School of Medicine


Showing 51-96 of 96 Results

  • LAWRENCE McGLYNN

    LAWRENCE McGLYNN

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Methamphetamine Abuse
    HIV Neuropsychiatry

  • Mark McGovern

    Mark McGovern

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use innovations from implementation science to improve public access to effective treatments for all health problems and especially behavioral health problems, including addiction and mental health disorders. Our credo is NO HEALTH WITHOUT BEHAVIORAL HEALTH. Our goal is to enhance a person's chances for the best outcomes possible, including a lifetime of recovery. We embrace our leadership role to advance the science of implementation and mentor the next generation of researchers.

  • M Windy McNerney, PhD

    M Windy McNerney, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) [Vapahcs], Psych/General Psychiatry and Psychology (Adult)

    Bio Dr. M. Windy McNerney is Research Health Specialist in the MIRECC the VA Palo Alto, and a Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) at Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford School of Medicine. She earned her PhD from the University of Notre Dame, went on to a postdoctoral position and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (DOE), and then completed fellowship at the WRIISC program at the VA and Stanford University.

    Dr. McNerney is primarily interested in the neurophysiology and biochemistry of brain and mental health diseases, especially degenerative diseases, depression, TBI, PTSD, and addiction. She is collaborating with researchers to integrate brain imaging and biochemical markers in hopes to better understand these diseases. She also is taking a lead role in investigating the biochemistry of magnetic brain stimulation. She is currently teaching two classes at Stanford, entitled ?Addictions in Our World: From Physiology to Human Behavior,? and "The Opioid Epidemic: Using Neuroscience to Inform Policy and Law", which discuss the societal implications of addiction from a neurophysiological prospective.

    Selected Publications:

    McNerney, M. W., Hobday, T., Cole, B., Ganong R., Winas, N., Matthews, D., Hood, J., & Lane, S. (2019). Objective classification of mTBI using machine learning on a combination of frontal electroencephalography measurements and self-reported symptoms. Sports Medicine Open, 4, 14.

    Heath, A., Taylor, J.L., & McNerney, M. W. (2018). rTMS for Alzheimer's diseases: where should we be stimulating? Expert Rev Neurother, 18, 903.

    McNerney, M. W., Sheng, T., Nechvatal, J. M., Lee, A. G., Lyons, D. M., ... Adamson, M. M. (2018). Integration of neural and epigenetic contributions to posttraumatic stress symptoms: The role of hippocampal volume and glucocorticoid receptor gene methylation. PLOSONE, e0192222.

    Mi, Z., Biswas, K., Fairchild, K., Davis-Karim, A., Phibbs, C., Forman, S., Thase, M., Georgette, G., Beale, R., Pittman, D., McNerney, M. W., Rosen, A., Huang, G., George, M., Noda, A., & Yesavage, J. (2017). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for treatment-resistant major depression (TRMD) patients: Rational and design of a trail focusing on Veterans. Trails, 18, 409.

    Bennion, B. J., Be, N. A., McNerney, M. W., Lao V., Carlson E., Valdez, C. A., et al. (2017). Predicting a drug?s membrane permeability: A computational model validated with in vitro permeability assay data. Journal of Physical Chemistry, B, 121, 5228-5237.

    Ghasemi, M., Phillips C., Fahimi, A., McNerney M. W., & Salehi, A. (2017). Mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy of NMDA receptor modulators in mood disorders. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 13, 555-572.

    See more publications at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=McNerney%20MW%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=17107728

  • Martin Stefan Mumenthaler

    Martin Stefan Mumenthaler

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio Martin Mumenthaler has a PharmD and a PhD in psychopharmacology from the University of Bern, Switzerland. He holds an appointment as Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has been conducting research programs in addiction medicine and psychopharmacology, and teaching and mentoring medical students and residents on a voluntary basis.
    Dr. Mumenthaler has also been working in various full-time positions in the pharmaceutical industry as Director in Clinical Development as well as in Medical Affairs, and as a consultant for early-stage pharma- and biotech companies providing advice on designing and conducting clinical trials, and analyzing and interpreting study results, mainly in the field of addiction medicine and pain.
    His academic research has focused on the effects of psychoactive drugs on human performance, Aerospace Medicine, Alzheimer?s disease, and addiction medicine, and in these areas he has presented his results internationally and published over twenty-five peer-reviewed scientific articles. He has also served as a reviewer for various scientific journals, and is a member of the Research Society on Alcoholism, and an Associate Fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association.

  • Ruth O'Hara

    Ruth O'Hara

    Director, Spectrum, Senior Associate Dean, Research and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. O'Hara's research aims to investigate how cognitive information processing deficits subserve affective symptoms in psychiatric disorders, and interact with key brain networks integral to these disorders. To do so, she has implemented a translational, interdisciplinary program that encompasses cellular models, brain and behavioral assays of affective and cognitive information processing systems in psychiatric disorders across the lifespan.

  • Maurice M. Ohayon

    Maurice M. Ohayon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Main focus is epidemiology of sleep and psychiatric disorders in the general population and clinical settings: 1)sleep habits and patterns; 2) prevalence, diagnosis, co-morbidity, treatment and Public Health impact of sleep disorders; 3) pain, posttraumatic stress disorder, social phobia, panic disorder and generalized anxiety; 4) epidemiology of narcolepsy and hypersomnia.

  • Oxana Palesh

    Oxana Palesh

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research focused on developing interventions for management of side effects of cancer treatments (e.g., sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, anxiety).

  • Daryn Reicherter

    Daryn Reicherter

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Reicherter the director of the Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Laboratory.

    He has expertise in the area of cross-cultural trauma psychiatry, having spent more than a decade dedicated to providing a combination of administrative and clinical services in trauma mental health locally and internationally. He is on the List of Experts for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and for the United Nations? International Criminal Court. He is on the Fulbright Specialists Roster for his work in international trauma mental health. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Innovations in Global Health at Stanford University. He has created and cultivated new clinical rotations for residency education and medical school education in the community clinics that he operates. And he has created new opportunities for resident, medical student, and undergraduate education in Global Mental Health.

    He has also been involved in the creation of clinical mental health programs for underserved populations in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is the Faculty Adviser for the Stanford?s Free Clinic Mental Health Program.

    After receiving degrees in Psychobiology and Philosophy from the University of California at Santa Cruz, Dr. Reicherter completed his doctorate in medicine at New York Medical College. He completed internship and residency and served as Chief Resident at Stanford University Hospitals and Clinics.

  • Carolyn Rodriguez

    Carolyn Rodriguez

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Bio Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez leads studies investigating the brain basis of severe mental disorders. Her landmark clinical trials pioneer rapid-acting treatments for illnesses including Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). As the Director of the Translational Therapeutics Lab and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dr. Rodriguez has developed methods that combine in vivo drug infusions with magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalograpy to map human brain circuit dysfunction in real time.

    As a psychiatrist, neuroscientist, and clinical researcher, Carolyn?s NIH-, foundation-, and donor-funded mechanistic and clinical efficacy studies span targeted glutamatergic and opioid pathway pharmacotherapy, non-invasive brain stimulation, and psychotherapy for OCD, PTSD, and hoarding disorder. Additional studies focus on understanding the basic neuroscience mechanisms of repetitive behaviors. Carolyn also provides mental health care for Veterans as a consultation-liaison psychiatrist at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs.

    Carolyn serves as Associate Chair for Inclusion and Diversity in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford, Deputy Editor of The American Journal of Psychiatry, Vice Chair for the Research Council of the American Psychiatric Association, and Co-Chair of the International OCD Foundation Research Symposium. She has won several national awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE recognizes investigators who are pursuing bold and innovative projects at the early stages of their careers and is considered one of the highest honors in scientific research. Carolyn presented her research at the World Economic Forum in Davos, and her work has been highlighted by organizations including NPR, PBS, New York Times, ABC News, NBC News, Newsweek, and Time.com. She contributes articles to Harvard Business Review and Huffington Post to share scientific findings with the public.

    Carolyn received her B.S. in Computer Science from Harvard University, followed by a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Genetics from Harvard Medical School and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School-M.I.T. Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, she now lives with her husband and three children in Palo Alto.

  • Allyson Rosen, Ph.D.

    Allyson Rosen, Ph.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated) [Vapahcs], Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio RESEARCH FOCUS
    Translational cognitive neuroscience of aging and dementia. Neuroethics.

    TRAINING
    Dr. Rosen is board certified in clinical neuropsychology with a geriatric focus. She completed college at Brown University, a clinical psychology Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University, clinical neuropsychology internship at the Long Island Jewish Hospital in New York, and clinical neuropsychology postdoctoral fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Rosen completed specialty research fellowship training at the National Institute on Aging (Intramural Research Training Award) and Stanford (NRSA F32, K01) in functional imaging and noninvasive brain stimulation with support from NIA.

    CLINICAL AND RESEARCH ACTIVITIES
    Dr. Rosen is Director of Dementia Education at the Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center at the Palo Alto VAHCS. She is also a neuropsychologist and part of the consensus clinical group and education core at the Stanford?s Alzheimer?s Disease Research Center (NIA). Dr. Rosen?s funded research has focused on applying cognitive neuroscience of aging to improve clinical practice in older adults by using cognitive measures, brain imaging, and noninvasive brain stimulation such as TMS. Studies include using fMRI as an outcome measure for cognitive training, studying how to improve the accuracy of transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting with and without image guidance, and using structural MRI to avoid postoperative cognitive decline and improve outcome from carotid vascular procedures. She has a longstanding commitment to neuroethics and leads a feature in the Journal of Alzheimer Disease that focuses on ethical issues in new and emerging AD applications.

    ETHICS EDITOR, JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
    Ethics Review
    http://www.j-alz.com/blogs/discussion/protecting-progress

    MIRECC DEMENTIA EDUCATION
    http://www.mirecc.va.gov/visn21/education/dementia_education.asp

  • Craig S. Rosen

    Craig S. Rosen

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research aims at improving processes and outcomes of mental health care for veterans other people suffering from post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders.

    My primary focus is improving access to evidence-based treatments PTSD and other psychiatric disorders. My second emphasis is using telemedicine technologies to expand access to effective care. My third interest is measurement-based care, using ongoing data on patient progress to inform patients' and clinicians' decisions.

  • Ahmad Salehi Najaf Abadi

    Ahmad Salehi Najaf Abadi

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio Dr. Salehi is a neurobiologist working on identifying molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome. In this process, ?he uses pre-clinical experiments to test the effects of already-approved drugs in improving cognitive function in the mouse models with hippocampal degeneration. In 2010, he received the World Technology Award for the innovative use of mouse models of Down syndrome to identify genes responsible for cognitive disabilities. Recently, he found that increasing beta2 adrenergic signaling would improve cognitive function in a mouse model of Down syndrome. Accordingly, in a collaborative study, he is testing whether already-approved beta2-adrenergic receptor agonists can indeed improve cognitive function and reduce the severity of pathology in individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer?s disease.

    Selected Publications

    Dang V, Medina B, Das D, Moghadam S, Martin KJ, Lin B, Naik P, Patel D, Nosheny R, Wesson Ashford J, Salehi A. Formoterol, a long-acting ?2 adrenergic agonist, improves cognitive function and promotes dendritic complexity in a mouse model of Down syndrome. Biol Psychiatry. 2014 Feb 1;75(3):179-88. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.05.024. PMID: 23827853

    Salehi A, Faizi M, Colas D, Valletta J, Laguna J, Takimoto-Kimura R, Kleschevnikov A, Wagner SL, Aisen P, Shamloo M, Mobley WC. Restoration of norepinephrine-modulated contextual memory in a mouse model of Down syndrome. Sci Transl Med. 2009 Nov 18;1(7):7ra17. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3000258.? ?PMID: 20368182
    Salehi A, Delcroix JD, Belichenko PV, Zhan K, Wu C, Valletta JS, Takimoto-Kimura R, Kleschevnikov AM, Sambamurti K, Chung PP, Xia W, Villar A, Campbell WA, Kulnane LS, Nixon RA, Lamb BT, Epstein CJ, Stokin GB, Goldstein LS, Mobley WC. Increased App expression in a mouse model of Down's syndrome disrupts NGF transport and causes cholinergic neuron degeneration. Neuron. 2006 Jul 6;51(1):29-42.? ?PMID: 16815330

    Salehi A, Delcroix JD, Belichenko PV, Zhan K, Wu C, Valletta JS, Takimoto-Kimura R, Kleschevnikov AM, Sambamurti K, Chung PP, Xia W, Villar A, Campbell WA, Kulnane LS, Nixon RA, Lamb BT, Epstein CJ, Stokin GB, Goldstein LS, Mobley WC.Increased App expression in a mouse model of Down's syndrome disrupts NGF transport and causes cholinergic neuron degeneration.
    Neuron. 2006 Jul 6;51(1):29-42.

    Links:
    Lab: www.ahmadsalehi.info
    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ahmadsalehi1/
    Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Wr3FcsEAAAAJ&hl=en

  • Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) [Vapahcs], Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio The overarching aim of Dr. Scanlon?s research is to develop and evaluate low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. To that end, the Caregiver Technology Division of the Scanlon Lab aims to enhance patient- and family-centered care through novel, broadly customizable, and highly scalable caregiver interventions. In parallel, the Neurodegenerative Division of the Scanlon Lab focuses on the development and application of cognitive, neuropsychiatric, and biological markers for the initiation and progression of neurodegeneration.

    Dr. Scanlon received his bachelor?s degree in Neuroscience and doctorate in Clinical Health Psychology from the University of Miami. After concluding his clinical internship in Geropsychology/Neuropsychology at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS), he completed fellowships in Aging and Dementia at Stanford University School of Medicine and VAPAHCS. Dr. Scanlon is currently a VA Career Development Awardee in the Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) and Stanford/VA Aging Clinical Research Center where his work focuses on developing and evaluating low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. He also serves as Co-Director of the Stanford/VA California Alzheimer's Disease Center, Chair of the VAPAHCS Dementia Committee, and Co-Chair of the Department of Veterans Affairs VISN 21 Dementia Committee.

  • Logan Schneider

    Logan Schneider

    Staff, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests From a research perspective, my long-term career plan is to refine the understanding of normal and dysfunctional sleep, much like the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) and Epi4K are doing for the enigmatic epilepsies. Insufficient sleep has been deemed a public health problem with poorly understood behavioral and physiologic sleep disorders lying at the core of the issue. I am currently using well-defined distinct and objective phenotypes (e.g. periodic limb movements, hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy) to acquire the analytic skills necessary to expand my knowledge of both signal processing and genetics, with the former enhancing my ability to identify and/or refine sleep phenotypes, and the latter facilitating the pathophysiological understanding of these phenotypes. As a consequence of a better link between symptoms/phenotypes, physiology, and genetic risks, more personally targeted and effective therapeutics can be developed to address the enriched spectrum of sleep disorders.

  • Eric Stice

    Eric Stice

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Stice served as an assistant professor and associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin and as a Senior Research Scientist at Oregon Research Institute before joining the faculty at Stanford University. His research focuses on identifying risk factors that predict onset of eating disorders, obesity, substance abuse, and depression to advance knowledge regarding etiologic processes, including the use of functional neural imaging. He also designs, evaluates, and disseminates prevention and treatment interventions for eating disorders, obesity, and depression. For instance, he developed a dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program that has been implemented with over 4 million young girls in 139 countries. He has published 297 articles in high-impact outlets, including Science, Psychological Bulletin, Archives of General Biological Psychiatry, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and Journal of Neuroscience.

  • Dolores Gallagher Thompson, PhD, ABPP

    Dolores Gallagher Thompson, PhD, ABPP

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current research focuses on use of technology to improve mental health of older persons and their family members. I have a strong interest in how cultural diversity impacts mental health access, services, and outcomes. I am currently involved in several international research and demonstration projects in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the health care system in Thailand as well as projects in the US - notably, with rural caregivers and those of Asian American ancestry.

  • Jared R Tinklenberg

    Jared R Tinklenberg

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Psychopharmacology of dementia and Alzheimer's disease;, biological correlates of Alzheimer's disease; sexual dysfunction in, Alzheimer's disease; memory disorders.

  • Ranak Trivedi

    Ranak Trivedi

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Enhancing the role of informal caregivers in chronic disease self-management; assessment and treatment of mental illness in primary care settings; psychosocial antecedents and consequences of cardiovascular disease.

  • Andrea Varias

    Andrea Varias

    Casual - Non-Exempt, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Current Role at Stanford Serving member on the Lab?s Leadership Executive Team as lead clinical research coordinator for studies involving individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and anxiety-related disorders (including Hoarding Disorder and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder)

    ? Conversant in goals, mission and priorities of the Lab and University as primary contact for sponsors, regulatory agencies, Clinical Trials Research Unit, and study participants.
    ? Demonstrates a high degree of professionalism, initiative and flexibility while managing and auditing all aspects of clinical trials, including development, study start-up, implementation, compliance, and closure of IRB- and FDA-regulated studies.
    ? Leads a 10-person team of research coordinators and undergraduate assistants focused on research projections/goals, protocol management, and adverse event reporting.

  • Nina Vasan, MD, MBA

    Nina Vasan, MD, MBA

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mental illness is the greatest thief of human potential today. By harnessing the power of medicine, entrepreneurship, and technology, we can return that potential to the 2 billion people suffering around the world.

    Brainstorm is the world's first academic laboratory dedicated to transforming mental health through innovation and entrepreneurship.

  • Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overarching goal of my program of research is to determine how to facilitate the high quality delivery of evidence-based psychosocial interventions (EBPs) in public sector mental health settings. Areas of emphasis include training and consultation, treatment fidelity and adaptation, and the identification of strategies that promote sustained implementation of EBPs. .

  • Jerome Yesavage

    Jerome Yesavage

    Jared and Mae Tinklenberg Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study cognitive processes and aging in our research center. Studies range from molecular biology to neuropsychology of cognitive processes.

  • Kei Yoshimatsu

    Kei Yoshimatsu

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Kei Yoshimatsu, MD, is an adjunct clinical faculty member within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. His clinical interests include community and public psychiatry, homeless mental health, as well as LGBTQ mental health. He has completed his residency and fellowship at University of California, San Francisco.

  • Lindsey Eileen Zimmerman

    Lindsey Eileen Zimmerman

    Affiliate, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio Lindsey Zimmerman, PhD, is a Clinical and Community Psychologist, and Implementation Scientist at the National Center for PTSD, Dissemination and Training Division of the Veterans Health Administration.

    Dr. Zimmerman is principal investigator of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Veterans Health Administration (VA) research that enlists participatory system dynamics to increase timely patient access to evidence-based pharmacotherapy and evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, PTSD, alcohol and opioid use disorder. See https://mtl.how/team



    Active NIH Grants

    Participatory System Dynamics vs Audit and Feedback: A Cluster Randomized Trial of Mechanisms Of Implementation Change to Expand Reach of Evidence-Based Addiction and Mental Health Care (R01DA046651)

    The most common reasons Veterans seek VA addiction and mental health care is for help with opioid and alcohol misuse, depression and PTSD. Research evidence has established highly effective treatments that prevent relapse, overdose and suicide, but even with policy mandates, performance metrics, and electronic health records to fix the problem, these treatments may only reach 3-28% of patients. This study tests participatory business engineering methods to better meet the addiction and mental health needs of Veterans and the U.S. population.


    Participatory System Dynamics for Evidence-Based Addiction and Mental Healthcare (R21DA042198)

    Limited access and delays to high-quality, evidence-based mental health and addiction treatments can lead to patients getting too little or ineffective care and contribute to chronic patient impairment, relapse, and death by suicide or overdose. This study evaluates a system for resolving problems with patient flow and organization in health care systems, using electronic medical record systems and a high-level of input from healthcare leadership, frontline providers and patients.


    Active VA Grants

    Participatory System Dynamics vs Usual Quality Improvement: Is Staff Use of Simulation an Effective, Scalable and Affordable Way to Improve Timely Veteran Access to High-quality Mental Health Care? (I01HX002521)

    Participatory system dynamics (PSD) helps improve quality with existing resources, critical in mental health and all VA health care. PSD uses learning simulations to improve staff decisions, showing how goals for quality can best be achieved given local resources and constraints. We aim to significantly increase the proportion of patients who start and complete evidence-based care, and determine the costs of using PSD for improvement.


    National Responsibilities

    2019 National Institutes of Health, Center for Scientific Review
    Community Influences on Health Behavior (CIHB) Study Section

    2019-present VA Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) 
    QUERI/Health Services Research & Development, Scientific Merit Review Committee

    2019-present Emory University
    Prolonged Exposure Consultant Training Program Advisory Board

    2018-present National Institutes of Health
    Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH)
    Mental Health Faculty Mentor

    2015-2017 National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Program
    National Institute of Mental Health Clinical Research Review Committee



    Teaching Responsibilities

    Quality Improvement and Systems of Care Competencies
    Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Residency, Stanford University School of Medicine & VA Palo Alto Health Care System

    Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program Seminar
    VA Palo Alto research centers of the National Center for PTSD (NCPTSD), Center for Innovation to Implementation (Ci2i), Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Care (MIRECC), and War-related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC).



    Open Science Resources for the Modeling to Learn Simulation Learning Program are available on GitHub at https://mtl.how and https://mtl.how/demo

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