Bio

Bio


Research Interests: Pastoralism, Health and Conflict, Humanitarian Response
Regions: Ethiopia, South Sudan

Hannah Wild is an MD Candidate at Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on the health of nomadic populations and more broadly, the intersection of health, armed conflict, and culture in Sub-Saharan Africa. She received her undergraduate degree in Comparative Literature from Harvard University with special fields in oral literature and ethnography. Prior to beginning medical school she received a post-graduate fellowship to conduct ethnographic fieldwork with the Nyangatom, a tribe of nomadic pastoralists in the Omo Valley of southwest Ethiopia. She spent 18 months living with the Nyangatom?s nomadic cattle camps and studying their traditional medical practices, and is fluent in the local language. She currently leads multi-institution research collaborations to develop methodology for including nomadic groups in population data and household surveys. Her work has received support from Stanford?s Center for Innovation in Global Health, Geospatial Center, and Center for African Studies, as well as the American Society for Tropical Medicine & Hygiene and Digital Globe Foundation.

https://arcg.is/0XGrDO
http://trajectorymagazine.com/digitalglobe-foundation-celebrates-10-years/

Education & Certifications


  • Bachelor of Arts, Harvard University, Literature (2011)

Publications

All Publications


  • Making Pastoralists Count: Geospatial Methods for the Health Surveillance of Nomadic Populations The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Wild, H., Glowacki, L., Maples, S., Mejia-Guevara, I., Krystosik, A., Bonds, M., Hiruy, A., LaBeaud, A. D., Barry, M. 2019
  • ?Lost Generation? in South Sudan: A Broader Approach Toward Peace Urgently Needed Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness Wild, H., Fallavier, P., Patel, R. 2019: 1-9

    View details for DOI 10.1017/dmp.2018.144

  • The militarization of cattle raiding in South Sudan: how a traditional practice became a tool for political violence Journal of International Humanitarian Action Wild, H., Jok, J. M., Patel, R. 2018; 3 (2)
  • On the Move in Cattle Country: Tracking Nomadic Pastoralists in Southwest Ethiopia. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene Wild, H. 2018; 99 (1): 9?10

    View details for PubMedID 29978779

  • To Do No Harm: Humanitarian Aid in Conflict Demands Political Engagement Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness Patel, R., Wild, H. 2018; 12 (5): 567-568

    View details for DOI 10.1017/dmp.2017.133

  • MAKING PASTORALISTS COUNT: HEALTH SURVEILLANCE OF A NOMADIC POPULATION USING A GEOSPATIALLY DERIVED SAMPLING FRAME Wild, H., Glowacki, L., Maples, S., Mejia-Guevara, I., Hiruy, A., Krystosik, A., Bonds, M., LaBeaud, A., Barry, M. AMER SOC TROP MED & HYGIENE. 2018: 659?60

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