Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Neurology - Child Neurology
  • Neuro-ophthalmology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Fellowship: University of Pennsylvania Ophthalmology Fellowships (2015) PA
  • Residency: UCSF Child Neurology Residency (2014) CA
  • Internship: UCSF Pediatric Residency (2011) CA
  • Medical Education: Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine Registrar (2009) VA
  • Board Certification: Neurology - Child Neurology, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (2015)

Publications

All Publications


  • Update in Pediatric Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome. Seminars in neurology Beres, S. J. 2020

    Abstract

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is a rare condition in children presenting with headache and papilledema from increased intracranial pressure that can cause significant morbidity. This can be idiopathic, also known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension or primary intracranial hypertension, or can be secondary to medications and associated medical conditions. Given the threat to vision, early detection and treatment is needed in all age groups. However, identifying papilledema or pseudopapilledema in children presents unique challenges sometimes as a result of differences between prepubertal and postpubertal children, further elucidating the complex pathophysiology. Management requires brain imaging, lumbar puncture, and frequent eye exams with medical and rarely surgical treatment. Visual outcomes in children are favorable if caught early and management can be prolonged over years. Pediatric PTCS is different from adult PTCS in many ways, and this review will focus on the most updated definitions of the disease, theories of pathophysiology, management, and treatment in the pediatric population.

    View details for DOI 10.1055/s-0040-1708847

    View details for PubMedID 32422670

  • Anatomic and Thermometric Analysis of Cranial Nerve Palsy after Laser Amygdalohippocampotomy for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy. Operative neurosurgery (Hagerstown, Md.) Huang, Y., Leung, S. A., Parker, J. J., Ho, A. L., Wintermark, M., Patel, S. H., Pauly, K. B., Kakusa, B. W., Beres, S. J., Henderson, J. M., Grant, G. A., Halpern, C. H. 2019

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive therapy for treating medication-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Cranial nerve (CN) palsy has been reported as a procedural complication, but the mechanism of this complication is not understood.OBJECTIVE: To identify the cause of postoperative CN palsy after LITT.METHODS: Four medial temporal lobe epilepsy patients with CN palsy after LITT were identified for comparison with 22 consecutive patients with no palsy. We evaluated individual variation in the distance between CN III and the uncus, and CN IV and the parahippocampal gyrus using preoperative T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. Intraoperative MR thermometry was used to estimate temperature changes.RESULTS: CN III (n=2) and CN IV palsies (n=2) were reported. On preoperative imaging, the majority of identified CN III (54%) and CN IV (43%) were located within 1 to 2 mm of the uncus and parahippocampal gyrus tissue border, respectively. Affected CN III and CN IV were more likely to be found<1 mm of the tissue border (PCNIII=.03, PCNIV<.01; chi-squared test). Retrospective assessment of thermal profile during ablation showed higher temperature rise along the mesial temporal lobe tissue border in affected CNs than unaffected CNs after controlling for distance (12.9C vs 5.8C; P=.03; 2-sample t-test).CONCLUSION: CN palsy after LITT likely results from direct heating of the respective CN running at extreme proximity to the mesial temporal lobe. Low-temperature thresholds set at the border of the mesial temporal lobe in patients whose CNs are at close proximity may reduce this risk.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/ons/opz279

    View details for PubMedID 31555820

  • Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa in children JOURNAL OF AAPOS Mercado, C. L., Pham, B. H., Beres, S., Marmor, M. F., Lambert, S. R. 2018; 22 (6): 457?61
  • Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome is the Best Term for This Condition PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Beres, S. J., Digre, K. B., Friedman, D. I., Liu, G. T. 2018; 87: 9?10
  • Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome is the Best Term for This Condition. Pediatric neurology Beres, S. J., Digre, K. B., Friedman, D. I., Liu, G. T. 2018; 87: 9?10

    View details for PubMedID 30501891

  • Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa in children. Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Mercado, C. L., Pham, B. H., Beres, S., Marmor, M. F., Lambert, S. R. 2018

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of rare inherited retinal disorders characterized by diffuse progressive degeneration of the retina that typically presents bilaterally. Unilateral RP has not often been reported in children. We present a series of cases that illustrate discrimination between unilateral and asymmetric disease and between dystrophy and acquired degeneration.METHODS: Four patients (9-15 years of age; 3 females) were referred to our institution for possible unilateral RP based on fundus appearance and unilateral symptoms. All underwent full-field electroretinography (ERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), widefield and color fundus photography, and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging. Genetic testing and a vitamin and essential fatty acids panel were also conducted in 1 patient.RESULTS: Unilateral retinal degeneration was confirmed in 2 patients, whose fellow eyes showed no abnormalities on ERG or imaging. The other 2 patients were found to have highly asymmetric retinal degeneration based on ERG, wide-angle images, and repeated examinations (range, 0.3-9.8 years). Genetic testing and blood testing in 1 unilateral case were negative.CONCLUSIONS: Childhood-onset "unilateral RP" remains a difficult and uncertain diagnosis. ERG testing and longitudinal and widefield fundus examination are necessary to exclude asymmetrical disease. Although unilateral degeneration may exist in some children, its inherited or acquired etiology remains poorly understood.

    View details for PubMedID 30243749

  • Optic Pathway Gliomas Secondary to Neurofibromatosis Type 1 SEMINARS IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Beres, S., Avery, R. A. 2017; 24 (2): 92?99

    Abstract

    Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 frequently manifest optic pathway gliomas-low-grade gliomas intrinsic to the visual pathway. This review describes the molecular and genetic mechanisms driving optic pathway gliomas as well as the clinical symptoms of this relatively common genetic condition. Recommendations for clinical management and descriptions of the newest imaging techniques are discussed.

    View details for PubMedID 28941532

  • Pediatric Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome: Diagnosis, Classification, and Underlying Pathophysiology SEMINARS IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Sheldon, C. A., Paley, G. L., Beres, S. J., McCormack, S. E., Liu, G. T. 2017; 24 (2): 110?15

    Abstract

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is defined by the presence of elevated intracranial pressure in the setting of normal brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid. PTCS can occur in the pediatric and adult populations and, if untreated, may lead to permanent visual loss. In this review, discussion will focus on PTCS in the pediatric population and will outline its distinct epidemiology and key elements of diagnosis, evaluation and management. Finally, although the precise mechanisms are unclear, the underlying pathophysiology will be considered.

    View details for PubMedID 28941525

  • Optic Pathway Gliomas JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Beres, S., Avery, R. A. 2017; 15 (1): 15?24

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