School of Medicine

Showing 1-10 of 17 Results

  • Rajni Agarwal-Hashmi

    Rajni Agarwal-Hashmi

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Hematopoietic Stem cell biology-created a SCID mouse model to study engraftment of cord blood derived hematopoietic cells and use of this model to develop gene transfer technology for Fanconi anemia.
    Clinical research interests are to develop new protocols to reduce graft vs host disease,treatment of viral infections post transplant and use of manipulated HSC graft in patients who receive mismatched donor transplants.

  • Michael Amylon

    Michael Amylon

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a treatment modality which is being broadly applied to a growing number of disorders. Increasing success with BMT is offering improved survival to pediatric and adult patients with acute leukemia, chronic leukemia, lymphomas, and a variety of solid tumors as well as severe aplastic anemia.

  • Rosa Bacchetta

    Rosa Bacchetta

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In the coming years, I plan to further determine the genetic and immunological basis of diseases with autoimmunity or immune dysregulation in children. I believe that much can still be learned from the in depth mechanistic studies of pediatric autoimmune diseases. Genomic analysis of the patients' samples has become possible which may provide a rapid indication of altered target molecules. I plan to implement robust functional studies to define the consequences of these genetic abnormalities and bridge them to the patient's clinical phenotype.

    Understanding functional consequences of gene mutations in single case/family first and then validating the molecular and cellular defects in other patients with similar phenotypes, will anticipate and complement cellular and gene therapy strategies.

    For further information please visit the Bacchetta Lab website:

  • Alice Bertaina

    Alice Bertaina

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Bertaina is a highly experienced clinician and will play a key role in supporting Section Chief Dr. Rajni Agarwal and Clinical Staff in the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital. She will also continue her research on immune recovery and miRNA, understanding the mechanisms underlying immune reconstitution, Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), and leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT in pediatric patients affected by hematological malignant and non-malignant disorders.

  • Agnieszka Czechowicz

    Agnieszka Czechowicz

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Czechowicz?s research is aimed at understanding how hematopoietic stem cells interact with their microenvironment in order to subsequently modulate these interactions to improve bone marrow transplantation and unlock biological secrets that further enable regenerative medicine broadly. This work can be applied across a variety of disease states ranging from rare genetic diseases, autoimmune diseases, solid organ transplantation, microbiome-augmentation and cancer.

  • Daniel Dever

    Daniel Dever

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio Dr. Daniel Dever is a Research Instructor in the laboratory of Dr. Matthew Porteus at Stanford University, in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine. He completed his PhD in molecular toxicology at the University of Rochester where he studied the mechanisms of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in mediating cerebellar transcriptional programs. During his postdoctoral work in the Porteus group, he (with others) developed a CRISPR/Cas9-based beta-globin (HBB) gene editing by homologous recombination methodology (gene targeting) in CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat severe sickle cell disease. Dr. Dever (along with collaborators) has now successfully used this methodology to efficiently target >15 genes in primary blood cells that are associated with hematopoiesis, hematopoietic genetic diseases, hematopoietic malignancies, or safe harbor sites. Dr. Dever's primary research interests are to continue to leverage CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing technologies to study the molecular mechanisms of gene targeting in human hematopoietic stem cells with the ultimate goal of optimizing and further developing novel cell and gene therapies for disease of the blood and the immune system. Currently, he is leading IND-enabling preclinical efficacy, feasibility, safety and tumorigenicity studies for FDA approval of a first-in-human clinical trial at Stanford in 2018 for the treatment of severe sickle cell disease using CRISPR/Cas9-based HBB gene targeting in autologous hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Melissa Mavers

    Melissa Mavers

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio I am a physician-scientist currently in my third year of fellowship training in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, with a research focus and clinical interest in stem cell transplantation. I completed my MD degree and PhD in Molecular Microbiology and Immunology through the combined MD/PhD Program at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, during which time I joined the laboratory of Dr. Harris Perlman (now Chief of Rheumatology at Northwestern University/Feinberg School of Medicine). For this project, I investigated the role of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production and treating inflammatory diseases and gained experience in molecular biology and immunology research techniques. This project led to the publication of several first-author and middle-author publications as well as an invited review article. I then completed my Pediatrics Internship and Residency training at the University of California Los Angeles/Mattel Children?s Hospital, and subsequently entered the Pediatric Hematology and Oncology fellowship program at Stanford University/Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital. I am conducting my post-doctoral research in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Negrin (Division Chief of Blood and Marrow Transplantation at Stanford University Hospital and former President of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation). For this project, I am investigating expansion and enhancement of function of regulatory T and invariant natural killer T cells in stem cell transplantation to prevent or reduce acute graft-versus-host disease. These experiences have helped to shape my career goal of using cutting edge technology to investigate methods of immune modification in the prevention or reduction of graft versus host disease.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: