School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 63 Results

  • Fatih Inci

    Fatih Inci

    Basic Life Res Scientist, Rad/Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection

    Current Role at Stanford Dr. Fatih Inci?s area of excellence in research is to create micro- and nano-scale platform technologies at the intersection of medicine, biomedical engineering, biotechnology, chemistry, and materials science by manipulating biomolecules, cells and viruses in small volumes that offers precise solutions for real-world challenges in clinical diagnostics, personalized medicine, early cancer detection, forensic science, and biomarker discovery.

    SOME OF THE RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS and NEWS
    ?New device selects healthy sperm (Stanford Medicine) (2018).
    ?WPI Researchers Play Critical Role to Create Sperm-Sorting Device That Could Improve IVF Success (Worcester Polytechnic Institute) (2018).
    ?Sperm ?obstacle course? created by scientists to select healthiest ones for IVF (The Independent UK) (2018).
    ?Separating the weak from the strong: New device sorts sperm (Scope by Stanford Medicine) (2018).
    ?Interview on Istanbul University, Science Faculty - Faculty Guide (2017).
    ?Bioengineering and Biomedicine - Interview on Crossing Paths (2017).
    ?RöporTAF Interview on TAV Network (2017).
    ?Scientists develop new HIV diagnostic device (Johns Hopkins News-Letter) (2016).
    ?Potential point-of-care diagnostic platform (EurekAlert ? Science AAAS) (2015).
    ?A New Platform for Point-of-Care Diagnostics? (Optics&Photonics News) (2015).
    ?Universelle Diagnostik: Ein Bluttest für alles (Deutschlandfunk) (2015).
    ?Smarter, Cheaper Technologies Offer Improved Point-of-care Medicine (NIH ? National Institue of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering) (2015).
    ?New HIV Test May Improve Point-of-care Medicine in Remote Regions (Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)) (2015).
    ?New Biosensing Platform to be used in Disease Detection (Dartmouth University)
    ?Paper and Phones Could Soon Diagnose Ebola and HIV for $1 (Newsweek) (MSN News) (2015).
    ?Biosensing Films and Smartphones Let Doctors Diagnose Disease from Anywhere (Popular Science) (2015).
    ?Bientôt un diagnostic médical avec son smartphone (Futura Sciences) (2015).
    ?Novel Biosensing Platform Could Remotely Diagnose Disease And Monitor Treatment (BioSpace) (2015).
    ?Smarter, cheaper technologies for improved point-of-care medicine in remote areas (Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence) (2015).
    ?App may detect bacterial infections (TV news in WPLG TV, an affiliate of ABC News) (2015).
    ?Un sistema permite diagnosticar enfermedades por el cellular (Investigacion y Desarrollo) (2015).
    ?Smartphone accessory puts HIV diagnosis in doctors' pockets (Engadget) (2015).
    ?Cell Phone App Detects Bacteria and Infectious Diseases (HCP Live) (2015).
    ?New Biosensing Platform Could Quickly and Accurately Diagnose Disease and Monitor Treatment Remotely (Florida Atlantic University) (2015).
    ?Smart phone diagnosis? Biosensing platform quickly and accurately diagnoses disease and monitors treatment remotely (ScienceDaily) (2015).
    ?Smartphone App Detects Bacteria, Diseases (Highlights in Product, Design & Development) (Nature World News) (2015).
    ?Novel biosensing platform could remotely determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli (News-Medical Net) (2015)
    ?Nanomechanical motion of Escherichia coli adhered to a surface ? (Canary Center at Stanford Newsletter) (2014).
    ?And so they beat on, flagella against the cantilever ? (American Institute of Physics) (Phys.org) (EurekAlert ? Science AAAS) (ScienceDaily) (Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence) (2014).
    ?It?s flagella against the Cantilever for the fate of bacteria ? (Boston University) (Science 2.0) (2014).
    ?Palo Alto Weekly - Stoking a passion for science (News Cover) (2014).
    ?Disposable Chips to Detect Antiepileptic Drug Serum Concentrations at the Point of Care using Nanoplasmonic Platform ? Brigham & Women?s Hospital, BRIght Future Prize (Nature Medicine) (Brigham & Women?s Hospital) (2013).

  • Erik Ingelsson

    Erik Ingelsson

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the link between metabolic disturbances, such as obesity and insulin resistance, and the development of cardiovascular disease. Our research is translational and interdisciplinary, combining population-based studies with molecular biology to reach new insights into the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and related conditions, identification of new biomarkers for improved risk prediction, and discovery of novel drug targets.

  • Alexander Ioannidis

    Alexander Ioannidis

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biomedical Data Sciences

    Bio Alexander graduated from Harvard in Chemistry and Physics and earned an MPhil in Computational Biology from the University of Cambridge. Prior to Stanford, he worked in superconducting computing research at Northrop Grumman. He is a PhD graduate of Stanford's Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, where he teaches machine learning and data science. As a current postdoctoral scholar, his research focues on applying computational methods to problems in human population genetics.

  • John P.A. Ioannidis

    John P.A. Ioannidis

    C. F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention in the School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Meta-research
    Evidence-based medicine
    Clinical and molecular epidemiology
    Human genome epidemiology
    Research design
    Reporting of research
    Empirical evaluation of bias in research
    Randomized trials
    Statistical methods and modeling
    Meta-analysis and large-scale evidence
    Prognosis, predictive, personalized, precision medicine and health
    Sociology of science

  • Cristiana Iosef

    Cristiana Iosef

    Basic Life Science Research Scientist, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Cristiana Iosef returned to Stanford University Medical School in Feb 2019, after serving for five years, as a research associate professor of Pharmacology, in the Nevada State University. Enthusiastically, Cristiana joined Dr Michael Fischbein?s research program in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, and she will focus on the molecular cues leading to vascular aneurysms. The long-term goal is to design high precision personalized therapies based on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) aimed to restore the defective signaling pathways associated with cardio-vascular pathologies, or to predict their evolution. This collaboration started in 2010 while being a member of the Stanford/Pediatrics Department (Alvira lab) and yielded an important publication: Merk DR, Chin JT, Dake BA, Maegdefessel L, Miller MO, Kimura N, Tsao PS, Iosef C, Berry GJ, Mohr FW, Spin JM, Alvira CM, Robbins RC, Fischbein MP. miR-29b participates in early aneurysm development in Marfan syndrome. Circ Res. 2012 Jan 20;110(2):312-24. Dr Iosef is a dvm-surgeon and molecular signaling expert and she began her research career as a Fulbright Graduate Scholar in Washington University School of Medicine (St Louis, MO). She continued to specialize in animal models for human medicine practice in the Ohio State University. Prior to joining Stanford University in 2010, Cristiana developed an important body of work on signal-transduction and proteomic profiling of placental mesenchymal stem cells, in the University of Western Ontario, Canada (2001-10). In addition to her academic duties, Cristiana served as an associate director of the Mountain West Clinical Translational Research Consortium (2016-19). When she is not in the lab, Dr Iosef can be found hiking on the Pacific coast, skiing in the Sierras, visiting art galleries or she may study for her brown-belt exam in martial arts at JKA Shotokan Stanford. Aside from being a devoted vet-surgeon scientist, Cristiana is the proud mom of a young corporate lawyer.

  • Eric Ip

    Eric Ip

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Ip is Director of Clinical Therapeutics Curriculum for the Stanford University MSPA Program and Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health. He completed his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from UCSF School of Pharmacy and his post-graduate residency at Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center. He is a clinical pharmacist specializing in diabetes and cardiovascular care. He established and currently co-leads the Diabetes Management Program at Kaiser Permanente Mountain View Medical Offices. He is also Chair and Professor of Clinical Sciences at Touro University California College of Pharmacy. Dr. Ip's research interests include anabolic steroids and performancing enhancing drugs as well as educational research.

  • Susan Ipaktchian

    Susan Ipaktchian

    Director of print and web communications, School of Medicine - Communications & Public Affairs

    Current Role at Stanford I oversee the editors and writers who produce the news releases about the School of Medicine, as well as three publications produced by our office -- Stanford Medicine magazine, the Inside Stanford Medicine newspaper and the Stanford Medicine News community newsletter.

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