Bio

Bio


Teresa LaFromboise is counseling psychologist by training and a professor of education in Developmental and Psychological Sciences in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Her research has focused on efforts of non-dominant racial/ethnic groups to thrive in the face of adversity including acculturation demands, discrimination, and major life challenges. She has extensive experience in developing and testing school and community-based psychological interventions with AIAN adolescents, as exemplified in the American Indian Life Skills Curriculum (AILS). She has long-standing collaborations with tribal communities in the area of AI/AN education and health. She contributes to the Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health at the University of Colorado School of Public Health and the Child Health Research Institute at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In addition to extensive clinical experience with AI/AN populations, she Chairs the Native American Studies program at Stanford University. She is a past-President of the Society of Indian Psychologists, a fellow of the American Psychological Association, a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, and a past-member of the Committee on Rural Health of the American Psychological Association. She is currently conducting research in a community-initiated study of School Belonging, Cultural Revitalization and Academic Engagement in a reservation secondary school and tribal college.

Administrative Appointments


  • Professor, Graduate School of Education, Stanford University (2009 - Present)
  • Associate Professor of Counseling Psychology, School of Education, Stanford University (1994 - 2009)
  • Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology, Stanford University (1985 - 1989)
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology, Stanford University (1984 - 1985)
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology, Stanford University (1983 - 1984)
  • Chair, Native American Studies, Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity (2011 - 2019)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Andrew J. Mellon Scholar, Institute for Urban and Minority Education and Teachers College, Columbia University (2004 - Present)
  • Libra Distinguished Professor, College of Education and Human Development, University of Southern Maine (2000 - 2001)
  • Research Associate, National Center for American Indian/Alaska Native Health Research, University of Colorado (1986 - Present)
  • Faculty Associate, Wisconsin Center for Education Research (1990 - 1994)
  • Associate Professor of Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison (1990 - 1994)
  • Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (1979 - 1984)
  • Research Associate, National Center for American Indian/Alaska Native Health, University of Colorado (2019 - Present)
  • Affiliated Scholar, Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, Stanford University (2019 - Present)
  • Affiliated Scholar, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, Native American Research Center, University of California-Berkeley (2019 - Present)
  • Member, Child Health Research Institute, School of Medicine, Stanford University (2019 - Present)

Professional Education


  • PhD, University of Oklahoma, Counseling Psychology (1979)
  • M Ed, University of North Dakota-Grand Forks, Elementary Education (1975)
  • BA, Butler University, Indianapolis, Liberal Arts (1971)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Dr. LaFromboise is concerned with helping students respond effectively to acculturation pressure, cultural adjustment, discrimination, major life transitions and other stresses that are so typical--and so often neglected--in children and adolescents. As a counseling psychologist with clinical and teaching experience in a wide variety of university and American Indian/Alaska Native reservation/village settings, Dr. LaFromboise is well-equipped to guide new professionals in school and community evidence-based interventions. She is the developer of the American Indian Life Skills Development Curriculum of problem-based lessons aimed at increasing social emotional competence and reducing the risk of suicide among American Indian/Alaska Native adolescents. Proven successful with high school students, this curriculum has been extended to younger students. She is investigating cultural, social, and psychological indicators of adolescent risk behavior, school belongingness, and bicultural involvement.

Projects


  • Integration of Conventional and Indigenous Therapeutic Interventions with a Native American University Client

    Co-authoring a case study report entitled "Integration of Conventional and Indigenous Therapeutic Interventions with a Native American University Client."

    Location

    United States

    Collaborators

    • N. Brown, Co-author, .
  • Bullying, depression, and suicidal ideation

    Co-authoring a manuscript entitled, "Bullying, depression, and suicidal ideation."

    Location

    United States

    Collaborators

    • S. Malik , Co-author, .
    • N. Ruedas-Gracia, Co-author, .
  • Co-authoring manuscripts from the School Belonging, Ethnic Identity and Academic Engagement Project

    Location

    United States

    Collaborators

    • S. Malik, Co-author, .
    • S. Hussain, Co-author, .
    • N. Ruedas-Gracia, Co-author, .
  • Revising the American Indian Life Skills Development Curriculum for Early Adolescents

    Location

    United States

  • Creating a digital version of the American Indian Life Skills Development Curriculum: ASPIRE

    Location

    United States

Teaching

2019-20 Courses


Stanford Advisees


Publications

All Publications


  • CONCEPTUALIZING SCHOOL BELONGINGNESS IN NATIVE YOUTH: FACTOR ANALYSIS OF THE PSYCHOLOGICAL SENSE OF SCHOOL MEMBERSHIP SCALE AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH Hussain, S., Domingue, B. W., LaFromboise, T., Ruedas-Gracia, N. 2018; 25 (3): 26?51

    Abstract

    The Psychological Sense of School Membership (PSSM) scale is widely used to measure school belongingness among adolescents. However, previous studies identify inconsistencies in factor structures across different populations. The factor structure of the PSSM has yet to be examined with American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth, a population of keen interest given reports of their educational and health disparities, and the potential of belongingness as a protective factor against risk behaviors. Thus, this study examined the factor structure of the PSSM in two samples of AI adolescents (N = 349). The two main aims of this study were to 1) determine if a comparable factor structure exists between the two AI groups and 2) examine the factor structure of the PSSM for use in AI/AN populations. Randomization analysis was used to test research aim one, and exploratory factor analysis was used to test research aim two. Analyses revealed that comparable factor structures existed based on responses from the two AI groups. Analyses also identified two factors: school identification/peer support and connection with teachers. Moreover, negatively worded statements were found to be unreliable and were removed from the final scale, reducing the PSSM to 13 items. Findings from this study will assist researchers and clinicians with assessing sense of school belongingness in AI/AN adolescents and with appropriately interpreting aspects of belongingness for this population.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000447634800002

    View details for PubMedID 30320875

  • Development and evaluation of an enhanced diabetes prevention program with psychosocial support for urban American Indians and Alaska natives: A randomized controlled trial CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS Rosas, L. G., Vasquez, J. J., Naderi, R., Jeffery, N., Hedlin, H., Qin, F., LaFromboise, T., Megginson, N., Pasqua, C., Flores, O., McClinton-Brown, R., Evans, J., Stafford, R. S. 2016; 50: 28-36

    Abstract

    Diabetes is highly prevalent, affecting over 25 million adults in the US, yet it can be effectively prevented through lifestyle interventions, including the well-tested Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) adults, the majority of whom live in urban settings, are more than twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-Hispanic whites. Additionally, prevalent mental health issues and psychosocial stressors may facilitate progression to diabetes and hinder successful implementation of lifestyle interventions for AIAN adults. This 2-phased study first engaged community stakeholders to develop culturally-tailored strategies to address mental health concerns and psychosocial stressors. Pilot testing (completed) refined those strategies that increase engagement in an enhanced DPP for urban AIAN adults. Second, the enhanced DPP will be compared to a standard DPP in a randomized controlled trial (ongoing) with a primary outcome of body mass index (BMI) and a secondary outcome of quality of life (QoL) over 12months. Obese self-identified AIAN adults residing in an urban setting with one or more components of the metabolic syndrome (excluding waist circumference) will be randomized to the enhanced or standard DPP (n=204). We hypothesize that addressing psychosocial barriers within a culturally-tailored DPP will result in clinical (BMI) and superior patient-centered (QoL) outcomes as compared to a standard DPP. Exploratory outcomes will include cardiometabolic risk factors (e.g., waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose) and health behaviors (e.g., diet, physical activity). Results of this trial may be applicable to other urban AIAN or minority communities or even diabetes prevention in general.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2016.06.015

    View details for Web of Science ID 000385321600005

    View details for PubMedID 27381232

  • A culturally informed approach to American Indian/Alaska Native youth suicide prevention. NYS TSOL Journal LaFromboise, T., Malik, S. S. 2016
  • Advancing Suicide Prevention Research With Rural American Indian and Alaska Native Populations AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Wexler, L., Chandler, M., Gone, J. P., Cwik, M., Kirmayer, L. J., LaFromboise, T., Brockie, T., O'Keefe, V., Walkup, J., Allen, J. 2015; 105 (5): 891-899

    Abstract

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance's prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond.

    View details for DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2014.302517

    View details for Web of Science ID 000358295600031

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4386511

  • Healing One Story at a Time: American Indian/Alaska Native Social Justice The Praeger Handbook of Social Justice and Psychology [3 volumes] Moorehead, V., LaFromboise, T. D. 2014: 135
  • The Interrelationship Between the Society of Indian Psychologists and Counseling Psychology COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGIST Gray, J. S., Carter, P. M., LaFromboise, T. D., BigFoot, D. S. 2012; 40 (5): 685-698
  • Toward an applied developmental science for Native children, families, and communities Child Development Perspectives Spicer, P., LaFramboise, T., Markstrom, C., Niles, M., West, A., Fehringer, K., Grayson, L., Sarche, M. 2012; 6 (1): 49-54
  • American Indian life skills: A community-based intervention for indigenous mental health American Indian and Alaska Native Children and mental health: Development, context, prevention and treatment LaFromboise, T. D., Fatemi, A. S. 2011: 309-336
  • Hopelessness Among White- and Indian-Identified American Indian Adolescents CULTURAL DIVERSITY & ETHNIC MINORITY PSYCHOLOGY Albright, K., LaFromboise, T. D. 2010; 16 (3): 437-442

    Abstract

    Despite a number of investigations into the protective effects of ethnic and cultural identity among a variety of diverse populations, there have been relatively few studies that examine the relationship between this identity and American Indian mental health. This brief report investigates the associations between ethnic/cultural identification and feelings of hopelessness among American Indian adolescents. Data were drawn from middle-school respondents on a reservation community at 2 time points 14 months apart. Although White cultural identification was significantly and negatively correlated with hopelessness at 14 months, Indian cultural identification was not associated with hopelessness at either time point. These results are discussed with attention to the developmental stage of our respondents and to the possibility of social dynamics relevant to this particular reservation community.

    View details for DOI 10.1037/a0019887

    View details for Web of Science ID 000280350400017

    View details for PubMedID 20658888

  • Patterns of Hopelessness Among American Indian Adolescents: Relationships by Levels of Acculturation and Residence CULTURAL DIVERSITY & ETHNIC MINORITY PSYCHOLOGY LaFromboise, T. D., Albright, K., Harris, A. 2010; 16 (1): 68-76

    Abstract

    Poor mental health among American Indian adolescents has been a matter of significant concern for the past two decades. This study extends the literature on acculturation within this population by investigating the relationship between hopelessness, levels of acculturation, and residence among American Indian adolescents. Utilizing data drawn from 438 adolescents across 67 American Indian tribes, our analyses show that American Indian adolescents who have bicultural competence (i.e., those who are adept in both Indian and White cultures) have significantly less hopelessness than do those with adeptness in only one culture or in neither culture. Our findings also show a significant difference by residence, with American Indians who live on reservations indicating less hopelessness than those living in urban or rural/nonreservation areas. Analysis of interaction effects suggests that the beneficial effect of adeptness in White culture is particularly true for American Indians living in urban areas.

    View details for DOI 10.1037/a0016181

    View details for Web of Science ID 000274522100008

    View details for PubMedID 20099966

  • The Zuni Life Skills Development Program: A school/community-based suicide prevention intervention SUICIDE AND LIFE-THREATENING BEHAVIOR LaFromboise, T. D., Lewis, H. A. 2008; 38 (3): 343-353

    Abstract

    The Zuni Life Skills Development Program, an effective community-initiated and high-school-based suicide prevention intervention, is featured. Development and evaluation of this intervention are followed by note of the specific challenges associated with stabilizing the program. A more tribally diverse, culturally-informed model entitled the American Indian Life Skills Development Curriculum is then presented to illustrate a hybrid approach to the cultural tailoring of interventions. This curriculum is broad enough to address concerns across diverse American Indian tribal groups yet respectful of distinctive and heterogeneous cultural beliefs and practices. Finally, we reflect upon issues in community-based research that emerged during this collaboration.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000257344900011

    View details for PubMedID 18611133

  • Psychosocial and cultural correlates of suicidal ideation among American Indian early adolescents on a northern plains reservation Research in Human Development LaFromboise, T. D., Medoff, L., Lee, C. C., Harris, A. 2007; 4 (1-2): 119-143
  • Family, community, and school influences on resilience among American Indian adolescents in the upper Midwest JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY LaFromboise, T. D., Hoyr, D. R., Oliver, L., Whitbeck, L. B. 2006; 34 (2): 193-209

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jcop.20090

    View details for Web of Science ID 000235416200007

  • State of the science on psychosocial interventions for ethnic minorities ANNUAL REVIEW OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Miranda, J., Bernal, G., Lau, A., Kohn, L., Hwang, W., LaFromboise, T. 2005; 1: 113-142
  • Perceived discrimination, traditional practices, and depressive symptoms among American Indians in the upper Midwest JOURNAL OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR Whitbeck, L. B., McMorris, B. J., Hoyt, D. R., Stubben, J. D., LAFROMBOISE, T. 2002; 43 (4): 400-418

    Abstract

    American Indian adults are thought to experience significant depressive symptoms at rates several times higher than adults in the general population, yet we know very little about factors associated with depressive symptoms among this under studied group. Many researchers have argued that depressive symptoms are associated with conflicts between American Indian traditional cultural values, practices, and beliefs and those of the majority culture. This report, based on a sample 287 American Indian adults from the upper Midwest, takes into account two measures of cultural effects: perceived discrimination, as one indicator of culture conflict, and traditional practices, as a measure of cultural identification. The results indicate that discrimination is strongly associated with depressive symptoms among American Indian adults and that engaging in traditional practices is negatively related to depressive symptoms. Moreover, interaction effects between perceived discrimination and traditional practices indicate that engaging in traditional practices buffers the negative effects of discrimination among those who regularly participate in them.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000181408800002

    View details for PubMedID 12664673

  • The unretiring John Krumboltz COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGIST LaFromboise, T. D., Neumann, H. 2002; 30 (3): 441-459
  • Effects of cultural identification and disability status on perceived community rehabilitation needs of American Indians JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION Pichette, E. F., Berven, N. L., MENZ, F. E., LAFROMBOISE, T. D. 1997; 63 (4): 38-44
  • Help-seeking behavior of Native American Indian high school students PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY-RESEARCH AND PRACTICE BEEGATES, D., HOWARDPITNEY, B., LAFROMBOISE, T., Rowe, W. 1996; 27 (5): 495-499
  • THE ZUNI LIFE SKILLS DEVELOPMENT CURRICULUM - DESCRIPTION AND EVALUATION OF A SUICIDE-PREVENTION PROGRAM JOURNAL OF COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY LAFROMBOISE, T., HOWARDPITNEY, B. 1995; 42 (4): 479-486
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF BICULTURALISM - EVIDENCE AND THEORY PSYCHOLOGICAL BULLETIN LAFROMBOISE, T., COLEMAN, H. L., Gerton, J. 1993; 114 (3): 395-412

    Abstract

    A vital step in the development of an equal partnership for minorities in the academic, social, and economic life of the United States involves moving away from assumptions of the linear model of cultural acquisition. In this article we review the literature on the psychological impact of being bicultural. Assimilation, acculturation, alternation, multicultural, and fusion models that have been used to describe the psychological processes, social experiences, and individual challenges and obstacles of being bicultural are reviewed and summarized for their contributions and implications for investigations of the psychological impact of biculturalism. Emphasis is given to the alternation model, which posits that an individual is able to gain competence within 2 cultures without losing his or her cultural identity or having to choose one culture over the other. Finally, a hypothetical model outlining the dimensions of bicultural competence is presented.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993MG35900001

    View details for PubMedID 8272463

  • AN INTERPERSONAL ANALYSIS OF AFFINITY, CLARIFICATION, AND HELPFUL RESPONSES WITH AMERICAN-INDIANS PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY-RESEARCH AND PRACTICE LAFROMBOISE, T. D. 1992; 23 (4): 281-286
  • DEVELOPMENT AND FACTOR STRUCTURE OF THE CROSS-CULTURAL COUNSELING INVENTORY REVISED PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY-RESEARCH AND PRACTICE LAFROMBOISE, T. D., COLEMAN, H. L., HERNANDEZ, A. 1991; 22 (5): 380-388
  • COUNSELING INTERVENTION AND AMERICAN-INDIAN TRADITION - AN INTEGRATIVE APPROACH COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGIST LAFROMBOISE, T. D., Trimble, J. E., Mohatt, G. V. 1990; 18 (4): 628-654
  • CHANGING AND DIVERSE ROLES OF WOMEN IN AMERICAN-INDIAN CULTURES SEX ROLES LAFROMBOISE, T. D., HEYLE, A. M., Ozer, E. J. 1990; 22 (7-8): 455-476
  • ORGANIZATIONAL AND POLITICAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY - RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CHANGE COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGIST Brammer, L., Alcorn, J., Birk, J., GAZDA, G., Hurst, J., LAFROMBOISE, T., Newman, R., OSIPOW, S., Packard, T., Romero, D., Scott, N. 1988; 16 (3): 407-422
  • CULTURAL AND COGNITIVE CONSIDERATIONS IN THE PREVENTION OF AMERICAN-INDIAN ADOLESCENT SUICIDE JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENCE LAFROMBOISE, T. D., Bigfoot, D. S. 1988; 11 (2): 139-153

    Abstract

    A description of cultural considerations associated with American Indian adolescent coping is presented within a transactional, cognitive-phenomenological framework. Select cultural values and cultural beliefs of American Indians associated with death are discussed in terms of person variables and situational demand characteristics that interplay in the transactional coping process. Three situational demand characteristics (ambiguity of identity, frequency of loss, and pervasiveness of hardships) are then presented to illustrate the reciprocal relationship between environmental contingencies and American Indian individual and community efforts at coping. The dynamic interdependence between person and environmental variables is emphasized and considered essential for inclusion in the design of interventions to prevent suicide. Existing intervention efforts with American Indian adolescent suicide attempters are reviewed and a school-wide cognitive behavioural approach based on the transactional model of coping with suicide is described. It is suggested that on-going cognitive restructuring, social skills training, and peer counselling training activities be culturally adapted and integrated into relevant areas of the school curricula in order that coping be enhanced and suicide ameliorated.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988N685600004

    View details for PubMedID 3403749

  • AMERICAN-INDIAN MENTAL-HEALTH POLICY AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGIST LAFROMBOISE, T. D. 1988; 43 (5): 388-397

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988N529200005

    View details for PubMedID 3389584

  • THE ROLE OF CULTURAL-DIVERSITY IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGIST LAFROMBOISE, T. D. 1985; 13 (4): 649-655

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