Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology
  • Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Fellowship:University of Minnesota (2003) MN
  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (1999)
  • Medical Education:Government Medical CollegeJabalpur (1993) India
  • Board Certification: Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, American Board of Pediatrics (2002)
  • Fellowship:Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (2002) PA
  • Residency:State University of New York (1999) NY
  • Residency:Sawai Man Singh Medical College (1995) India

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


1. Developing novel bone marrow transplant regimens for patients with hemoglobinopathies
2. Cord blood transplantation

Clinical Trials


  • A Multicenter, Open-label Study of CMX001 Treatment of Serious Diseases or Conditions Caused by dsDNA Viruses Not Recruiting

    CMX001 is an orally administered lipid conjugate of the synthetic nucleotide analog cidofovir (CDV). The conjugate is believed to be absorbed in the small intestine then delivered to target organs throughout the body where it crosses cell membranes by facilitated and passive diffusion. Inside the cell, CMX001 is cleaved by intracellular phospholipases to release CDV which is converted to the active antiviral agent, CDV-diphosphate (CDV-PP), by intracellular anabolic kinases. Adults and adolescents, regardless of viral infection/disease, will have a maximum weekly dose of 200 mg i.e., 200 mg once weekly OR 100 mg twice weekly; not to exceed 4mg/kg total weekly dose. Pediatric subjects (< 12 years), regardless of viral infection/disease, will have a maximum weekly dose of 4 mg/kg i.e., 4 mg/kg once weekly OR 2 mg/kg twice weekly.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Julia Buckingham, (650) 736 - 1556.

    View full details

  • The Adv Halt Trial Not Recruiting

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of preemptive treatment with CMX001 versus placebo for the prevention of AdV disease in recipients of HSCT with asymptomatic AdV viremia.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Julia Buckingham, (650) 736 - 1556.

    View full details

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Stable Long-Term Donor Engraftment following Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease BIOLOGY OF BLOOD AND MARROW TRANSPLANTATION Krishnamurti, L., Kharbanda, S., Biernacki, M. A., Zhang, W., Baker, K. S., Wagner, J. E., Wu, C. J. 2008; 14 (11): 1270-1278

    Abstract

    Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have the potential to decrease toxicities related to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and thus make HCT a more acceptable therapeutic option for this group of patients. We report the results of 7 patients enrolled on a study to evaluate safety and efficacy of HCT using bone marrow from an HLA matched sibling donor following an RIC regimen for patients with high-risk SCD. The conditioning regimen consisted of busulfan, fludarabine, equine antithymocyte globulin, and total lymphoid irradiation with shielding of the liver, lungs, heart, and gonads on day 1. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. The regimen was well tolerated, and all patients had hematopoietic recovery. Six of 7 patients are stably engrafted off immunosuppression and without sickle cell-related symptoms at 2 to 8.5 years after HCT. Consistent with the complete resolution of SCD related symptoms observed in the 6 engrafted patients, erythropoiesis of complete or predominantly donor origin was detected by red blood cell-specific chimerism assays, despite their having persistent mixed chimerism in the mononuclear and lymphoid compartments. These findings demonstrate the curative potential of allogeneic HCT after an RIC regimen in patients with SCD.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bbmt.2008.08.016

    View details for Web of Science ID 000260533900010

    View details for PubMedID 18940682

  • Inflammatory cytokines and the development of pulmonary complications after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with inherited metabolic storage disorders BIOLOGY OF BLOOD AND MARROW TRANSPLANTATION Kbarbanda, S., Panoskaltsis-Mortari, A., Haddad, I. Y., Blazar, B. R., Orchard, P. J., Cornfield, D. N., Grewal, S. S., Peters, C., Regelmann, W. E., Milla, C. E., Baker, K. S. 2006; 12 (4): 430-437

    Abstract

    Patients with inherited metabolic storage disorders are at a higher risk of developing pulmonary complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This single-center prospective study of 48 consecutive inherited metabolic storage disorder patients was performed to identify risk factors for the development of pulmonary complications after HCT. Before HCT, subjects underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for cell count, culture, nitrite levels, and analysis of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The overall incidence of pulmonary complications was 52% (infectious, 23%; noninfectious, 29%) over a period of 4 years. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage was the most frequent noninfectious complication and occurred in 19% of patients, all of whom had a diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis (Hurler and Maroteaux-Lamy syndromes). Levels of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in BAL fluid samples obtained before HCT were higher in patients with mucopolysaccharidoses than in patients with leukodystrophies. In addition, levels of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were increased in the BAL fluid of patients who developed noninfectious pulmonary complications compared with those who did not develop pulmonary complications. It is interesting to note that most noninfectious pulmonary complications occurred in patients with mucopolysaccharidoses, especially diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, which occurred exclusively in patients with mucopolysaccharidoses. Higher levels of bronchial proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines may be predictive of the development of subsequent posttransplantation noninfectious complications in patients with mucopolysaccharidoses, especially those with Hurler syndrome. Larger studies will be required to further elucidate etiologic mechanisms and predictive factors.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bbmt.2005.12.026

    View details for Web of Science ID 000236494600006

    View details for PubMedID 16545727

  • BDCM- a novel B cell line with genetic and functional similarity to dendritic cells British Journal of Hematology Kharbanda S, Salter R, Dong X, Tuma-Warrino R, Steinman RA 2002; 119 (3): 819-825

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