School of Medicine


Showing 1-4 of 4 Results

  • Andrei Iagaru

    Andrei Iagaru

    Professor of Radiology (Nuclear Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current research projects include:
    1) PET/MRI and PET/CT for Early Cancer Detection
    2) Targeted Radionuclide Therapy
    3) Clinical Translation of Novel PET Radiopharmaceuticals;

  • Juliana Idoyaga

    Juliana Idoyaga

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Idoyaga Lab is focused on the function and biology of dendritic cells, which are specialized antigen-presenting cells that initiate and modulate our body?s immune responses. Considering their importance in orchestrating the quality and quantity of immune responses, dendritic cells are an indisputable target for vaccines and therapies.

    Dendritic cells are not one cell type, but a network of cells comprised of many subsets or subpopulations with distinct developmental pathways and tissue localization. It is becoming apparent that each dendritic cell subset is different in its capacity to induce and modulate specific types of immune responses; however, there is still a lack of resolution and deep understanding of dendritic cell subset functional specialization. This gap in knowledge is an impediment for the rational design of immune interventions. Our research program focuses on advancing our understanding of mouse and human dendritic cell subsets, revealing their endowed capacity to induce distinct types of immune responses, and designing novel strategies to exploit them for vaccines and therapies.

  • Debra M. Ikeda, M.D.

    Debra M. Ikeda, M.D.

    Professor of Radiology (Breast Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests are mammography positioning, tomosynthesis (DBT) cancer detection and diagnosis, MRI, DWI, MRI-guided breast biopsy, breast cancer recurrence, tattoo/ fiducial/wire localization of axillary lymph nodes, breast cancer and FDG PET-CT imaging, artifical intelligence/deep learning, breast density, density notification legislation, COVID-19 effects on Breast Imaging Centers and personnel

  • John P.A. Ioannidis

    John P.A. Ioannidis

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research), of Epidemiology and Population Health and by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Meta-research
    Evidence-based medicine
    Clinical and molecular epidemiology
    Human genome epidemiology
    Research design
    Reporting of research
    Empirical evaluation of bias in research
    Randomized trials
    Statistical methods and modeling
    Meta-analysis and large-scale evidence
    Prognosis, predictive, personalized, precision medicine and health
    Sociology of science

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