically been implemented in a community-based, expanded public health model; however, there is now a need to further explore primary care clinic-based naloxone delivery to effectively address the nationwide opioid epidemic.To create a general medicine infrastructure to identify patients with high-risk opioid use and provide 25% of this population with naloxone autoinjector prescription and training within a 6-month period.The quality improvement study was conducted at an outpatient clinic serving 1238 marginally housed veterans with high rates of comorbid substance use and mental health disorders. Patients at high risk of opioid-related adverse events were identified using the Stratification Tool for Opioid Risk Management and were contacted to participate in a one-on-one, 15-minute, hands-on naloxone training led by nursing staff.The number of patients identified at high risk and rates of naloxone training/distribution.There were 67 patients identified as having high-risk opioid use. None of these patients had been prescribed naloxone at baseline. At the end of the intervention, 61 patients (91%) had been trained in the use of naloxone. Naloxone was primarily distributed by licensed vocational nurses (42/61, 69%).This study demonstrates the feasibility of high-risk patient identification and of a primary care-based and nursing-championed naloxone distribution model. This delivery model has the potential to provide access to naloxone to a population of patients with opioid use who may not be engaged in mental health or specialty care.

    View details for PubMedID 29616917

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5882191

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

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