School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 35 Results

  • Sean Bendall

    Sean Bendall

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to understand the mechanisms regulating the development of human systems. Drawing on both pluripotent stem cell biology, hematopoiesis, and immunology, combined with novel high-content single-cell analysis (CyTOF ? Mass Cytometry) and imagining (MIBI-Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging) we are creating templates of ?normal? human cellular behavior to both discover novel regulatory events and cell populations as well as understand dysfunctional processes such as cancer.

  • Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMS

    Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMS

    Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor

    Bio Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor
    Stanford University School of Medicine

    Director, Stanford Women?s Cancer Center
    Senior Advisor, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Director, Stanford Health Communication Initiative
    Advancing Communication Excellence at Stanford
    Stanford Center for Health Education
    Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning
    Stanford University

    Director, Stanford Health Care Communication Program
    Stanford Health Care

  • Dominique Bergmann

    Dominique Bergmann

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genetic, genomic and cell biological approaches to study cell fate acquisition, focusing on cases where cell fate is correlated with asymmetric cell division.

  • Daniel Bernstein

    Daniel Bernstein

    Alfred Woodley Salter and Mabel Smith Salter Endowed Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Role of alterations in mitochondrial structure and function in normal physiology and disease.
    2. Differences between R and L ventricular responses to stress, including gene expression and miR regulation.
    3. Using iPSC-derived myocytes to understand hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congenital heart disease.
    4. Immune biomarkers of risk after pediatric VAD implantation.
    5. Biomarkers for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Director, ChEM-H, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio Professor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, and the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, among many others. Her efforts in undergraduate education have earned the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award and the Donald Sterling Noyce Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

    Today, the Bertozzi Group at Stanford studies the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disorders such as arthritis, and infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. The work has advanced understanding of cell surface oligosaccharides involved in cell recognition and inter-cellular communication.

    Dr. Bertozzi's lab also develops new methods to perform controlled chemical reactions within living systems. The group has developed new tools for studying glycans in living systems, and more recently nanotechnologies for probing biological systems. Such "bioorthogonal" chemistries enable manipulation of biomolecules in their living environment.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi founded Redwood Bioscience of Emeryville, California, and has served on the research advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Francis Blankenberg

    Francis Blankenberg

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies on apoptotic cell death in vivo using the H MRS phenomenon.

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor and Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prof. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Douglas W. Blayney

    Douglas W. Blayney

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Improving the quality of cancer care at Stanford, in our network of care, and nationally

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Inner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

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