School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 62 Results

  • Andrei Iagaru

    Andrei Iagaru

    Professor of Radiology (Nuclear Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current research projects include:
    1) PET/MRI and PET/CT for Early Cancer Detection
    2) Targeted Radionuclide Therapy
    3) Clinical Translation of Novel PET Radiopharmaceuticals;

  • David Iberri

    David Iberri

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    Bio Dr. Iberri is a medical oncologist and hematologist who specializes in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. His clinical practices runs the gamut of malignant and non-malignant hematologic disorders including acute and chronic leukemias, multiple myeloma and lymphomas, and bleeding and thrombotic disorders. He is actively involved in clinical trials evaluating novel agents in hematologic malignancies. His research interests are in the development and application of biomarkers to select patients most likely to benefit from therapy.

  • Ibrahim Adejoh Idakoji

    Ibrahim Adejoh Idakoji

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology

    Bio Ibrahim Idakoji is a native of the Bay Area and practicing Interventional Radiologist at Stanford Medical Center who specializes in minimally invasive, image-guided percutaneous and endovascular procedures that aid in the diagnosis and treatment of complex vascular and oncologic disease. Some of his areas of interest include: treatment of both acute and chronic venous thromboembolic disease, treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic malignancy, and percutaneous pain management.

  • Juliana Idoyaga

    Juliana Idoyaga

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Idoyaga Lab is focused on the function and biology of dendritic cells, which are specialized antigen-presenting cells that initiate and modulate our body?s immune responses. Considering their importance in orchestrating the quality and quantity of immune responses, dendritic cells are an indisputable target for vaccines and therapies.

    Dendritic cells are not one cell type, but a network of cells comprised of many subsets or subpopulations with distinct developmental pathways and tissue localization. It is becoming apparent that each dendritic cell subset is different in its capacity to induce and modulate specific types of immune responses; however, there is still a lack of resolution and deep understanding of dendritic cell subset functional specialization. This gap in knowledge is an impediment for the rational design of immune interventions. Our research program focuses on advancing our understanding of mouse and human dendritic cell subsets, revealing their endowed capacity to induce distinct types of immune responses, and designing novel strategies to exploit them for vaccines and therapies.

  • Debra M. Ikeda, M.D.

    Debra M. Ikeda, M.D.

    Professor of Radiology (Breast Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests are quality improvement in mammography positioning, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) cancer detection and imaging pitfalls, MRI-guided breast biopsy, MRI BIRADS 3 lesions, fiducial markers for Radiation Therapy, correlation of breast cancer and FDG PET imaging, percutaneous breast biopsy

  • Gentaro Ikeda

    Gentaro Ikeda

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio My long-term goal is to become a physician scientist and develop innovative diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for patients with cardiovascular disease. Based on my experience as a cardiologist for the past 5 years, I have become aware of major clinical shortcomings, specifically in the current pharmaceutical therapies for myocardial infarction (MI) and chronic heart failure (HF). Some evidence-based drug therapies, including ?-blockers, ivabradine, and renin?angiotensin?aldosterone antagonists are difficult to apply to critical patients due to adverse side effects. Drugs that have shown efficacy in basic animal experiments have failed to show significant benefits in clinical trials. To address these problems, I moved to academia to conduct translational research. During my graduate training in the Egashira Lab, I focused on drug delivery systems (DDS) that target mitochondria in animal models of MI. I obtained advanced skills in molecular biology, mitochondrial bioenergetics, and animal surgery. I realized the importance of translational research and the great potential of DDS to overcome many clinical problems. I developed nanoparticle-mediated DDS containing cyclosporine for the treatment of patients with MI. I published a first author paper and received academic awards for my novel science. Since becoming a postdoctoral fellow in the Yang Lab, I have continued to build upon my previous training in translational research. I am currently developing an innovative therapy, namely, extracellular vesicles-mediated mitochondrial transfer for the failing heart.

  • Fumiaki Ikeno

    Fumiaki Ikeno

    Program Director (U.S) Japan Biodesign, Stanford Biodesign, Medicine - Med/Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Program Director (U.S) Japan Biodesign, Stanford Biodesign
    Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University


    Dr. Ikeno is a Research Associate, Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University. In this role, he is responsible for pre clinical studies including GLP for medical devices and also regenerative medicines for cardiovascular diseases. Currently, he is devoting himself to the international regulatory project between Japan and the United States, also known as "Harmonization by Doing", whose focus is to collaborate with regulatory agencies such as FDA, PMDA/MHLW, academia and industries for improving the regulatory process in the 2 largest medtech markets. Dr. Ikeno also devoted himself to found Japan biodesign program which is a collaborative program with University of Tokyo, Osaka University, Tohoku University, Japan Federation Medical Device Association, Ministry of Education Japan and Stanford biodesign program. Currently, Dr. Ikeno serves as the Program Director (US) for Japan Biodesign. Dr. Ikeno is co-founder and board member of US-Japan MedTech Frontier which is a non-profit cooperate to make a trans-pacific eco-system of medical device between Japan and USA.

    After 9 years clinical practice as an interventional cardiologist and Family Doctor in rural areas of Japan, Dr. Ikeno came to Stanford as a Researcher and completed his Biodesign Certificate Program. Being part of the ecosystem in Silicon Valley, Dr. Ikeno participated in more than 200 medtech projects and 50 GLP studies as well as in the analysis of clinical trials for cardiovascular medicine (BARI2D, FAME, ReOPEN etc). His other academic consortium projects include Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, Global Consensus Working Group of Optical Coherence Tomography, and Japan-US consensus document for the treatment of critical limb ischemia.

    Over the last decade, Dr. Ikeno has served as an advisor for medical device industries and currently serves as a chief medical officer of an incubation fund specific for medtech (Medventure Partners, Inc, Tokyo) as a spin-off from Innovation Network Corporation of Japan (INCJ) that is the largest government and private partnership fund in Japan. He is also serving as a chair of cardiovascular working group of APAN (Asian Pacific Advanced Network) that contributes the remote education, research activities, and tele-health using a specialized internet network. Dr.Ikeno is also serving as consulting faculty/lecturer roles in several universities in Japan including University of Tokyo, Osaka University, Tsukuba University etc. Dr. Ikeno has authored over 70 peer reviewed publications and textbooks and has been invited to lecture at international medical conferences. Dr. Ikeno is a council member of U.S.- Japan Council which is a non-profit organization by Japanese American. He is serving as a mentor for START-X MED which is an accelerating program for Stanford related entrepreneurs in medical fields.

    Contact Information


    Falk CVRC CV007
    300 Pasteur Drive
    Palo Alto, CA 94305-5406

  • Daniel Imler

    Daniel Imler

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in understanding the impact of smart, agile clinical pathways to drive behavior change among providers.

  • Fatih Inci

    Fatih Inci

    Basic Life Res Scientist, Rad/Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection

    Current Role at Stanford Dr. Fatih Inci?s area of excellence in research is to create micro- and nano-scale platform technologies at the intersection of medicine, biomedical engineering, biotechnology, chemistry, and materials science by manipulating biomolecules, cells and viruses in small volumes that offers precise solutions for real-world challenges in clinical diagnostics, personalized medicine, early cancer detection, forensic science, and biomarker discovery.

    SOME OF THE RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS and NEWS
    ?New device selects healthy sperm (Stanford Medicine) (2018).
    ?WPI Researchers Play Critical Role to Create Sperm-Sorting Device That Could Improve IVF Success (Worcester Polytechnic Institute) (2018).
    ?Sperm ?obstacle course? created by scientists to select healthiest ones for IVF (The Independent UK) (2018).
    ?Separating the weak from the strong: New device sorts sperm (Scope by Stanford Medicine) (2018).
    ?Interview on Istanbul University, Science Faculty - Faculty Guide (2017).
    ?Bioengineering and Biomedicine - Interview on Crossing Paths (2017).
    ?RöporTAF Interview on TAV Network (2017).
    ?Scientists develop new HIV diagnostic device (Johns Hopkins News-Letter) (2016).
    ?Potential point-of-care diagnostic platform (EurekAlert ? Science AAAS) (2015).
    ?A New Platform for Point-of-Care Diagnostics? (Optics&Photonics News) (2015).
    ?Universelle Diagnostik: Ein Bluttest für alles (Deutschlandfunk) (2015).
    ?Smarter, Cheaper Technologies Offer Improved Point-of-care Medicine (NIH ? National Institue of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering) (2015).
    ?New HIV Test May Improve Point-of-care Medicine in Remote Regions (Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)) (2015).
    ?New Biosensing Platform to be used in Disease Detection (Dartmouth University)
    ?Paper and Phones Could Soon Diagnose Ebola and HIV for $1 (Newsweek) (MSN News) (2015).
    ?Biosensing Films and Smartphones Let Doctors Diagnose Disease from Anywhere (Popular Science) (2015).
    ?Bientōt un diagnostic médical avec son smartphone (Futura Sciences) (2015).
    ?Novel Biosensing Platform Could Remotely Diagnose Disease And Monitor Treatment (BioSpace) (2015).
    ?Smarter, cheaper technologies for improved point-of-care medicine in remote areas (Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence) (2015).
    ?App may detect bacterial infections (TV news in WPLG TV, an affiliate of ABC News) (2015).
    ?Un sistema permite diagnosticar enfermedades por el cellular (Investigacion y Desarrollo) (2015).
    ?Smartphone accessory puts HIV diagnosis in doctors' pockets (Engadget) (2015).
    ?Cell Phone App Detects Bacteria and Infectious Diseases (HCP Live) (2015).
    ?New Biosensing Platform Could Quickly and Accurately Diagnose Disease and Monitor Treatment Remotely (Florida Atlantic University) (2015).
    ?Smart phone diagnosis? Biosensing platform quickly and accurately diagnoses disease and monitors treatment remotely (ScienceDaily) (2015).
    ?Smartphone App Detects Bacteria, Diseases (Highlights in Product, Design & Development) (Nature World News) (2015).
    ?Novel biosensing platform could remotely determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli (News-Medical Net) (2015)
    ?Nanomechanical motion of Escherichia coli adhered to a surface ? (Canary Center at Stanford Newsletter) (2014).
    ?And so they beat on, flagella against the cantilever ? (American Institute of Physics) (Phys.org) (EurekAlert ? Science AAAS) (ScienceDaily) (Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence) (2014).
    ?It?s flagella against the Cantilever for the fate of bacteria ? (Boston University) (Science 2.0) (2014).
    ?Palo Alto Weekly - Stoking a passion for science (News Cover) (2014).
    ?Disposable Chips to Detect Antiepileptic Drug Serum Concentrations at the Point of Care using Nanoplasmonic Platform ? Brigham & Women?s Hospital, BRIght Future Prize (Nature Medicine) (Brigham & Women?s Hospital) (2013).

  • Erik Ingelsson

    Erik Ingelsson

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the link between metabolic disturbances, such as obesity and insulin resistance, and the development of cardiovascular disease. Our research is translational and interdisciplinary, combining population-based studies with molecular biology to reach new insights into the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and related conditions, identification of new biomarkers for improved risk prediction, and discovery of novel drug targets.

  • Alexander Ioannidis

    Alexander Ioannidis

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biomedical Data Sciences

    Bio Alexander graduated from Harvard in Chemistry and Physics and earned an MPhil in Computational Biology from the University of Cambridge. Prior to Stanford, he worked in superconducting computing research at Northrop Grumman. He is a PhD graduate of Stanford's Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, where he teaches machine learning and data science. As a current postdoctoral scholar, his research focues on applying computational methods to problems in human population genetics.

  • John P.A. Ioannidis

    John P.A. Ioannidis

    C. F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention in the School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Meta-research
    Evidence-based medicine
    Clinical and molecular epidemiology
    Human genome epidemiology
    Research design
    Reporting of research
    Empirical evaluation of bias in research
    Randomized trials
    Statistical methods and modeling
    Meta-analysis and large-scale evidence
    Prognosis, predictive, personalized, precision medicine and health
    Sociology of science

  • Cristiana Iosef

    Cristiana Iosef

    Basic Life Science Research Scientist, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Cristiana Iosef returned to Stanford University Medical School in Feb 2019, after serving for five years, as a research associate professor of Pharmacology, in the Nevada State University. Enthusiastically, Cristiana joined Dr Michael Fischbein?s research program in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, and she will focus on the molecular cues leading to vascular aneurysms. The long-term goal is to design high precision personalized therapies based on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) aimed to restore the defective signaling pathways associated with cardio-vascular pathologies, or to predict their evolution. This collaboration started in 2010 while being a member of the Stanford/Pediatrics Department (Alvira lab) and yielded an important publication: Merk DR, Chin JT, Dake BA, Maegdefessel L, Miller MO, Kimura N, Tsao PS, Iosef C, Berry GJ, Mohr FW, Spin JM, Alvira CM, Robbins RC, Fischbein MP. miR-29b participates in early aneurysm development in Marfan syndrome. Circ Res. 2012 Jan 20;110(2):312-24. Dr Iosef is a dvm-surgeon and molecular signaling expert and she began her research career as a Fulbright Graduate Scholar in Washington University School of Medicine (St Louis, MO). She continued to specialize in animal models for human medicine practice in the Ohio State University. Prior to joining Stanford University in 2010, Cristiana developed an important body of work on signal-transduction and proteomic profiling of placental mesenchymal stem cells, in the University of Western Ontario, Canada (2001-10). In addition to her academic duties, Cristiana served as an associate director of the Mountain West Clinical Translational Research Consortium (2016-19). When she is not in the lab, Dr Iosef can be found hiking on the Pacific coast, skiing in the Sierras, visiting art galleries or she may study for her brown-belt exam in martial arts at JKA Shotokan Stanford. Aside from being a devoted vet-surgeon scientist, Cristiana is the proud mom of a young corporate lawyer.

  • Eric Ip

    Eric Ip

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Ip is Director of Clinical Therapeutics Curriculum for the Stanford University MSPA Program and Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health. He completed his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from UCSF School of Pharmacy and his post-graduate residency at Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center. He is a clinical pharmacist specializing in diabetes and cardiovascular care. He established and currently co-leads the Diabetes Management Program at Kaiser Permanente Mountain View Medical Offices. He is also Chair and Professor of Clinical Sciences at Touro University California College of Pharmacy. Dr. Ip's research interests include anabolic steroids and performancing enhancing drugs as well as educational research.

  • Cynthia Irvine

    Cynthia Irvine

    Associate Dean, Office of Medical Education, School of Medicine - Student Affairs

    Current Role at Stanford Associate Dean, Office of Medical Education (MD Program); Co-Director, Scholarly Concentration in Medical Education

  • Steven S Isono

    Steven S Isono

    Clinical Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Bio Steven S. Isono, M.D. is a Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon who specializes in Sports Medicine as well as surgery of the knee and the shoulder.
    He attended Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts concentrating in Biochemical Sciences and wrote a Thesis on Sickle Cell Anemia. He then attended medical school at Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois, continued research investigating Liver Hepatomas and received his M.D. degree in 1982. The next five years included studying Microsurgery in Japan at the Kyoto University Hospital and the Tokyo Metropolitan Hospital as well as completing both his Internship in General Surgery and Residency in Orthopedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center in 1987.

    Dr. Isono received his initial Board Certification in Orthopaedic Surgery in 1989 and has been re-certified in 1999, 2009 and 2018. Steve also received a Certificate of Added Qualification (CAQ) in Sports Medicine in the inaugural class of 2007 and was re-certified in 2017. He is a member of many professional societies including the Association of NBA Team Physicians, The Olympic Sports Medicine Society, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, The American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine, the Arthroscopy Association of North America, the California Orthopaedic Association, the Western Orthopaedic Association, and the American College of Sports Medicine,

    Steve is currently serving as a Team Physician for the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association, United States Olympic Committee (USA Men's Swimming, Triathlon, Judo, Taekwondo, and Track and Field, Rowing and Boxing), and for Laney College. He is also a Consultant for the Ironman World Triathlon Championships, the Dew Tour of Action Sports, and the Association of Volleyball Professionals. Steve has also served as a Team Physician for the World Games of the Special Olympics, the 2015 Pan American Games in Toronto, Canada, the XXXI Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 2016, the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aries, Argentina in 2018, and will be attending the 2019 Pan American Games in Lima, Peru.

  • Haruka Itakura

    Haruka Itakura

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio I am an Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) in the Stanford University School of Medicine. As a physician-scientist, my research mission is to drive medical advances at the intersection of cancer and data science research. Specifically, I aim to innovate state-of-the-art technologies to extract clinically useful knowledge from heterogeneous multi-scale biomedical data to improve diagnostics and therapeutics in cancer. I am a board-certified hematologist-oncologist and informaticist with specialized training in basic science, health services, and translational research. My clinical background in oncology and PhD training in Biomedical Informatics position me to develop and apply data science methodologies on heterogeneous, multi-scale cancer to extract actionable knowledge that can improve outcomes in cancer. My ongoing research to develop and apply cutting-edge knowledge and skills to pioneer new robust methodologies for analyzing cancer big data is being supported by an NIH K01 Career Development Award in Biomedical Big Data Science. My research focuses on developing and applying machine learning frameworks and radiogenomic approaches for the integrative analysis of heterogeneous, multi-scale data to accelerate discoveries in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Projects include prediction modeliI am an Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and practicing oncologist at the Stanford Cancer Center with background in biomedical informatics. ng of survival and treatment response, biomarker discovery, cancer subtype discovery, and identification of new therapeutic targets.

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