Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Emergency Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Emergency Medicine Director of Simulation, Dept. of Emergency Medicine (2019 - Present)
  • Emergency Medicine Simulation Fellowship Director, Dept. of Emergency Medicine (2016 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Outstanding Educator Award, Stanford Department of Emergency Medicine (2019)
  • Quarterly Bedside Teaching Award, Stanford-Kaiser Emergency Medicine Residency Program (2011)
  • Bedside Teaching Award, Stanford-Kaiser Emergency Medicine Residency Program (2014)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Fellow, American College of Emergency Physicians (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Fellowship Approval Committee, Society for Academic Emergency medicine (2018 - Present)
  • Board of Directors, Simulation Academy, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (2017 - 2019)

Professional Education


  • Residency: Stanford University Medical Center (2008) CA
  • Board Certification: Emergency Medicine, American Board of Emergency Medicine (2009)
  • Medical Education: Pennsylvania State University (2005) PA

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Interests include simulation for resident education, crisis management and behavior modification.

Projects


  • Undergraduate Classes - Introduction to the Management of the Ill Patient, Stanford University School of Medicine

    Location

    Stanford, CA

Publications

All Publications


  • Applying Educational Theory and Best Practices to Solve Common Challenges of Simulation-based Procedural Training in Emergency Medicine. AEM education and training Cassara, M., Schertzer, K., Falk, M. J., Wong, A. H., Hock, S. M., Bentley, S., Paetow, G., Conlon, L. W., Hughes, P. G., McKenna, R. T., Hrdy, M., Lei, C., Kulkarni, M., Smith, C. M., Young, A., Romo, E., Smith, M. D., Hernandez, J., Strother, C. G., Frallicciardi, A., Nadir, N. 2020; 4 (Suppl 1): S22?S39

    Abstract

    Objectives: Procedural competency is an essential prerequisite for the independent practice of emergency medicine. Multiple studies demonstrate that simulation-based procedural training (SBPT) is an effective method for acquiring and maintaining procedural competency and preferred over traditional paradigms ("see one, do one, teach one"). Although newer paradigms informing SBPT have emerged, educators often face circumstances that challenge and undermine their implementation.The goal of this paper is to identify and report on best practices and theory-supported solutions to some of these challenges as derived using a process of expert consensus building and reviews of the existing literature on SBPT.Methods: The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Simulation Academy SBPT Workgroup convened approximately 8 months prior to the 2019 SAEM Annual Meeting to perform a review of the literature and participate in a consensus-building process to identify solutions (in the form of best practices and educational theory) to these challenges faced by educators engaging in SBPT.Results and Analysis: Thirteen distinct educational challenges to SBPT emerged from the expert group's primary literature reviews and consensus-building processes. Three domains emerged upon further analysis of the 13 challenges: learner, educator, and curriculum. Six challenges within the "learner" domain were selected for comprehensive discussion in this paper, as they were deemed representative of the most common and most significant threats to ideal SBPT. Each of the six challenges aligns with one of the following themes: 1) maximizing active learning, 2) maintaining learner engagement, 3) embracing learner diversity, 4) optimizing cognitive load, 5) promoting mindfulness and reflection, and 6) emphasizing deliberate practice for mastery learning. Over 20 "special treatments" for mitigating the impact of the 13 challenges were derived from the secondary literature search and consensus-building process prior to and during the preconference workshop; 11 of these that best address the six learner-centered challenges are explored, including implications for educators involved in SBPT.Conclusions/Implications for Educators: We propose multiple consensus-generated solutions (in the form of best practices and applied educational theory) that we believe are suitable and well aligned to overcome commonly encountered learner-centered challenges and threats to optimal SBPT.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/aet2.10418

    View details for PubMedID 32072105

  • Disaster Medicine: A Multi-Modality Curriculum Designed and Implemented for Emergency Medicine Residents. Disaster medicine and public health preparedness Ngo, J., Schertzer, K., Harter, P., Smith-Coggins, R. 2016; 10 (4): 611-614

    Abstract

    Few established curricula are available for teaching disaster medicine. We describe a comprehensive, multi-modality approach focused on simulation to teach disaster medicine to emergency medicine residents in a 3-year curriculum.Residents underwent a 3-year disaster medicine curriculum incorporating a variety of venues, personnel, and roles. The curriculum included classroom lectures, tabletop exercises, virtual reality simulation, high-fidelity simulation, hospital disaster drills, and journal club discussion. All aspects were supervised by specialty emergency medicine faculty and followed a structured debriefing. Residents rated the high-fidelity simulations by using a 10-point Likert scale.Three classes of emergency medicine residents participated in the 3-year training program. Residents found the exercise to be realistic, educational, and relevant to their practice. After participating in the program, residents felt better prepared for future disasters.Given the large scope of impact that disasters potentiate, it is understandably difficult to teach these skills effectively. Training programs can utilize this simulation-based curriculum to better prepare the nation's emergency medicine physicians for future disasters. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;0:1-4).

    View details for DOI 10.1017/dmp.2016.8

    View details for PubMedID 27040319

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: