Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Bio

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, Seoul National University (2016)
  • Bachelor of Science, Seoul National University (2008)

Stanford Advisors


  • Mark Kay, Postdoctoral Faculty Sponsor

Publications

All Publications


  • A Leu(CAG)-tRNA derived small RNA regulates ribosomal protein S28 after translation initiation in both human and mouse liver cancers Kim, H., Xu, J., Chu, K., Park, H., jang, H., Li, P., Valdmanis, P., Zhang, Q., Kay, M. AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH. 2020
  • Proteins Complex of the Fanconi Anemia Pathway as Determinant of AAV-Mediated Genomic Targeted Integration Puzzo, F., de Alencastro, G., Pavel-Dinu, M., Zhang, F., Pillay, S., Majzoub, K., Tiffany, M., Jang, H., Sheikali, A., Cromer, K. M., Meetei, R., Carette, J. E., Porteus, M. H., Pekrun, K., Kay, M. A. CELL PRESS. 2020: 459
  • A tRNA-Derived Small RNA Regulates Ribosomal Protein S28 Protein Levels after Translation Initiation in Humans and Mice. Cell reports Kim, H. K., Xu, J., Chu, K., Park, H., Jang, H., Li, P., Valdmanis, P. N., Zhang, Q. C., Kay, M. A. 2019; 29 (12): 3816

    Abstract

    tRNA-derived small RNAs (tsRNAs) have been implicated in many cellular processes, yet the detailed mechanisms are not well defined. We previously found that the 3' end of Leu-CAG tRNA-derived small RNA (LeuCAG3'tsRNA) regulates ribosome biogenesis in humans by maintaining ribosomal protein S28 (RPS28) levels. The tsRNA binds to coding (CDS) and non-coding 3' UTR sequence in the RPS28 mRNA, altering its secondary structure and enhancing its translation. Here we report that the functional 3' UTR target site is present in primates while the CDS target site is present in many vertebrates. We establish that this tsRNA also regulates mouse Rps28 translation by interacting with the CDS target site. We further establish that the change in mRNA translation occurred at a post-initiation step in both species. Overall, our results suggest that LeuCAG3'tsRNA might maintain ribosome biogenesis through a conserved gene regulatory mechanism in vertebrates.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.11.062

    View details for PubMedID 31851915

  • Amino-Acylated LeuCAG3 ' tsRNA Mediates Translational Elongation of Ribosomal Protein S28 mRNA and is a Key Regulatory Step in Ribosome Biogenesis Kim, H., Liu, Z., Xu, J., Chu, K., Park, H., Jang, H., Li, P., Valdmanis, P., Zhang, Q., Kay, M. CELL PRESS. 2019: 302
Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

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