Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 41 Results

  • Doug Owens

    Doug Owens

    Henry J. Kaiser, Jr. Professor, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research uses decision modeling, cost-effectiveness analysis, and meta-analysis to evaluate clinical and health policy problems. Much of my work involves development of national guidelines for prevention and treatment.

  • Sherri Rose

    Sherri Rose

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Outcomes Research)

    Bio Sherri Rose, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at Stanford University in the Center for Health Policy and Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research. She is also Co-Director of the Health Policy Data Science Lab. Her research is centered on developing and integrating innovative statistical machine learning approaches to improve human health. Within health policy, Dr. Rose works on risk adjustment, comparative effectiveness research, and health program evaluation. She has published interdisciplinary projects across varied outlets, including Biometrics, Journal of the American Statistical Association, Journal of Health Economics, Health Affairs, and New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Rose is the Co-Editor of Biostatistics and Chair of the American Statistical Association?s Biometrics Section.

    Her honors include an NIH Director's New Innovator Award, the ISPOR Bernie J. O'Brien New Investigator Award, and Mid-Career Awards from the American Statistical Association?s Health Policy Statistics Section and Penn-Rutgers Center for Causal Inference. Dr. Rose was also named a Fellow of the American Statistical Association in 2020. Her research has been featured in The New York Times, USA Today, and The Boston Globe. In 2011, Dr. Rose coauthored the first book on machine learning for causal inference, with a sequel text released in 2018.

    Dr. Rose comes from a low-income background and is committed to increasing diversity in the mathematical and health sciences. She has been a faculty mentor in the Math Alliance?s Facilitated Graduate Applications Program and summer research programs for undergraduate students from underrepresented backgrounds, among other initiatives.

  • Joshua Salomon

    Joshua Salomon

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Outcomes Research) and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Bio Joshua Salomon is a Professor of Medicine and a core faculty member in the Center for Health Policy and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His research focuses on public health policy and priority-setting, within three main substantive areas: (1) modeling patterns and trends in major causes of global mortality and disease burden; (2) evaluation of health interventions and policies; and (3) measurement and valuation of health outcomes.

    Dr. Salomon is an investigator on projects funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, relating to modeling of infectious and chronic diseases and associated intervention strategies; methods for economic evaluation of public health programs; measurement of the global burden of disease; and assessment of the potential impact and cost effectiveness of new health technologies.

    He is Director of the Prevention Policy Modeling Lab, which is a multi-institution research consortium that conducts health and economic modeling relating to infectious disease. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Dr. Salomon was Professor of Global Health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

    For more information on the Prevention Policy Modeling Lab visit ppml.stanford.edu. Follow on Twitter @SalomonJA.

  • Megha Shankar

    Megha Shankar

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Primary Care and Outcomes Research

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Shankar's scholarly work focuses on social justice and women's health, including postpartum transitions to primary care, reproductive justice, racial justice, and medical education. She is interested in mixed-methods research with a qualitative focus. She works with the VA Women's Health Evaluation Initiative and the Presence 5 Research Team. Her teaching experience involves health disparities, medical anthropology, women's health, refugee health, (dis)ability, and intersectionality.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

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