Bio

Professional Education


  • Master of Public Health, New York Medical College (2010)
  • Master of Science, Georgetown University (2005)
  • Doctor of Medicine, New York Medical College (2010)

Stanford Advisors


Publications

All Publications


  • Peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells: candidate cells responsible for healing critical-sized calvarial bone defects. Stem cells translational medicine Li, S., Huang, K., Wu, J., Hu, M. S., Sanyal, M., Hu, M., Longaker, M. T., Lorenz, H. P. 2015; 4 (4): 359-368

    Abstract

    Postnatal tissue-specific stem/progenitor cells hold great promise to enhance repair of damaged tissues. Many of these cells are retrieved from bone marrow or adipose tissue via invasive procedures. Peripheral blood is an ideal alternative source for the stem/progenitor cells because of its ease of retrieval. We present a coculture system that routinely produces a group of cells from adult peripheral blood. Treatment with these cells enhanced healing of critical-size bone defects in the mouse calvarium, a proof of principle that peripheral blood-derived cells can be used to heal bone defects. From these cells, we isolated a subset of CD45(-) cells with a fibroblastic morphology. The CD45(-) cells were responsible for most of the differentiation-induced calcification activity and were most likely responsible for the enhanced healing process. These CD45(-) fibroblastic cells are plastic-adherent and exhibit a surface marker profile negative for CD34, CD19, CD11b, lineage, and c-kit and positive for stem cell antigen 1, CD73, CD44, CD90.1, CD29, CD105, CD106, and CD140?. Furthermore, these cells exhibited osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, and adipogenesis capabilities. The CD45(-) fibroblastic cells are the first peripheral blood-derived cells that fulfill the criteria of mesenchymal stem cells as defined by the International Society for Cellular Therapy. We have named these cells "blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells."

    View details for DOI 10.5966/sctm.2014-0150

    View details for PubMedID 25742693

  • Biological therapies for the treatment of cutaneous wounds: phase III and launched therapies. Expert opinion on biological therapy Rennert, R. C., Rodrigues, M., Wong, V. W., Duscher, D., Hu, M., Maan, Z., Sorkin, M., Gurtner, G. C., Longaker, M. T. 2013; 13 (11): 1523-1541

    Abstract

    Normal wound healing mechanisms can be overwhelmed in the setting of complex acute and chronic tissue injury. Biological therapies are designed to augment and/or restore the body's natural wound healing abilities. There are a variety of available and emerging technologies utilizing this approach that have demonstrated the ability to augment wound healing.In this review, the clinical data on launched and emerging biological therapies for wound healing applications are summarized. The methodologies discussed include biological skin equivalents, growth factors/small molecules and stem cell-based therapies.While many products possess convincing clinical data demonstrating their efficacy in comparison to standard treatment options, more robust, controlled studies are needed to determine the relative value among established and emerging biological therapies. Future bioengineering and stem cell-based approaches are of particular interest due to the simultaneous correction of multiple deficiencies present in the nonhealing wound.

    View details for DOI 10.1517/14712598.2013.842972

    View details for PubMedID 24093722

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