Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 59 Results

  • Jagannath Padmanabhan

    Jagannath Padmanabhan

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Bio Jagannath (Jagan) Padmanabhan, PhD is a postdoctoral research fellow in Dr. Geoffrey Gurtner?s laboratory in the Department of Surgery at Stanford University. He is a bioengineer by training (PhD, Yale University 2016) and his research interests lie at the interface of bioengineering, surgery and data science. In Dr. Gurtner's lab, Jagan is exploring the role of mechanical signaling in biomedical implant failure. He also contributes to the development of novel biomaterials for wound healing applications. He uses single cell sequencing, bioinformatics, bioengineering tools, small animal surgical models and clinical specimens to interrogate fibrotic events at the biomaterial-tissue interface and during wound healing.

    Jagan is also passionate about science education and public engagement with science. He teaches STEM courses for high school students in collaboration with the Stanford pre-collegiate Institutes every summer. He also runs a blog for scientists, seekers and skeptics at www.sciencers.org.

    Quick fact: Four languages and counting.

  • David T. Paik

    David T. Paik

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. David Paik is instructor working with Dr. Joseph Wu at Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. At Stanford, his focus is to utilize single-cell RNA-sequencing technology to elucidate patient-specific mechanisms of various cardiovascular diseases, characterize embryonic heart development, and optimize differentiation of iPSCs to subtypes of cardiovascular cells. Dr. Paik received his BA in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Boston University (2010) and PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology at Vanderbilt University (2015). At Vanderbilt, Dr. Paik investigated the endogenous cardiac repair mechanisms in the adult heart following ischemic injury such as myocardial infarction, with focus on the role of Wnt signaling pathway on coronary vessel formation and plasticity of endothelial cells during cardiac tissue repair. During his PhD training, Dr. Paik completed HHMI/VUMC Certificate Program in Molecular Medicine, where he was supervised by his clinical mentor Dr. Douglas Sawyer to interact with congestive heart failure patients and to bridge clinical sciences with basic and translational cardiovascular research. Dr. Paik is currently supported by the NIH NHLBI K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award.

  • Feng Pan

    Feng Pan

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I intend to contribute to a better understanding of the genetic basis of cancer, with a specific focus on the role of epigenetic regulators or epigenetic marks in the pathogenesis of AML. I will also undertake basic work in defining the landscape of mammalian epigenome in both normal and malignant states, and the molecular mechanisms by which integration of all these data establish a 3D regulatory network. I am especially interested in identifying and characterizing the biological mechanisms of cancer stem cells from an epigenetic perspective through which the mechanistic and biological relevance of many epigenetic regulators will be unraveled and connected.

  • Paul Pang

    Paul Pang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. Paul Pang is a postdoctoral fellow at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute with research interests in disease modeling, drug discovery, and precision medicine through the use of embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Dr. Pang received his PhD from Baylor College of Medicine (2019) where he studied the alternative splicing of SCN5A in the heart and the effects of its misregulation in myotonic dystrophy. During his PhD training, he was a recipient of the NIH T32 and F31 NRSA Predoctoral Fellowships, Claude W. Smith Fellowship Award, and Dean's Award of Excellence among numerous presentation and travel awards from the Muscular Dystrophy Association and the American Heart Association. During his postdoctoral training, Dr. Pang has been awarded and currently being funded by the NIH T32 and F32 NRSA Postdoctoral Fellowships.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Stanford Medicine Resources: