School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 44 Results

  • JulienáSage

    JulienáSage

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cancer Biology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Christy Sandborg

    Christy Sandborg

    Professor of Pediatrics (Rheumatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The major emphasis of my work in the past decade has been focused on the future of academic pediatrics and pediatric rheumatology through providing training, research opportunities and environments to nurture and challenge future pediatric rheumatologists and subspecialists. Most recently my scope has expanded to include exploring new models of care for children with complex and chronic disease focused on improving quality and affordability.

  • Lee Sanders

    Lee Sanders

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I conduct interdisciplinary research to understand child and parent health literacy as potentially modifiable determinants of child health disparities. I am principal investigator on an multi-site, randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a low-literacy, early-childhood intervention designed to prevent obesity in the first two years of life. The aim of my current scholarship is to apply the health-literacy model to attenuate disparities for children with chronic illness.

  • Iris Schrijver

    Iris Schrijver

    Professor of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Genetics) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Iris Schrijver is a diplomate of the ABMG, with specialty certification in Clinical Molecular Genetics. In addition, she is a diplomate of the ABP in Clinical Pathology. She is one of the directors of the diagnostic Molecular Pathology laboratory and Stanford Point-of-Care testing. Research interests include the characterization of the molecular basis of inherited disorders, genotype-phenotype correlations, and development of novel molecular diagnostic tools.

  • Liora Schultz

    Liora Schultz

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio I am currently postdoctoral research fellow pursuing immunotherapy research in the oncology department at Stanford University. My clinical training as a pediatric hematology oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center highlighted the desperate need for novel therapeutic options for a subtype of aggressive pediatric leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Despite our best standard of care for AML, long term survival rates range from 50-60% with an unacceptably high relapse rate of 40%. The urgent need for novel treatments inspired me to pursue a research project in adoptive immunotherapy, genetically modifying Tcells to express artificial T cell receptors, termed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), that target AML specific antigens. In parallel to my clinical training, I constructed an AML specific CAR and demonstrated its ability to redirect T cell function mediating eradication of AML cells. As the field of CAR therapy rapidly advances, novel methods to optimize this therapeutic modality are imperative. To this end, supported by research demonstrating superior antitumor function of na´ve derived effector T cells compared to central memory derived effector T cells, I am investigating whether preferential modification of na´ve T cells to express CARs will generate a T cell subpopulation with increased efficacy. Consolidating my clinical and research experiences within highly academic institutes allows me to synthesize my pursuit of scientific rigor and commitment to the field of oncology, with a mission to achieve productive research and translatable results.

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