School of Medicine


Showing 1-35 of 35 Results

  • Leah Backhus

    Leah Backhus

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Thoracic Surgery) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Bio Leah Backhus trained in general surgery at the University of Southern California and cardiothoracic surgery at the University of California Los Angeles. She practices at Stanford Hospital and is Chief of Thoracic Surgery at the VA Palo Alto. Her surgical practice consists of general thoracic surgery with special emphasis on thoracic oncology and minimally invasive surgical techniques. She is also involved in research with the Thoracic Surgical Health Services Research group, and has grant funding through the Veterans Affairs Administration. Her current research interests are in imaging surveillance following treatment for lung cancer and cancer survivorship. She is a member of the National Lung Cancer Roundtable of the American Cancer Society serving as Chair of the Task Group on Lung Cancer in Women. She also serves as a professional member of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Advisory Panel on Improving Healthcare Systems. As an educator, Dr. Backhus is the Associate Program Director for the Thoracic Track Residency and serves on the ACGME Residency Review Committee for Thoracic Surgery which is the accrediting body for all cardiothoracic surgery training programs in the US.

  • Annelise E. Barron

    Annelise E. Barron

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Biophysical mechanisms of host defense peptides (a.k.a. antimicrobial peptides) and their peptoid mimics; also, molecular and cellular biophysics of human innate immune responses.

  • Michael Bassik

    Michael Bassik

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory is focused on (1) the development of new technologies for high-throughput functional genomics using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and (2) application of these tools to study the cellular response to drugs and endocytic pathogens (such as bacteria, viruses, and protein toxins). Fascinating in themselves, these pathogens also help illuminate basic cell biology. A complementary interest is in the identification of new drug targets and combinations to combat cancer and neurodegeneration.

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Urology, of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Function of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Informatics and image processing techniques that provide infrastructure for diagnosis in musculoskeletal imaging. Decision support for improving accuracy of bone tumor diagnosis. Improved methods for MRI in the musculoskeletal system.

  • Hans Becker

    Hans Becker

    Professor of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Myocardial bridges (MB) with associated upfront atherosclerotic lesions are common findings on coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). Abnormal septal wall motion in exercise echocardiography (EE) may to be associated with MB. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is considered the gold standard for the detection of MB. We investigate whether CTA is comparable to IVUS for the assessment of MB and upstream plaques in symptomatic patients with suspicion for MB raised by EE.

  • Gill Bejerano

    Gill Bejerano

    Associate Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science, of Biomedical Data Science and of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Bejerano, co-discoverer of ultraconserved elements, studies the Human Genome. His research focuses on genome sequence and function in both humans and related primate, mammalian and vertebrate species. He is deeply interested in mapping both coding and non-coding genome sequence variation to phenotype differences, and in extracting specific genetic insights from high throughput sequencing measurements, in the contexts of development and developmental abnormalities.

  • Sean Bendall

    Sean Bendall

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to understand the mechanisms regulating the development of human systems. Drawing on both pluripotent stem cell biology, hematopoiesis, and immunology, combined with novel high-content single-cell analysis (CyTOF ? Mass Cytometry) and imagining (MIBI-Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging) we are creating templates of ?normal? human cellular behavior to both discover novel regulatory events and cell populations as well as understand dysfunctional processes such as cancer.

  • Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMS

    Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMS

    Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor

    Bio Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor
    Stanford University School of Medicine

    Director, Stanford Women?s Cancer Center
    Senior Advisor, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Director, Stanford Health Communication Initiative
    Advancing Communication Excellence at Stanford
    Stanford Center for Health Education
    Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning
    Stanford University

    Director, Stanford Health Care Communication Program
    Stanford Health Care

  • Dominique Bergmann

    Dominique Bergmann

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genetic, genomic and cell biological approaches to study cell fate acquisition, focusing on cases where cell fate is correlated with asymmetric cell division.

  • Daniel Bernstein

    Daniel Bernstein

    Alfred Woodley Salter and Mabel Smith Salter Endowed Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Role of alterations in mitochondrial structure and function in normal physiology and disease.
    2. Differences between R and L ventricular responses to stress, including gene expression and miR regulation.
    3. Using iPSC-derived myocytes to understand hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congenital heart disease.
    4. Immune biomarkers of risk after pediatric VAD implantation.
    5. Biomarkers for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Director, ChEM-H, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio Professor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, and the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, among many others. Her efforts in undergraduate education have earned the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award and the Donald Sterling Noyce Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

    Today, the Bertozzi Group at Stanford studies the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disorders such as arthritis, and infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. The work has advanced understanding of cell surface oligosaccharides involved in cell recognition and inter-cellular communication.

    Dr. Bertozzi's lab also develops new methods to perform controlled chemical reactions within living systems. The group has developed new tools for studying glycans in living systems, and more recently nanotechnologies for probing biological systems. Such "bioorthogonal" chemistries enable manipulation of biomolecules in their living environment.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi founded Redwood Bioscience of Emeryville, California, and has served on the research advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Francis Blankenberg

    Francis Blankenberg

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies on apoptotic cell death in vivo using the H MRS phenomenon.

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor and Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prof. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Douglas W. Blayney

    Douglas W. Blayney

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Improving the quality of cancer care at Stanford, in our network of care, and nationally

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Inner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

  • Daniel Bloch

    Daniel Bloch

    Professor (Research) of Health Research and Policy, Emeritus

    Bio I received my PhD. in Mathematical Statistics in 1967. I joined the research community at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Immunology & Rheumatology, in 1984 as head statistician directing the biostatistics consulting and analytic support of the Arthritis Rheumatism Aging Medical Information System (ARAMIS) and Multipurpose Arthritis Center (MAC) grant-related research programs. In 1993 I was appointed Associate Professor with a joint appointment in the Departments of Medicine and of Health Research & Policy, and am currently Professor of Biostatistics at Stanford University, emeritus since 2007. My contributions to the statistics literature span numerous fields, including methods of sample size estimation, efficiency and bias of estimators, research methods for kappa statistics, non-parametric classification methods and methods of assessing multi-parameter endpoints. I have over 200 peer-reviewed publications. I have been directly involved with the development of numerous criteria rules for classification of diseases and with establishing guidelines for clinical trial research and in proposing responder criteria for osteoarthritis drugs. Since 1987, I have been a consultant on an ad hoc basis to pharmaceutical and biotechnical firms, including both start-up and established companies. I have extensive experience with devices, drugs and biologics and have participated in all aspects of applying statistics to implement investigational plans; e.g.: for protocol development, design of trials, database design. I?ve been a member of the FDA Statistical Advisors Panel, the statistical member on numerous data safety monitoring boards, and frequently represent companies at meetings with the FDA

  • Paul D. Blumenthal, MD, MPH

    Paul D. Blumenthal, MD, MPH

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Gynecology-Family Planning) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Improving Access to Family Planning Services in Low Resource Settings:

    Through a collaboration with Population Services International, the Stanford Program for International Reproductive Education and Services (SPIRES) provides technical direction in a program designed to improve access to and uptake of family planning, particularly Long Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC) such as IUDs and implants, in 14 developing countries globally. The first year saw insertion of over 280,000 IUDs.

  • Matthew Bogyo

    Matthew Bogyo

    Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab uses chemical, biochemical, and cell biological methods to study protease function in human disease. Projects include:

    1) Design and synthesis of novel chemical probes for serine and cysteine hydrolases.

    2) Understanding the role of hydrolases in bacterial pathogenesis and the human parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

    3) Defining the specific functional roles of proteases during the process of tumorogenesis.

    4) In vivo imaging of protease activity

  • Donna M. Bouley

    Donna M. Bouley

    Professor of Comparative Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests: ocular pathology, host-pathogen interactions in infectious disease, infectious disease in frogs, phenotypic characterization of tg and ko mice, histopathology of minimally-invasive radiological ablation techniques (focused ultrasound, cryoablation).

  • Linda Boxer, MD, PhD

    Linda Boxer, MD, PhD

    Vice Dean of the School of Medicine and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Regulation of expression of oncogenes in normal and malignant hematologic cells.

  • Scott Boyd, MD PhD

    Scott Boyd, MD PhD

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to understand the lymphocyte genotype-phenotype relationships in healthy human immunity and in immunological diseases. We apply new technologies and data analysis approaches to this challenge, particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and single-cell monoclonal antibody generation, in parallel with other functional assays.

  • Onn Brandman

    Onn Brandman

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Brandman Lab studies how cells sense and respond to stress. We employ an integrated set of techniques including single cell analysis, mathematical modeling, genomics, structural studies, and in vitro assays.

  • James D. Brooks

    James D. Brooks

    Keith and Jan Hurlbut Professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genomic approaches to identify disease biomarkers. We are most interested in translating biomarkers into clinical practice in urological diseases with a particular focus in cancer.

  • Martin Brown

    Martin Brown

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We seek to understand the mechanisms responsible for the resistance of cancers to treatment and to develop strategies to overcome these resistances. We are using molecular and cellular techniques and mouse models to potentiate the activity of radiation on tumors by inhibiting the bone marrow rescue of the tumor vasculature following therapy.

  • Wes (Janice) Brown

    Wes (Janice) Brown

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Janice (Wes) Brown specializes in the treatment of infectious complications that occur in patients who are receiving cancer treatments or are undergoing transplantation of solid organs or hematopoietic cells. She has been a member of the Blood and Marrow Transplantation faculty for more than twenty years and co-founded the Immunocompromised Host Infectious Diseases consultation service. Dr. Brown?s special interest is to understand the nature of immunodeficiency resulting from an ever- evolving spectrum of targeted and immunomodulatory therapy. Her laboratory studies approaches to enhance and/or rebuild protective immunity. She is a leader in the design and execution of clinical trials of new treatments for infections that have significantly improved the outcomes of high-risk patients.

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Michele and Timothy Barakett Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.

  • Nam Quoc Bui

    Nam Quoc Bui

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Bio Dr. Bui is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Stanford Cancer Institute and a specialist in the Sarcoma and Developmental Therapeutics programs. Dr. Bui earned an undergraduate degree in Computer Science at Stanford University and went on to earn his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He completed Internal Medicine residency at Stanford Hospital and Hematology/Oncology fellowship at the University of California San Diego, where he performed extensive research in bioinformatics to analyze tumor sequencing data. His research background and interests are in the field of bioinformatics as applied to large data sets and the study of novel compounds in rare malignancies.

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My genetics research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. We focus on novel methods development for complex disease genetics and risk prediction in multi-ethnic settings. I am also interested in clinical data science and development of new diagnostics.I am also interested in disruptive innovation for healthcare including modeling long-term risk shifts and novel payment models.

  • Eugene Butcher

    Eugene Butcher

    Klaus Bensch Professor in Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our interests include:
    1) The physiology and function of lymphocyte homing in local and systemic immunity;
    2) Biochemical and genetic studies of molecules that direct leukocyte recruitment;
    3) Chemotactic mechanisms and receptors in vascular and immune biology;
    4) Vascular control of normal and pathologic inflammation and immunity;
    5) Systems biology of immune cell trafficking and programming in tumor immunity.

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