School of Medicine


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  • Mira Zein

    Mira Zein

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Zein received her dual bachelor?s degrees in Anthropology and Physiological Science at UCLA and worked initially as a healthcare consultant, developing programs that improve healthcare access for vulnerable populations. She returned to school to pursue a Masters in Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, where she further developed her interests in the intersection of medicine and broader social-cultural themes, particularly the impact on mental health. She worked with the International Rescue Committee in Baltimore to help address the acculturation and psychological stress the Baltimore refugee population faced in resettlement.

    In 2010, Dr. Zein began her medical training at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. During medical school she continue to pursue interests in global and cultural health. She represented McGill nationally as the Global Health Advocate in the Canadian Federation of Medical Students, and focused on national and local clinical projects to support refugee and asylum seeker access to medical and mental health treatment. She was awarded the Mona Bronfman Sheckman Prize in Psychiatry for her work. During her psychiatry residency training at New York University (NYU), Dr. Zein continued pursuing her interest in global mental health, working as a group leader for refugees/asylum seekers in the Bellevue Survivors of Torture program, and the Association for Culture and Psychiatry. She also became interested in Integrated Behavioral Health, particularly the University of Washington AIMs model, or Collaborative Care Model. She founded the Integrated Behavioral Health resident working group and designed a two-year resident training program in the Collaborative Care Model as well as pioneered other electives in HIV psychiatry and psych-oncology. She completed training in the AIMs model and also was part of an intensive collaborative pilot with the AIMs center to a complete a QI project in the Bellevue Hospital primary care site. As part of the two-year resident training program she developed a Collaborative Care model in one of NYU Langone-Brooklyns FQHC sites. In her last two years of residency she was an APA Leadership Fellow, and served on the APA Consult Liaison Psychiatry Committee. She worked on a Decisional Capacity Guidelines paper with other committee members, and presented on Consult Liaison educational opportunities and Integrated Behavioral Health Models at the APA conference. She completed residency as a chief resident and won awards for Excellence in Resident Teaching as well as for humanism and clinical excellence in the Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    Dr. Zein completed her Consult Liaison Fellowship at Stanford and has remained as clinical faculty. She is currently serving as an attending on the General, Intensive Care, and ED-psychiatry consult services as well as developing an Integrated Behavioral Health model for the Stanford Primary Care Clinic serving Cisco employees and their families.

  • Michael Zeineh

    Michael Zeineh

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Michael Zeineh received a B.S. in Biology at Caltech in 1995 and obtained his M.D.-Ph.D. from UCLA in 2003. After internship also at UCLA, he went on to radiology residency and neuroradiology fellowship both at Stanford. He has been an assistant professor of radiology since 2010. Combining clinical acumen in neuroradiology with advanced MRI acquisition and image processing as well as histologic validation, Dr. Zeineh hopes to advance the care of patients with neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, he is interested in Alzheimer's disease, sports-related mild traumatic brain injury, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Additionally, he is specifically interested and has over 20 years of experience studying hippocampal anatomy and pathology.

  • Jamie Zeitzer

    Jamie Zeitzer

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Zeitzer is a circadian physiologist specializing in the understanding of the impact of light on circadian rhythms and other aspects of non-image forming light perception.
    He examines the manner in which humans respond to light and ways to manipulate this responsiveness, with direct application to jet lag, shift work, and altered sleep timing in teens. Dr. Zeitzer has also pioneered the use of actigraphy in the determination of epiphenomenal markers of psychiatric disorders.

  • Bing Melody Zhang

    Bing Melody Zhang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research interests lie in the following areas:

    1) Using genetic/genomic approaches to study the genotype-phenotype correlation of inherited non-malignant hematologic disorders, especially platelet disorders.
    2) Development and application of molecular assays for clinical testing to support hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and solid organ transplantation.
    3) NGS-based TCR/Ig clonality/MRD diagnostic testing.
    4) HLA-related disease association and pharmacogenetic testing.

  • Niushen Zhang

    Niushen Zhang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Niushen Zhang specializes in the treatment of headache and facial pain. Dr. Zhang has a special interest in complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of headaches and facial pain. She is the Director of the Headache Fellowship Program at Stanford.

  • Heng Zhao

    Heng Zhao

    Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab is focused on developing novel therapeutic methods against stroke using rodent models. We study protective effect of postconditioning, preconditioning and mild hypothermia. The rationale for studying three means of neuroprotection is that we may discover mechanisms that these treatments have in common. Conversely, if they have differing mechanisms, we will be able to offer more than one treatment for stroke and increase a patient’s chance for recovery.

  • Maisa Ziadni

    Maisa Ziadni

    Instructor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Novel and integrative interventions for pain management

  • Andrew Zolopa

    Andrew Zolopa

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Zolopa’s research applies a variety of clinical epidemiologic methods in an effort to optimize antiretroviral therapy and understand the impact of drug resistance on response to ARV. Areas of focus include the clinical application of resistance testing in optimizing antiretroviral therapy, clinical cohorts, trials of antiretroviral therapies and population-based epidemiologic evaluation of HIV resistance and efficacy of ARV therapy. More recently studies focused on premature aging in HIV.

  • J. Bradley Zuchero

    J. Bradley Zuchero

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Glia are a frontier of neuroscience, and overwhelming evidence from the last decade shows that they are essential regulators of all aspects of the nervous system. The Zuchero Lab aims to uncover how glial cells regulate neural development and how their dysfunction contributes to diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and in injuries like stroke.

    Although glia represent more than half of the cells in the human brain, fundamental questions remain to be answered. How do glia develop their highly specialized morphologies and interact with neurons to powerfully control form and function of the nervous system? How is this disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases and after injury? By bringing cutting-edge cell biology techniques to the study of glia, we aim to uncover how glia help sculpt and regulate the nervous system and test their potential as novel, untapped therapeutic targets for disease and injury.

    We are particularly interested in myelin, the insulating sheath around neuronal axons that is lost in diseases like MS. How do oligodendrocytes- the glial cell that produces myelin in the central nervous system- form and remodel myelin, and why do they fail to regenerate myelin in disease? Our current projects aim to use cell biology and neuroscience approaches to answer these fundamental questions. Ultimately we hope our work will lead to much-needed therapies to promote remyelination in patients.

  • Evan Zucker

    Evan Zucker

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    Bio Dr. Zucker is a board-certified pediatric and cardiovascular radiologist with a special interest in CT and MRI for congenital heart disease.

  • Donna Zulman

    Donna Zulman

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Improving care and supporting self-management for patients with multiple chronic conditions
    - Designing and evaluating innovative health care delivery models for complex and costly patients
    - Optimizing health-related technology to personalize and improve care for complex patients and their caregivers

  • Corinna Zygourakis

    Corinna Zygourakis

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My goal is to translate research into real-world action and decision-making so that my work can impact patients and the institutions in which they receive care. With a research focus on healthcare cost and quality of care, I approach neurosurgery in a unique way?one that applies business operations, economics, and healthcare delivery principles to our field. I have pursued formal LEAN business training, and believe in the importance of working together with other departments and administrators, as well as physicians and surgeons on the hospital and national level, to effect change. During my residency, I developed and led a multi-departmental prospective study at UCSF called OR SCORE (OR Surgical Cost Reduction Project) that brought together surgeons from the neurosurgery, orthopedics and ENT departments with nurses and administrators. OR SCORE successfully reduced surgical supply costs by nearly one million dollars in its first year by providing >60 surgeons with price transparency scorecards. This work led to a first-author publication in JAMA Surgery, but more importantly, set the foundation for further quality improvement and cost reduction efforts across the UCSF hospital system.

    A volunteer neurosurgical mission trip to Guadalajara, Mexico, where limited resources create an OR environment that is strikingly more frugal than the U.S., inspired me to lead another project aimed at quantifying and reducing operating room waste at UCSF. I have also conducted research looking at the safety and outcomes of overlapping surgery, as well as several projects to define the factors underlying variation in cost for neurosurgical care using UCSF?s hospital data and national databases like the National Inpatient Sample, Vizient (formerly known as University Health Consortium), and Medicare.

    As a clinical fellow at Johns Hopkins, I continued and expanded these research efforts. I designed and implemented an Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) protocol at the Johns Hopkins Bayview hospital. This protocol standardized care for our spine patients, emphasizing pre-operative rehabilitation, psychiatric and nutritional assessments, and smoking cessation, as well as intra- and post-operative multi-modal pain therapy, early mobilization, and standardized antibiotic and bowel regimens. I also collaborated with engineers in the Johns Hopkins Carnegie Center for Surgical Innovation to develop better algorithms for intra-operative CT imaging, and provided assistance with operations to a basic science study looking at the role of cerebrospinal fluid drainage and duraplasty in a porcine model of spinal cord injury.

    At Stanford, I am building a research group focused on: (1) perfecting paradigms for delivery of high-end technology in spinal care, including robotics and navigation, (2) implementing cost and quality strategies in large healthcare systems, and (3) computational analysis of big-data to effect real-time risk stratification and decision making in spine surgery. I'm excited to collaborate with my peers across surgical and medical departments, as well as business and engineering colleagues.

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