School of Medicine


Showing 1-32 of 32 Results

  • Mark A. Cappelli

    Mark A. Cappelli

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    Bio Professor Cappelli received his B.Sc. degree in Physics (McGill, 1980), and M.A.Sc and Ph.D. degrees in Aerospace Sciences (Toronto, 1983, 1987). He joined Stanford University in 1987 and is currently a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Co-Director of the Engineering Physics Program. He carries out research in applied plasma physics with applications to a broad range of fields, including space propulsion, aerodynamics, medicine, materials synthesis, and fusion.

  • Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are committed to promoting an understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, and ensuring that all patients who are suffering from cerebrospinal fluid leaks receive appropriate diagnosis and treatment of this devastating, chronic, and fixable condition. We believe this can be best accomplished in a multidisciplinary setting involving expertise in radiology, neurology, and interventional pain medicine.

  • Chris Cartwright, MD

    Chris Cartwright, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of intestinal cell growth control; function and regulation of the Src family of tyrosine kinases in normal cells, and their deregulation in cancer cells.

  • Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have two main research interests:
    1) to better understand and treat patients with aggressive basal cell carcinomas
    2) to better understand the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of healthy human skin aging and to translate these insights into better care of skin diseases enriched in older patients particularly skin cancer and rosacea

  • Daniel Chang

    Daniel Chang

    Sue and Bob McCollum Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I specialize in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. I am interested in developing stereotactic body radiotherapy for tumors of the liver, both primary and metastatic. I am interested in developing functional imaging as a means of determining treatment response with radiation. I am also interested in developing image-guided radiotherapy to improve radiation delivery for GI cancers to reduce toxicity and improve disease outcome.

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Genomics and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Jauch Professor and Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, of Developmental Biology and of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory combines chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Alan G. Cheng

    Alan G. Cheng

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Active Wnt signaling maintains somatic stem cells in many organ systems. Using Wnt target genes as markers, we have characterized distinct cell populations with stem cell behavior in the inner ear, an organ thought to be terminally differentiated. Ongoing work focuses on delineating the developing significance of these putative stem/progenitor cells and their behavior after damage.

  • Zhen Cheng

    Zhen Cheng

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests To develop novel molecular imaging probes and techniques for non-invasively early detection of cancer using multimodality imaging technologies including PET, SPECT, MRI, optical imaging, etc.

  • Thomas L. Cherpes, DVM, MD

    Thomas L. Cherpes, DVM, MD

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Directs an infectious disease laboratory that performs basic, translational, and clinical research. Laboratory has particular focus on:
    1) relationship between exogenous sex steroids on susceptibility to microbial pathogens
    2) role of Type 2 immunity in Chlamydia infection
    3) developing cellular immunotherapies to combat infectious disease and cancer

  • Athena Cherry

    Athena Cherry

    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The use of molecular and molecular cytogenetic methods to identify chromosomal abnormalities in acquired and congenital disorders.

  • Ramsey Cheung

    Ramsey Cheung

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Cheung's research interests focus on liver diseases, with emphasis on viral hepatitis. His past research include investigating the mechanism of viral neutralization of hepatitis B virus at the molecular level and immune response to hepatitis C virus. Dr. Cheung is studing various aspects of hepatitis C, both clinical and translational research.

  • Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Contribution of T cells to immunocompetence and autoimmunity; how the immune system clears infection, avoids autoimmunity and how infection impacts on the development of immune responses.

  • Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group's primary objectives are:

    1) Novel radioligand and radiotracer development.
    We will develop novel PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging agents with MIPS and Stanford faculty as well as other outside collaborations including academia and pharmaceutical industry. Although my personal research interests will be to discover and design of candidate probes that target molecular targets in the brain, our group focus will primarily be on cancer biology and gene therapy. In conjunction with our state-of-the-art imaging facility, promising candidates will be evaluated by PET-CT/MR imaging in small animals and primates. Successful radioligands and/or radiotracers will be extended towards future human clinical applications.

    2) Designing new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies.
    We will aim to design new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies that may have utility for future radiopharmaceutical development in our lab and the general radiochemistry community.

    3) Radiochemistry production of routine clinical tracers.
    Since we also have many interests with many Stanford faculty and outside collaborators, our efforts will also include the routine radiochemistry production of many existing radiotracers for human and non-human use. Our routine clinical tracers will be synthesized in custom-made or commercial synthetic modules (i.e. GE TRACERlab modules) housed in lead-shielded cells and be distributed manually or automatically (i.e. Comecer Dorothea) to our imagers.

  • Bill Chiu

    Bill Chiu

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Chiu obtained his B.S. degree in Biological Sciences and graduated with Honors from Stanford University. After graduating, he received his Medical Degree at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where he remained for his internship and General Surgery residency training. Dr. Chiu completed his Pediatric Surgery training at The Children?s Hospital of Philadelphia. He is an Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has an active research program studying innovative approaches to treat patients with neuroblastoma.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests After shuttering the wet lab, we have focused on: a point-of-care device to measure blood ammonia and prevent brain damage; a human protein complex that juxtaposes and joins DNA ends for repair and V(D)J recombination; and strategies for teaching students and for reducing selection bias in educational programs.

  • Katrin Chua

    Katrin Chua

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab is interested in understanding molecular processes that underlie aging and age-associated pathologies in mammals. We focus on a family of genes, the SIRTs, which regulate stress resistance and lifespan in lower organisms such as yeast, worms, and flies. In mammals, we recently uncovered a number of ways in which SIRT factors may contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating resistance to various forms of stress. We have now begun to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which these SIRT factors function. In particular, we are interested in how SIRT factors regulate chromatin, the molecular structure in which the DNA of mammalian genomes is packaged, and how such functions may link genome maintenance to stress resistance and aging.

  • Karlene Cimprich

    Karlene Cimprich

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genomic instability contributes to many diseases, but it also underlies many natural processes. The Cimprich lab is focused on understanding how mammalian cells maintain genomic stability in the context of DNA replication stress and DNA damage. We are interested in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to replication stress and DNA damage as well as the links between DNA damage and replication stress to human disease.

  • Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Karel H. and Avice N. Beekhuis Professor in Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Clarke maintains a laboratory focused on two areas of research: i) the control of self-renewal of normal stem cells and diseases such as cancer and hereditary diseases; and ii) the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells. His laboratory is investigating how perturbations of stem cell regulatory machinery contributes to human disease. In particular, the laboratory is investigating epigenetic regulators of self renewal, the process by which stem cells regenerate themselves.

  • Michael Cleary

    Michael Cleary

    Lindhard Family Professor in Pediatric Cancer Biology and Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The role of oncoproteins in cancer and development; molecular and cellular biology of hematologic malignancies; targeted molecular therapies of cancer.

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Shriram Chair of Bioengineering, Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular Engineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Harvey Cohen

    Harvey Cohen

    Deborah E. Addicott - John A. Kriewall and Elizabeth A. Haehl Family Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests extend from hypothesis-driven studies in biochemistry and cell biology to discovery-driven interests in proteomics and systems biology to clinical treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children, and pediatric palliative care.

  • Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Genetics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study mechanisms that affect the expression and decay of normal and abnormal mRNAs, and also RNA-related mechanisms that regulate microbial antibiotic resistance. A small bioinformatics team within our lab has developed knowledge based systems to aid in investigations of genes.

  • A. Dimitrios Colevas

    A. Dimitrios Colevas

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Multi- modality treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    Phase 1 clinical trials

  • Christos E. Constantinou

    Christos E. Constantinou

    Associate Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main recent interest is the application of Biomedical Engineering approaches for the clinical visualization and characterization of the static and dynamic properties of pelvic floor function. This extends to ultrasound Imaging and image processing, construction of computer models and biomechanics analysis of pelvic floor function. It is envisioned that these considerations are important constituents of the clinical evaluation of patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction and urodynamics.

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Over the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Steven Coutre

    Steven Coutre

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research integrates clinical care of patients with novel treatments for a variety of hematologic disorders. I see patients with a wide range of problems with a particular focus on chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma. I provide comprehensive consultative services as well as treatment for both the acute and chronic leukemias as well as non-malignant conditions such as clotting disorders and thrombocytopenia.

  • Gerald Crabtree

    Gerald Crabtree

    Department of Pathology Professor in Experimental Pathology and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Chromatin regulation and its roles in human cancer and the development of the nervous system. Engineering new methods for studying and controlling chromatin in living cells.

  • Mark R. Cullen, MD

    Mark R. Cullen, MD

    Director, Center for Population Health Sciences, Professor of Medicine, of Biomedical Data Science, of Health Research & Policy & Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Social and environmental determinants of health; role of workplace physical environment and work organization as causes of chronic disease and disability

  • Christina Curtis

    Christina Curtis

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Curtis laboratory is focused on the development and application of innovative experimental, computational, and analytical approaches to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and early detection of cancer.

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