School of Medicine


Showing 1-37 of 37 Results

  • Julia Kaltschmidt

    Julia Kaltschmidt

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The lab?s primary research interest is to understand how specific neuronal circuits are established. We use mouse genetics, combinatorial immunochemical labeling and high-resolution laser scanning microscopy to identify, manipulate, and quantitatively analyze synaptic contacts within the complex neuronal milieu of the spinal cord and the enteric nervous system.

  • Matthew Kanan

    Matthew Kanan

    Associate Professor of Chemistry and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Bio Associate Professor of Chemistry Matthew Kanan develops new catalysts and chemical reactions for applications in renewable energy conversion and CO2 utilization. His group at Stanford University has recently developed a novel method to create plastic from carbon dioxide and inedible plant material rather than petroleum products, and pioneered the study of ?defect-rich? heterogeneous electro-catalysts for converting carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to liquid fuel.

    Matthew Kanan completed undergraduate study in chemistry at Rice University (B.A. 2000 Summa Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa). During doctoral research in organic chemistry at Harvard University (Ph.D. 2005), he developed a novel method for using DNA to discover new chemical reactions. He then moved into inorganic chemistry for his postdoctoral studies as a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he discovered a water oxidation catalyst that operates in neutral water. He joined the Stanford Chemistry Department faculty in 2009 to continue research into energy-related catalysis and reactions. His research and teaching have already been recognized in selection as one of Chemistry & Engineering News? first annual Talented 12, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, Eli Lilly New Faculty Award, and recognition as a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Environmental Mentor, among other honors.

    The Kanan Lab addresses fundamental challenges in catalysis and synthesis with an emphasis on enabling new technologies for scalable CO2 utilization. The interdisciplinary effort spans organic synthesis, materials chemistry and electrochemistry.

    One of the greatest challenges of the 21st century is to transition to an energy economy with ultra-low greenhouse gas emissions without compromising quality of life for a growing population. The Kanan Lab aims to help enable this transition by developing catalysts and chemical reactions that recycle CO2 into fuels and commodity chemicals using renewable energy sources. To be implemented on a substantial scale, these methods must ultimately be competitive with fossil fuels and petrochemicals. With this requirement in mind, the group focuses on the fundamental chemical challenge of making carbon?carbon (C?C) bonds because multi-carbon compounds have higher energy density, greater value, and more diverse applications that one-carbon compounds. Both electrochemical and chemical methods are being pursued. For electrochemical conversion, the group studies how defects known as grain boundaries can be exploited to improve CO2/CO electro-reduction catalysis. Recent work has unveiled quantitative correlations between grain boundaries and catalytic activity, establishing a new design principle for electrocatalysis, and developed grain boundary-rich copper catalysts with unparalleled activity for converting carbon monoxide to liquid fuel. For chemical CO2 conversion, the group is developing C?H carboxylation and CO2 hydrogenation reactions that are promoted by simple carbonate salts. These reactions provide a way to make C?C bonds between un-activated substrates and CO2 without resorting to energy-intensive and hazardous reagents. Among numerous applications, carbonate-promoted carboxylation enables the synthesis of a monomer used to make polyester plastic from CO2 and a feedstock derived from agricultural waste.

    In addition to CO2 chemistry, the Kanan group is pursuing new strategies to control selectivity in molecular catalysis for fine chemical synthesis. Of particular interest in the use of electrostatic interactions to discriminate between competing reaction pathways based on their charge distributions. This effort uses ion pairing or interfaces to control the local electrostatic environment in which a reaction takes place. The group has recently shown that local electric fields can control regioselectivity in isomerization reactions catalyzed by gold complexes.

  • Cynthia Kapphahn

    Cynthia Kapphahn

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Adolescent Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Access to health care services for adolescents.
    Confidentiality.
    Mental Health Financing.
    Eating disorders.

  • Ioannis Karakikes

    Ioannis Karakikes

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Karakikes Lab aims to uncover fundamental new insights into the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of pathogenic mutations associated with familial cardiovascular diseases.

  • Makoto Kawai

    Makoto Kawai

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine

    Bio I am a physician scientist in the field of sleep medicine in aging and brain function. Using combined polysomnogram and novel neuroimaging technology, I aim to identify potential sleep biomarkers to investigate the mechanism of progression from normal aging to Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) or dementia. I also investigate the impact of sleep on cognitive/affective function or behavior abnormality in various neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor in Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.

  • John Kerner

    John Kerner

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in pediatric nutritional support and have experience evaluating new enteral and parenteral products especially for the neonate (I studied a "new" I.V. fat product for Abbott; I participated in a multicenter trial of a formula with fish oil in it for neonates with Mead Johnson and a multicenter trial of a new human milk fortifier for Wyeth).

  • Kajal Khanna

    Kajal Khanna

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Global pediatric emergency medicine research, educational scholarship, pediatric emergency medical care in low- and middle- income countries and rights-based approaches to health systems development

  • Nasim Sabery Khavari

    Nasim Sabery Khavari

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Gastroenterology, Celiac Disease, Nutrition in Celiac Disease

  • Paul A. Khavari, MD, PhD

    Paul A. Khavari, MD, PhD

    Carl J. Herzog Professor in Dermatology in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We work in epithelial tissue as a model system to study stem cell biology, cancer and new molecular therapeutics. Epithelia cover external and internal body surfaces and undergo constant self-renewal while responding to diverse environmental stimuli. Epithelial homeostasis precisely balances stem cell-sustained proliferation and differentiation-associated cell death, a balance which is lost in many human diseases, including cancer, 90% of which arise in epithelial tissues.

  • Chaitan Khosla

    Chaitan Khosla

    Director, ChEM-H, Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.

    For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

    For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

  • Peter S. Kim

    Peter S. Kim

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are studying the mechanism of viral membrane fusion and its inhibition by drugs and antibodies. We use the HIV envelope protein (gp120/gp41) as a model system. Some of our studies are aimed at creating an HIV vaccine. We are also characterizing protein surfaces that are referred to as "non-druggable". These surfaces are defined empirically based on failure to identify small, drug-like molecules that bind to them with high affinity and specificity.

  • Seung K. Kim  M.D., Ph.D.

    Seung K. Kim M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the development of pancreatic islet cells using molecular, embryologic and genetic methods in several model systems, including mice, pigs, human pancreas, embryonic stem cells, and Drosophila. Our work suggests that critical factors required for islet development are also needed to maintain essential functions of the mature islet. These approaches have informed efforts to generate replacement islets from renewable sources for diabetes.

  • Joshua W. Knowles

    Joshua W. Knowles

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic basis of coronary disease
    Genetic basis of insulin resistance
    Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH)

  • Juliet Klasing Knowles

    Juliet Klasing Knowles

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am currently working in the laboratories of Drs. Michelle Monje and John Huguenard at Stanford using genetic and optogenetic models of epilepsy to study the impact of recurrent seizures on myelin. This is a potential novel mechanism contributing to epileptogenesis, cognitive dysfunction and developmental delay in children with epilepsy. Concurrently, I am conducting translational research related to white matter/myelin abnormalities in neonatal and other forms of pediatric epilepsy in collaboration with Drs. Courtney Wusthoff and Kristen Yeom of Pediatric Epilepsy and Pediatric Neuroradiology.
    This work is supported by NIH/NINDS, the American Epilepsy Society, the CURE Foundation and the Stanford Child Health Research Institute.

  • Justin M Ko, MD, MBA

    Justin M Ko, MD, MBA

    Clinical Associate Professor, Dermatology

    Bio Dr. Ko joined Stanford Medicine in 2012 and serves as Director and Chief of Medical Dermatology for Stanford Health Care (SHC) while also spearheading the dermatology department's efforts around network development, digital health, quality/safety/performance improvement, and value-based care. He is active in a number of leadership roles within the organization including co-chairing the Clinic Advisory Council, a forum of medical and executive leaders of Stanford Health Care?s Ambulatory clinics, and as a Service Medical Director.

    His passion for melanoma, early cancer detection, and improving care delivery drives his efforts and research around leveraging advances in machine learning and artifical intelligence to increase the breadth of populations that can be reached. He developed and runs a digital care delivery program at SHC, providing virtual visits for patients and remote consultations for referring clinicians. He conducts research on and engages in collaborations around interventions that layer advances in machine learning on digital health capabilities to enhance access, quality and value of dermatologic care. He chairs the American Academy of Dermatology's Task Force Committee on Augmented Intelligence.

    Dr. Ko has also been driven to find new treatments for alopecia areata, an immune-mediated condition that can progress to total hair loss through various clinical trials and translational research efforts. He sits on the clinical research advisory board of the National Alopecia Areata Foundation and is founder and co-director of the Skin Interventional and Innovation Research Group (SIIRG) which conducts clinical and translational research on skin disease.

    He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University and worked in investment banking; mergers and acquisitions at JP Morgan before going on to earn a combined medical and business degree at Tufts University. During medical school, he was a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha honor society. Dr. Ko then performed his residency at the Harvard Dermatology Residency Training Program where he served as chief resident.

  • Brian Kobilka

    Brian Kobilka

    Helene Irwin Fagan Chair in Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Structure, function and physiology of adrenergic receptors.

  • Eric Kool

    Eric Kool

    The George A. and Hilda M. Daubert Professor in Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests ? Development of cell-permeable reagents for study and modification of RNAs
    ? Developing small-molecule probes of DNA repair pathways
    ? Design of a functional new genetic set, xDNA and xRNA (structure, function, applications)
    ? Synthesis of combinatorial fluorescent assemblies built on a DNA scaffold (oligodeoxyfluorosides, ODFs) as labels and sensors for biology and medicine

  • Sheri Krams

    Sheri Krams

    Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests: 1) NK Cell Responses to EBV, 2) Exosomes in Immune Responses, 3) Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell-Mediated Graft Prolongation, 4)Transplant Immunology

  • Elliot J. Krane

    Elliot J. Krane

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric Anesthesia) at the Stanford University Medical Center and of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The management of pain in children using intraspinal opioids, regional anesthetics, and novel analgesic agents; cerebral and osmolar complications of diabetic ketoacidosis in children.

  • Mark Krasnow

    Mark Krasnow

    Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Lung development and stem cells
    - Neural circuits of breathing and speaking
    - Lung diseases including lung cancer
    - New genetic model organism for biology, behavior, health and conservation

  • Emily Kraus

    Emily Kraus

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Emily Kraus is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford Children?s Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center. She specializes in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) sports medicine and takes a unique approach to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of sports injuries in athletes of all ages. She is involved in multiple Stanford IRB-approved research projects, including The Healthy Runner Project, a multicenter prospective interventional study focused on bone stress injury prevention in collegiate middle and long distance runners.

    Dr. Kraus also spends time performing gait analysis at the Stanford Run Safe Injury Prevention Program and serves as a medical advisors for the Adaptive Sports Injury Prevention Program at the Palo Alto VA. She has research and clinical interests in endurance sports medicine, injury prevention, running biomechanics, the prevention of bone stress injuries in collegiate athletes and the promotion of health and wellness at any age of life.

    She has completed seven marathons including Boston Marathon twice and one 50k ultramarathon. With running and staying physically active as one of her personal passions, she recognizes the importance of fitness for overall wellbeing and the prevention of chronic medical conditions.

  • Thomas M. Krummel, MD, FACS/FAAP

    Thomas M. Krummel, MD, FACS/FAAP

    Emile Holman Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Surgical Innovation, Simulation and Virtual Reality in Surgical Education, Fetal Healing-Cellular and Biochemical Mechanisms

  • Anshul Kundaje

    Anshul Kundaje

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop statistical and machine learning frameworks to learn predictive, dynamic and causal models of gene regulation from heterogeneous functional genomics data.

  • Calvin Kuo

    Calvin Kuo

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study cancer biology, intestinal stem cells (ISC), and angiogenesis. We use primary organoid cultures of diverse tissues and tumor biopsies for immunotherapy modeling, oncogene functional screening and stem cell biology. Angiogenesis projects include blood-brain barrier regulation, stroke therapeutics and anti-angiogenic cancer therapy. ISC projects apply organoid culture and ko mice to injury-inducible vs homeostatic stem cells and symmetric division mechanisms.

  • Clete A. Kushida, MD, PhD

    Clete A. Kushida, MD, PhD

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kushida is a neurologist and sleep specialist who directs several NIH- and industry-sponsored research studies, focused on topics such as the physical features and neurocognitive changes associated with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, the epidemiology and treatment of restless legs syndrome/periodic limb movement disorder, primary care sleep education and training, and countermeasures for sleep loss.

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