Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Surgical Critical Care

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Clinical Instructor Trauma and General Surgery Department of Surgery, University of Nevada School of Medicine (2004 - 2006)
  • Assistant Professor of Surgery Division of Trauma Surgery and Critical Care, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine (2006 - 2007)
  • Assistant Program Director Acute Care Surgery Fellowship, University of Nevada School of Medicine (2007 - 2011)
  • Program Director, Acute Care Surgery Fellowship Division Trauma and Surgical Critical Care, University of Nevada School of Medicine (2012 - 2014)
  • Chief, Section of Trauma Surgery, University of Nevada School of Medicine (2012 - 2014)
  • Assistant Professor of Surgery Department of Surgery, University of Nevada School of Medicine (2007 - 2013)
  • Associate Professor of Surgery Department of Surgery, University of Nevada School of Medicine (2013 - 2014)
  • Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery, Trauma Director of Education, Stanford University School of Medicine (2014 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Beta Beta Beta, Biology Honorary Society (1994-Present)
  • Academic Distinction in Major Whittier College, Whittier College (1994)
  • Rhodes Scholarship State Finalist, Rhodes State (1994)
  • Scholarship, McCoskey Scholarship (1997-1998)
  • Applicant National LCME Student Representative, LCME (1997)
  • Resident Award for Humanism and Excellence in Teaching, Arnold P. Gold Foundatiodn (2003)
  • Junior Faculty Research Grant, University of Nevada (2008)
  • Research and Education Scholarship, American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (2008)
  • Distinguished Alumni Speaker, Department of Surgery, University of Nevada School of Medicine (2011)
  • Las Vegas Top Doc, Las Vegas Life Magazine (2012)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Board member, Nevada Donor Network Organ Procurement Agency (2008 - Present)
  • Member of Advisory Committee, Academic Affairs and Development, UNSOM (2008 - 2008)
  • Participant in Candidate Group, American College of Surgeons (2001 - 2006)
  • Member, Society of Critical Care Medicine (2004 - Present)
  • Member, Eastern Association Surgery of Trauma (2006 - Present)
  • Associate Fellow, Southwestern Surgical Congress (2005 - Present)
  • Fellow, Association of Surgical Education (2014 - Present)
  • Fellow, American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (2007 - Present)
  • Fellow, American College of Surgeons (2007 - Present)
  • Committee Member, American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Acute Care Surgery (2008 - Present)
  • Vice Chairman for Nevada, american College of Surgeons, American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (2012 - 2014)
  • Bio-design Clinical Advisory Board, Stanford University (2014 - 2015)
  • Panel to Advise Research on Trauma, Stanford University School of Medicine (2015 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Surgical Critical Care, American Board of Surgery (2007)
  • Board Certification: General Surgery, American Board of Surgery (2005)
  • Residency:University of Nevada General Surgery Residency (2004) CA
  • Internship:University of Nevada General Surgery Residency (1999) CA
  • Medical Education:University of Nevada School of Medicine (1998) NV
  • Fellowship:University of Nevada Acute Care Surgery FellowshipNV

Teaching

2019-20 Courses


Publications

All Publications


  • The clinical significance of circulating soluble RAGE in patients with severe sepsis JOURNAL OF TRAUMA AND ACUTE CARE SURGERY Chestovich, P. J., Browder, T. D., Morrissey, S. L., Fraser, D. R., Ingalls, N. K., Fildes, J. J. 2015; 78 (6): 1076-1083
  • Minimally invasive is maximally effective: Diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy for penetrating abdominal injuries. journal of trauma and acute care surgery Chestovich, P. J., Browder, T. D., Morrissey, S. L., Fraser, D. R., Ingalls, N. K., Fildes, J. J. 2015; 78 (6): 1076-1085

    Abstract

    Laparoscopic techniques have evolved, allowing increased capabilities within most subspecialties of general surgery, but have failed to gain traction managing injured patients. We hypothesized that laparoscopy is effective in the diagnosis and treatment of penetrating abdominal injuries.We retrospectively reviewed patients undergoing abdominal exploration following penetrating trauma at our Level 1 trauma center during a 6-year period from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2013. Demographic and resuscitation data were obtained from our trauma registry. Charts were reviewed for operative details, hospital course, and complications. Hospital length of stay (LOS) and complications were primary end points. Patients were classified as having nontherapeutic diagnostic laparoscopy (DL), nontherapeutic diagnostic celiotomy (DC), therapeutic laparoscopy (TL), or therapeutic celiotomy (TC). TL patients were case-matched 2:1 with TC patients having similar intra-abdominal injuries.A total of 518 patients, including 281 patients (55%) with stab wounds and 237 patients (45%) with gunshot wounds, were identified. Celiotomy was performed in 380 patients (73%), laparoscopy in 138 (27%), with 44 (32%) converted to celiotomy. Nontherapeutic explorations were compared including 70 DLs and 46 DCs with similar injury severity. LOS was shorter in DLs compared with DCs (1 day vs. 4 days, p < 0.001). There were no missed injuries. Therapeutic explorations were compared by matching all TL patients 2:1 to TC patients with similar type and severity of injuries. Twenty-four patients underwent TL compared with 48 TC patients in the case matched group. LOS was shorter in the TL group than in the TC group (4 days vs. 2 days, p < 0.001). Wound infections were more common with open exploration (10.4% vs. 0%, p = 0.002), and more patients developed ileus or small bowel obstruction after open exploration (9.4% vs. 1.1%, p = 0.018).Laparoscopy is safe and accurate in penetrating abdominal injuries. The use of laparoscopy resulted in shorter hospitalization, fewer postoperative wound infection and ileus complications, as well as no missed injuries.Therapeutic study, level IV.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/TA.0000000000000655

    View details for PubMedID 26151506

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