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Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Bio

Bio


Anneke Claypool is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University.

RESEARCH AREA: Health Policy

RESEARCH ABSTRACT:
Anneke Claypool's research is focused on developing models to evaluate health policy impacts and costs. Her current research includes analyzing the cost-effectiveness of chikungunya virus prevention with a dynamic transmission model and using mathematical modeling to analyze racial disparities in breast cancer incidence in the US. She is particularly interested in infectious disease and improvement in policies for communities with limited access to healthcare.

Publications

All Publications


  • Quantifying Positive Health Externalities of Disease Control Interventions: Modeling Chikungunya and Dengue. Medical decision making : an international journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making Claypool, A. L., Brandeau, M. L., Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. D. 2019: 272989X19880554

    Abstract

    Purpose. Health interventions can generate positive externalities not captured in traditional, single-disease cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs), potentially biasing results. We illustrate this with the example of mosquito-borne diseases. When a particular mosquito species can transmit multiple diseases, a single-disease CEA comparing disease-specific interventions (e.g., vaccination) with interventions targeting the mosquito population (e.g., insecticide) would underestimate the insecticide's full benefits (i.e., preventing other diseases). Methods. We developed three dynamic transmission models: chikungunya, dengue, and combined chikungunya and dengue, each calibrated to disease-specific incidence and deaths in Colombia (June 2014 to December 2017). We compared the models' predictions of the incremental benefits and cost-effectiveness of an insecticide (10% efficacy), hypothetical chikungunya and dengue vaccines (40% coverage, 95% efficacy), and combinations of these interventions. Results. Model calibration yielded realistic parameters that produced close matches to disease-specific incidence and deaths. The chikungunya model predicted that vaccine would decrease the incidence of chikungunya and avert more total deaths than insecticide. The dengue model predicted that insecticide and the dengue vaccine would reduce dengue incidence and deaths, with no effect for the chikungunya vaccine. In the combined model, insecticide was more effective than either vaccine in reducing the incidence of and deaths from both diseases. In all models, the combined strategy was at least as effective as the most effective single strategy. In an illustrative CEA, the most frequently preferred strategy was vaccine in the chikungunya model, the status quo in the dengue model, and insecticide in the combined model. Limitations. There is uncertainty in the target calibration data. Conclusions. Failure to capture positive externalities can bias CEA results, especially when evaluating interventions that affect multiple diseases. Multidisease modeling is a reasonable alternative for addressing such biases.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0272989X19880554

    View details for PubMedID 31642362

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Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

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